Mechanism Linked to Tumors Becoming More Aggressive -- MEDICA Trade Fair

Image: tools for blood testing; Copyright: panthermedia.net/gisne

Blood samples may provide patient radiosensitivity answers

13/10/2017

How much radiation or chemotherapy can a certain person handle? With help from blood or tissue testing, it may be possible to answer this question in advance, which in turn could improve treatment, as research at Sahlgrenska Academy shows.
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Image: abstract graphic about hereditary colon cancer; Copyright: IDIBELL

A new genetic marker accounts for up to 1.4 percent of cases of hereditary colon cancer

12/10/2017

The finding, once validated by other research groups, could allow patients with mutations in this gene to follow a clinical approach much more consistent with their genetics.
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Image: illustration of a cancer cell; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Sebastian Kaulitzki

Stanford-led study uncovers mutation that supercharges tumor-suppressor

12/10/2017

Cancer researchers have long hailed p53, a tumor-suppressor protein, for its ability to keep unruly cells from forming tumors. But for such a highly studied protein, p53 has hidden its tactics well.
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Genetic targets to chemo-resistant breast cancer identified

10/10/2017

Research led by Dr. Carlos Arteaga, Director of the Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, has identified potential targets for treatment of triple negative breast cancer, the most aggressive form of breast cancer.
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Image: microscope image of fluorescent cancer cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net/vshivkova

New approaches in targeted cancer therapy

06/10/2017

In a large-scale testing procedure, scientists from Cologne University Hospital have explored the effects of more than 1,500 substances on different kinds of cancer cells. The results from this study are a fundamental prerequisite for the development of new therapies for NMC, an aggressive cancer which is often lethal.
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Image: microscopic images of stem cells; Copyright: Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Amount of water in stem cells can determine its fate as fat or bone

05/10/2017

Adding or removing water from a stem cell can change the destiny of the cell, researchers have discovered in a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
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Image: doctor examines male patients with the magnifying glass for skin cancer.; Copyright: panthermedia.net/alexraths

Doctors gain a greater understanding of skin cancer using tattoos

05/10/2017

Cancer is on the rise and the need to be empathetic when giving a patient their diagnosis and throughout treatment is imperative. Now, a collaborative study, with a Huddersfield professor, has enabled future doctors to experience some of the challenges patients living with skin cancer can face to develop a greater empathy for their patients.
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Promising modification of the intestinal flora in colon cancer

27/09/2017

Living lactic acid bacteria, probiotics, can change the intestinal flora of patients with cancer of the colon. These are the findings of a study published in the journal BMJ Open Gastroenterology.
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Image: woman holding a hand to her throat, which is marked red; Copyright: panthermedia.net/vonschonertagen

New treatment for chronic throat irritation and globus sensation in the gullet

26/09/2017

Chronic throat irritation, a permanent globus sensation, a sore or dry sensation in the throat are common symptoms, which are often trivialised and wrongly attributed to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. However, these are also the characteristic symptoms of patients suffering from displaced gastric mucosa in the oesophagus (ectopic mucosa).
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Image: image of how Taxanes induce tripolar instead of normal bipolar cell division; Copyright: Munich University Hospital

Cancer drug stimulates tripolar mode of mitosis

21/09/2017

Taxanes inhibit cell division and make cancer cells sensitive to radiation therapy. A current study has investigated the underlying mechanisms of this action – and which biomarkers may be useful for predicting the success of therapy.
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Image: Comparison of normal vs hepatoblastoma liver tissue; Copyright: Etienne Meylan/EPFL

Metabolism can be used to subtype hepatoblastoma tumors

19/09/2017

Looking at cell metabolism instead of histology, EPFL scientists have identified new biomarkers that could help more accurately classify the two main subtypes of hepatoblastoma, a children liver cancer. Hepatoblastoma is a rare pediatric liver cancer, usually diagnosed in the first three years of life.
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A hair-trigger for cells fighting infection

19/09/2017

To fight infections cells in the immune system play a dangerous game with their own genes. Damaging genes allows B cells to make antibodies that are specifically equipped to target to specific causes of illness, but damaging genes also puts them at risk of becoming cancerous.
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Image: liver with a warning sign on it; copyright: panthermedia.net/Sebastian Kaulitzki

How liver cancer develops

13/09/2017

Liver cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer-related death and represents the fastest rising cancer worldwide. In most cases, the tumor develops in patients with chronic liver disease. Such diseases include chronic infections with hepatitis viruses or a so-called fatty liver due to nutritional or genetically caused lipometabolic disorders or an excessive consumption of alcohol.
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How new blood vessels sprout

11/09/2017

IBS biologists discovered a key regulator of normal as well as pathological formation of new blood vessels.
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Image: sheet of paper with the word cancer on it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/stanciuc

From bed to bench and back to bed: Mimicking how HPV-positive cancer responds to treatment

11/09/2017

Patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma who are positive for human papilloma virus (HPV-positive) have been observed to respond significantly better to chemo-radiotherapy than HPV-negative patients. This observation is surprising because HPV infection leads to an increased risk of developing oropharyngeal cancer. To date, the reason for this dichotomy has not been well understood.
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Image: female doctor talks with a man about his research results displayed on a computer screen; Copyright: panthermedia.net/imagepointfr

Recurrence of prostate cancer could be reduced thanks to exciting new discovery

06/09/2017

Ground breaking research could reduce the recurrence of prostate cancer in males, a new study in the journal Nature Communications reports.
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Image: three pill boxes with different coloured pills; Copyright: panthermedia.net/garyphoto

Mayo Clinic researchers review the clinical potential of senolytic drugs on aging

05/09/2017

Researchers are moving closer to realizing the clinical potential of drugs that have previously been shown to support healthy aging in animals.
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Image: Colored sonographic image of the human heart from Doppler ultrasonography; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Belish

Imaging techniques: ultrasound, MRI, CT, catheters and other procedures to keep a healthy heart

01/09/2017

Many people are affected by heart disease today because - among other reasons- our modern unhealthy lifestyle is taking a toll on our hearts. A reliable diagnosis and treatment are crucial for patients with heart disease since all other organs depend on the pumping of our vital organ. Modern imaging techniques are a key to understanding the heart.
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DNA sensor plays critical role in cancer immunotherapy via response to unexpected DNA form

31/08/2017

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers report for the first time that tumors stressed by cancer immunotherapy release their mitochondrial DNA into nearby immune cells, triggering a host alert system.
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RNA: a vicious pathway to cancer?

25/08/2017

According to the current doctrine, cancer cells develop due to mutations in genomic DNA. But could it be also caused also by faulty RNA molecules? A number of clues are pointing to this surprising hypothesis.
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From cancer evolution to personalized therapies

24/08/2017

Being able to predict the resistance or sensitivity of a tumour cell to a drug is a key success-factor of cancer precision therapy. But such a prediction is made difficult by the fact that genetic alterations in tumours change dynamically over time and are often interdependent, following a pattern that is poorly understood.
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Newly discovered pathway for pain processing could lead to new treatments

24/08/2017

The discovery of a new biological pathway involved in pain processing offers hope of using existing cancer drugs to replace the use of opioids in chronic pain treatment, according to scientists at McGill University.
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Image: illustration of co‐expression networks; Copyright: KTH Royal Institute of Technology

Study offers new targets for drugs to treat fatty liver disease and liver cancer

23/08/2017

There may be no silver bullet for treating liver cancer or fatty liver disease, but knowing the right targets will help science develop the most effective treatments. Researchers in Sweden have just identified a number of drug targets that can be used in the development of new efficient treatment strategies with minimum side effects.
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Image: interferometric detection of scattered light, iSCAT; Copyright: MPL

Interface between Physics and Medicine: new interdisciplinary center

22/08/2017

Physics has always supported medical science, especially when it comes to practical implementation. Now physicists and health professionals join in collaborative research at an interdisciplinary Center in Erlangen and incorporate fundamental principles of theoretical physics in their studies of diseases.
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Image: transparent brain with a tumor, highlighted in orange; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Sebastian Kaulitzki

Researchers map brain tumour cells’ adaptation to oxygen deprivation

18/08/2017

The most aggressive variant of brain tumour – glioblastoma – has an average survival rate of 15 months. There is therefore an urgent need for new treatment strategies for this group of patients. A research team from Lund University in Sweden has now identified new factors which may affect the tumour cells’ ability to resist treatment.
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Image: chalk board with sketch of sugar molecule formula; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Boris Zerwann

Cancer detection with sugar molecules

16/08/2017

Scientists from the University of Würzburg have synthesized a complex sugar molecule which specifically binds to the tumor protein Galectin-1. This could help to recognize tumors at an early stage and to combat them in a targeted manner
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Image: woman holding two models of a kidney in front of her upper body; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Ben Schonewille

Improved analysis of kidney cancer

14/08/2017

Every year, just over 1000 people are diagnosed with kidney cancer in Sweden. The three most common variants are clear cell, papillary and chromophobe renal cancer. Researchers compare the gene expression in tumour cells from a kidney cancer patient with cells from healthy tissue to figure out in which part of the kidney the cancer began and what went wrong in these cells.
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Image: person is taking Swiss francs out of a wallet; Copyright: panthermedia.net/PeJo

Cultural factors account for cost differences at the end of life

10/08/2017

In their final year of life, on average men cause more healthcare costs than women. Dying is more expensive in the French- and Italian-speaking parts of Switzerland than in the German-speaking part. These are the findings of an analysis of health insurance data that was conducted as part of the National Research Programme "End of life" (NRP 67).
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Image: A network map of coloured dots; Copyright: Jeff Leinert, NHGRI

Social interaction affects cancer patients' response to treatment

27/07/2017

How well cancer patients fared after chemotherapy was affected by their social interaction with other patients during treatment, according to a new study by researchers at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), part of the National Institutes of Health, and the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom.
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Image: A large medical device with a treatment couch and four movable boxes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Thomas Hecker

Cancer: refined treatment with proton minibeams

10/07/2017

Radiation therapies are an essential component of today’s oncology because they enable the treatment of localized tumors. Yet they have one major drawback: radiation damages not just tumor cells but also healthy tissue. One solution to solve this problem could be proton minibeam therapy, which uses finely focused beams.
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Surgical lasers: the quest to be compact, mobile, and user-friendly

03/07/2017

Not all lasers are the same – especially in the surgical field, it all depends on what’s inside: the different operational wavelengths of laser light also affect human tissue in different ways. This is why a single laser for a variety of applications drastically simplifies the job of physicians.
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Image: A dermatology laser is used to remove a mole; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Michael Krause

Laser surgery: usability, flexibility, treatment quality

03/07/2017

The scalpel is considered the classic surgical instrument and as such, has remained unchanged for quite some time. However, today’s technology opens up a world of new possibilities for cutting tissue. Next to high-frequency electrosurgical scalpels that work with electric power, surgeons also use a variety of different lasers. They promise great usability and better treatment.
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Image: A women with a bald head and a headscarf, smiling, sitting on a sofa talking ot another woman; Copyright:Katharina Bia asiewic

Irreversible Electroporation – Last hope for liver cancer patients

24/04/2017

Liver cancer is the fifth most common malignant tumor in the world. The tumor can be removed through surgery or by utilizing thermal ablation techniques. If a treatment with conservative methods is no longer possible, there is an alternative: irreversible electroporation (IRE). The effectiveness of this method was now confirmed by a clinical study.
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Image: A young girl is lying in the hospital bed, behind her a nurse is adjusting a monitor; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Monkeybusiness Images

Working with children with cancer – More than just a job

02/01/2017

Our topic title "pediatric (children’s) oncology" evoked strong emotional reactions from several mothers and fathers of our staff. "This hits too close to home for me, I couldn’t write about it", or "How do people manage to deal with this?". And we are only on the sidelines; physicians, caregivers and nurses at the hospital, hospice or families at home are the ones that have the real tough job.
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Image: Three physicians during a meeting; Copyright: KiTZ/Philipp Benjamin

Children's Tumor Center: consolidated treatment under one roof

02/01/2017

Treatments for children need to be different from treatment for adults – this also applies in oncology. Having said that, children do not just need new and different treatment concepts that still necessitate research. They also require the support from their families, who need to be nearby during treatment.
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Health Apps: "Mobile Applications for smartphones have strengths and weaknesses"

22/03/2016

Medical apps like diabetes or high blood pressure diaries are becoming increasingly popular with smartphone users. There are many available choices out there but they are not always clear. Added to this is the question of how the data collected by the apps can be sensibly incorporated into treatment.
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Graphic: The pancreas and the surrounding organs

Pancreatic cancer: diagnosis via signature analysis

08/03/2016

Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest forms of cancer because it is difficult to diagnose and only presents with symptoms in the later stages. In the future, a laboratory test developed at the Greifswald University Medicine could make an early detection of this type of cancer and consequently a faster and better treatment possible.
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Image: Esophageal Cancer

Esophageal cancer: increased patient safety thanks to the ”Da Vinci“ surgical system

09/11/2015

Interview with Professor Jürgen Weitz, Director of the Clinic and Polyclinic of Visceral, Thoracic, and Vascular Surgery, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus at the Technical University Dresden
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From the periodic table of elements into medicine: silicon for theranostics

01/10/2015

Semiconductor nanoparticles for biomedical applications have been researched for some time now. Not only are they millionths of a millimeter in size, they also offer great potential for cancer diagnostics and therapy, so-called theranostics. They enter cells, are activated by ultrasonic radiation and destroy the cells using the generated vibration.
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Theranostics: Complex particles for tomorrow's medicine

01/10/2015

It is a portmanteau, a mixture of two words. This way it saves us time and trouble while speaking because the human speech apparatus is lazy. And it describes a mixture of procedures: the combination of two procedures that would normally be separate in medicine. We are talking about theranostics.
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Fighting myomas with ultrasound

01/10/2015

A proper diagnosis is a part of great therapy. However, it can also be beneficial to be able to quickly respond to changes during a treatment. One example of this is the treatment of uterine myomas. Female patients at the University Hospital Bonn are treated using so-called high-intensity focused ultrasound, HIFU in short. Prof. Holger Strunk explains this procedure.
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Prostate cancer: Agent with theranostic potential

03/08/2015

Endoradiotherapy can be very unpleasant for cancer patients, since it does not only harm tumor cells, but also healthy ones. Sometimes, patients even need to stop therapy because of the side effects. Physicians and researchers are thus continuously searching for ways to transport radiopharmaceuticals directly and exclusively to their target.
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Photo: Image with red luminous bladder, next cystoscope

Making the invisible visible with fluorescence

22/06/2015

Bladder tumors have different growth characteristics. In most cases, they are limited to the inner wall of the bladder and thus well resectable. Unlike carcinoma in situ, which becomes muscle invasive after a certain amount of time. To be able to completely remove the tumor during resection, photodynamic diagnostics (PDD) can make sense.
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Lung cancer: A blood test evaluates the effectiveness of therapy

01/06/2015

Can liquid biopsies become the new trend in cancer diagnostics? The medical world has asked this question for quite some time. The first globally approved liquid biopsy-based test for lung cancer shows that this can work. Yet further findings and research are still required to establish this less invasive method in diagnostics.
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Cancer Immunotherapy: Individual mutations as new target structures

01/06/2015

A tumor is as unique as the person who is affected by it. For a long time, it was assumed this would make treatment more difficult since cancer drugs are not able to be one hundred percent effective in targeting the affected cells. In this interview with MEDICA.de, Professor Ugur Sahin explains why it is precisely these individual mutations that make him hopeful for a new type of therapy.
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Tumor markers: State-of-the-art diagnostics for personalized medicine

01/06/2015

When cancer is diagnosed, the terms tumor markers or biomarkers keep popping up. They describe characteristics that are not found in healthy persons. The classic tumor markers can be easily detected in blood samples or other body fluids. Other analysis methods require more effort. Yet they all share one thing in common: biomarkers indicate a potential tumor.
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Early cancer detection: "Physicians and patients need a good database"

04/05/2015

Whether it is a mammogram, colonoscopy or a skin cancer screening – after a certain age, we are subject to various early cancer detection screenings. Yet many of us don’t know that these screening tests are also associated with risks. This is something what Dr. Sylvia Sänger from the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf discovered in a study.
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Statutory Skin Cancer Screening: "This is not just about mortality rates"

04/05/2015

Since the end of April 2015, the long-awaited evaluation report on the skin cancer screening programs offered by German health insurance providers is now finally available. We spoke with Dr. Ralph von Kiedrowski, Board Member of the German Dermatologist Association (German: Berufsverband Deutscher Dermatologen) on what the screening can accomplish and his take on the G-BA report.
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Cancer prevention: Beneficial and ultimately personal

04/05/2015

There are many decisions to be made in an adult life; among them are cancer prevention screenings. They are voluntary and many people deliberate whether they should go or not and if they would actually want to know the results. Science, politics and health care professionals also ponder with each new preventive service whether it is beneficial and who should end up paying for it.
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Tissue storage: "Our top biobanks are internationally leading the charge"

02/02/2015

Only projects with a solid foundation are successful in the long run. This is also true for science. Biobanks are the most important component of this foundation when it comes to fundamental biomedical research: Only high quality tissue samples that are stored there make conclusive research possible - for example in search of the causes of tumorigenesis.
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Xenon magnetic resonance imaging: making pathological changes in the body visible

03/11/2014

As an imaging procedure, magnetic resonance tomography has become essential in clinical practice, since it can easily make organs and tissue visible. However, until now abnormal cancer cells or small centers of inflammation remained almost invisible. Now cell biologists from Berlin, Germany, have succeeded in fixing this problem with xenon magnetic resonance imaging.
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Surgery: "Our camera detects the tiniest remainder of a tumor"

03/02/2014

Differentiating tumor tissue from healthy tissue isn’t always easy for surgeons. Scattered cancer cells and early cancer are often hard to detect with the naked eye. A special camera now makes even the tiniest remainder of a tumor visible during surgery.
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KOHALA: digital student for cancer treatment

03/02/2014

Shortening a time-consuming procedure from four hours to five minutes and automate it at the same time sounds like a dream come true for employees in all fields and industry sectors. This dream could soon become a reality for radiologists. Software could take away the tedious processing of CT images, which is required before cancer radiation therapy.
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Radiology and technology: "Numerous phantom studies have been conducted that prove the advantages of this new CT system"

03/02/2014

Radiologists usually do their work after oncologists when it comes to cancer treatment. Yet modern radiology also provides treatments at this point. MEDICA.de spoke with Professor Stefan Schönberg, Director of the Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine at the University Medical Center Mannheim, Germany, about the use of a new computer tomograph and its benefits for patients.
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Photo: Removal of a colon polyp with a snare

Endoscopy: "A small section of the colonic wall is completely removed"

05/01/2014

Eventually, all adults need to see a physician for colon cancer prevention. While the exam goes by quickly thanks to sedation, it sometimes leads to a follow-up procedure if a growth in the colon could not be removed with the endoscope and requires open surgery.
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