Leukaemia Cells Are “Bad to the Bone” -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

Image: scientist in the laboratory - Dr. Ryan A. Davis; Copyright: Phil Jones, Senior Photographer, Augusta University

Antioxidant therapy may reduce cardiovascular risk of young women with type 1 diabetes

19/04/2018

The high estrogen levels that typically afford younger women protection from cardiovascular disease appear to instead multiply their risk if they have type 1 diabetes, researchers say.
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Image: Intracellular replication of Streptococcus pneumoniae inside splenic macrophages; Copyright: University of Leicester

Antimicrobial therapy can prevent sepsis in pneumonia patients

19/04/2018

Research sheds light on initial phase of infectious disease and potential for prevention of pneumococcal septicaemia.
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Image: two scientists in the laboratory - Drs. Kumar Vaibhav Krishnan Dhandapani; Copyright: Phil Jones, Senior Photographer, Augusta University

Receptor that feels the heat of a red chili pepper may be target for TBI recovery

16/04/2018

A receptor on our immune cells that can detect both the heat of a red chili pepper and the extreme physical heat of a pizza oven may help protect the brain following a traumatic brain injury, scientists say.
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Image: colorful 3D globe in comic style with signs for location; Copyright: Shimpei Ishiyama

How to reprogram memory cells in the brain

12/04/2018

Long-term memory of specific places is stored in the brain in so-called place cells. A team of neuroscientists headed by Dr Andrea Burgalossi of the University of Tübingen's Werner Reichardt Centre for Integrative Neuroscience (CIN) have now 'reprogrammed' such place cells in free-roaming mice, by sending electrical impulses directly to individual neurons.
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Image: woman with a scarf around her head, embraced from behind by a girl; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ArturVerkhovetskiy

Efficient genetic modification of immune cells

11/04/2018

A new method enables genes in living T-cells in mice to be modified quickly and efficiently. It makes use of plasmids, a tried-and-tested method of genetic engineering. Researchers from the Department of Biomedicine at the University of Basel and University Hospital Basel reported these findings in the Journal of Immunology.
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Image: four microscope images in comparison; Copyright: Parekh/MPIP

Stressing out about granule proteins

09/04/2018

MPI-P group leader Sapun Parekh and Brown University Professor Nick Fawzi have received $750,000 from the Human Frontier in Science Program (HFSP) over the next 3 years to study the "Structure and biophysics of disordered domains mediating RNP granules: from atoms to cells".
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Image: coffee beans and ground coffee; Copyright: panthermedia.net/wideonet

Long-term caffeine worsens anxiety symptoms and fear of the new associated with Alzheimer's disease

06/04/2018

A study coordinated by the Institute of Neuroscience of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (Inc-UAB) and in collaboration with the Karolinska Institutet (KI) in Sweden provides evidence that a long-term consumption of caffeine has negative effects for Alzheimer's disease.
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Image: smiling woman; Copyright: Kofi Boahene

Surgeons transform static 'Mona Lisa' smiles to joyous ones

04/04/2018

By modifying a muscle transplant operation, Johns Hopkins surgeons report they are able to restore authentic facial expressions of joy -- wide and even smiles - to selected patients with one-sided facial muscle paralysis due to birth defects, stroke, tumors or Bell's palsy.
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Image: a Ixodes scapularis tick; Copyright: Dr. Utpal Pal, University of Maryland

UMD researcher uncovers protein used to outsmart the human immune system

03/04/2018

Findings have major implications for tick-borne diseases like Lyme disease.
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Image: red blood cells, leukocytes and platelets; Copyright: National Cancer Institute

Haemophiliacs and their treatment – danger signals involved in immune response against factor-VIII

03/04/2018

In patients with haemophilia A, the missing blood coagulation factor VIII is administered, and thus replaced, intravenously. A part of the patients, however, develops antibodies (inhibitors) against factor VIII, which, in the worst case scenario, can cause uncontrolled bleeding.
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Image: team of researchers; Copyright: Saint Louis University

Scientists discover new causes of cellular decline in prematurely aging kids

22/03/2018

Rare disease also sheds light on normal cell aging, SLU researcher says.
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Image: illustration of DNA strands; Copyright: University of Delaware

Programming DNA to deliver cancer drugs

22/03/2018

Recent developments in neuroscience set high requirements for sophisticated data management, not least when implantable Brain Machine Interfaces are used to establish electronic communication between the brain's nerve cells and computers.
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Image: human hand next to a 3D graphic of a human brain surrounded by neuronal patterns; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sdecoret

New method manages and stores data from millions of nerve cells - in real time

21/03/2018

Recent developments in neuroscience set high requirements for sophisticated data management, not least when implantable Brain Machine Interfaces are used to establish electronic communication between the brain's nerve cells and computers.
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Image: doctor in front of a computer screen, holding a test tube; Copyright: panthermedia.net/tonodiaz

Epigenetic analysis: Giving the right name to a tumor

21/03/2018

Scientists from the "Hopp Children's Cancer Center" at the NCT Heidelberg (KiTZ) and the Neuropathology Department at Heidelberg University Hospital have substantially enhanced the classification of tumors of the central nervous system (CNS).
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Image: team of researchers in front of a computer; Copyright: Pauline Zulueta, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary

Mapping a genetic risk

20/03/2018

UCalgary researchers discover an important clue to help predict disease.
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Image: female researcher holding a petri dish with cultured germs; Copyright: Goethe University Frankfurt

Research project on dangerous hospital germ extended

20/03/2018

German Research Foundation extends project aimed at combating multi-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strains.
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Image: team of female researchers in front of a computer; Copyright: WSU

WSU researchers see gene influencing performance of sleep-deprived people

19/03/2018

Washington State University researchers have discovered a genetic variation that predicts how well people perform certain mental tasks when they are sleep deprived.
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Image: leafy green vegetables in a bowl; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Elenathewise

Putting a fork in cognitive decline

19/03/2018

While cognitive abilities naturally decline with age, eating one serving of leafy green vegetables a day may aid in preserving memory and thinking skills as a person grows older, according to a study by researchers at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. The study results were published in the December 20, issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
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Image: illustration of breaking DNA; Copyright: Université de Genève/Halazonetis

Why premature cell division promotes cancers

16/03/2018

The accumulation of mutations in the human genome is at the origin of cancers, as well as the development of resistance to treatments. The Cyclin E and Myc genes are active in the control of cell division. When they are mutated, for example in response to a carcinogen, these genes induce cells to start replicating their DNA prematurely during the cell cycle.
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Image: Optical readouts of HL-1 cardiomyocytes in response to chemical uncoupling by CCCP in blue and yellow; Copyright: Irene Georgakoudi, Tufts University

Researchers develop optical tools to detect metabolic changes linked to disease

16/03/2018

Metabolic changes in cells can occur at the earliest stages of disease. In most cases, knowledge of those signals is limited, since we usually detect disease only after it has done significant damage.
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Image: illustration of red blood corpuscles; Copyright: University of Basel, Department of Biomedicine

Inherited mutation leads to overproduction of EPO

15/03/2018

A newly-discovered hereditary mutation is responsible for an increased production of erythropoietin (EPO) in the blood. This mutation causes a messenger RNA (mRNA) that is not normally involved in the formation of proteins to be reprogrammed so that it produces EPO, thus abnormally increasing the number of red blood cells.
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Image: Cells with Huntington's disease under the microscope; Copyright: Juan Sbodio

Signaling pathway involving the Golgi apparatus identified in cells with Huntington's disease

15/03/2018

Working with cells grown in the lab, Johns Hopkins researchers have identified a biochemical pathway that allows a structure within cells, called the Golgi apparatus, to combat stress caused by free radicals and oxidants. The research team showed that this pathway can be activated by a drug called monensin, which is commonly used as an antibiotic in animal feed.
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Image: elderly man who sits on the edge of the bed and holds his chest painfully; Copyright: panthermedia.net/belchonock

New insights into why patients have a higher risk of heart attack in the morning

14/03/2018

Cardiovascular disease patients have lower levels of an important family of protective molecules in their blood in the morning, which could be increasing their risk of blood clots and heart attacks at those times, according to early research led by Queen Mary University of London.
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Image: different colours running into each other: image of brown fat tissue; Copyright: Reber/TUM

Brown adipose tissue made transparent

14/03/2018

Brown adipose tissue has played a key role in prevention research since its presence was first documented in adults. However, there was no non-invasive method of measuring its heat generation. A team at the Technical University Munich (TUM) and the Helmholtz Zentrum München has now succeeded in making the activity of brown adipose tissue visible without injecting substances.
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Image: Close-up of a hand on the wheel of a wheelchair; Copyright: panthermedia.net/apid

Canadian researchers open a new front in the fight against MS

13/03/2018

A discovery led by scientists at the University of Alberta and McGill University is providing hope of a new therapeutic target in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients, which could one day be used to prevent the symptoms and progression of the disease.
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Image: two asian women; Copyright: Cindy Brauer

TSRI scientists zero in on treatment for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

12/03/2018

About 1 in 2,500 people have a degenerative nerve disease called Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT). The disease is typically diagnosed in children, who can lose their ability to walk and use their hands for fine motor skills. There is no cure – yet.
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Image: Ribosome; Copyright: DLafontaine ULB

Daffodils to fight against cancer

07/03/2018

A research describes the anti-cancer effects of a natural alkaloid extracted from Daffodils. Led by Denis Lafontaine, affiliated with the Faculty of Sciences at the ULB, the researchers have discovered that this compound triggers the activation of an anti-tumoral surveillance pathway.
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Image: blood-patrolling monocytes (red) adhering to inflamed endothelium (green) in the inner curvature of the aortic arch of a mouse with incipient atherosclerosis; Copyright: CNIC

Blocking a protein could improve the effectiveness of intravascular cellular 'policing'

07/03/2018

The study shows that blockade of the protease MT4-MMP increases the activity of blood-patrolling monocytes in the circulation.
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Image: pencil sketch of a human head with brain which is erased by an eraser; Copyright: panthermedia.net/andreus

Brain ageing may begin earlier than expected

06/03/2018

Physicists have devised a new method of investigating brain function, opening a new frontier in the diagnoses of neurodegenerative and ageing related diseases.
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Image: Rebecca Hochstein collecting samples in a hot spring in Yellowstone; Copyright: Derek Loudermilk

MSU researchers reveal findings about virus that lives in Yellowstone hot springs

05/03/2018

For seven years as a graduate student at Montana State University, Rebecca Hochstein hiked into the backcountry of Yellowstone National Park.
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Image: a pink female gender symbol next to a blue male gender symbol; Copyright: panthermedia.net/get4net

Hormones may affect girls' interests, but not their gender identity or playmates

05/03/2018

Prenatal exposure to male hormones influences which activities girls are interested and engage in, but the effects of those hormones don't extend to gender identity or who they socialize with, according to Penn State researchers.
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Image: microscope photo in purple; Copyright: Kai Hildner

Minimising risks of transplants

02/03/2018

A bone marrow transplant is often the only therapy available to save leukaemia patients, but the risk of complications is high. In spite of devoting considerable time and effort to finding a suitable donor, nearly half of all patients experience an unwanted reaction of their immune system, which often attacks their skin and liver and in up to 50% of cases the intestines.
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Image: fluorescence spectroscopy; Copyright: Christoph Schumacher, dunkelweiss

New Interaction Mechanism of Proteins Discovered

02/03/2018

UZH researchers have discovered a previously unknown way in which proteins interact with one another and cells organize themselves. This new mechanism involves two fully unstructured proteins forming an ultra-high-affinity complex due to their opposite net charge. Proteins usually bind one another as a result of perfectly matching shapes in their three-dimensional structures.
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Image: test tubes; Copyright: Hanna Oksanen, University of Turku

Finnish Research Group Discovers a New Immune System Regulator

01/03/2018

Academy Professor Riitta Lahesmaa’s research group from Turku Centre for Biotechnology of the University of Turku and Åbo Akademi University, Finland, has discovered a new regulator of the immune system, a key factor that controls development of regulatory T cells.
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Image: yellow tape measure with capsules in front of it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Jiri Hera

Personalized cancer medicine: customized treatment

01/03/2018

Everyone is different. This statement also applies to our health. Cancer, in particular, can look and progress differently depending on the individual person. That’s why every patient ideally also needs a customized treatment that is tailored to their individual needs. But how feasible is this idea?
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Image: syringe filled with drugs on a table and depressed woman in the background; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kmiragaya

Heroin vaccine blocks lethal overdose

23/02/2018

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have achieved a major milestone toward designing a safe and effective vaccine to both treat heroin addiction and block lethal overdose of the drug. Their research, published today in the journal Molecular Pharmaceutics, shows how a new anti-heroin formulation that is safe in animal models remains stable at room temperature for at least 30 days.
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Image: comic illustration of a smiling police man and an angry looking police man; Copyright: panthermedia.net/studiostoks

Meet RIPK3: Good Cop, Bad Cop, all in one

23/02/2018

Each year, influenza kills half a million people globally with the elderly and very young most often the victims. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported 37 children have died in the United States during the current flu season.
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Image: a container with the nutrient medium for cancer cells; Copyright: Dr. Markus Wehland

Cells in space – extraterrestrial approaches in cancer research

22/02/2018

Here on Earth, all experiments are bound by gravitation. Yet, freed from gravity's grip, tumor cells, for example, behave in an entirely different way. As part of the "Thyroid Cancer Cells in Space" project by the University of Magdeburg, smartphone-sized containers carrying poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells are sent into space.
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Gene expression patterns may help determine time of death

22/02/2018

International team of scientists led by Roderic Guigó at the Centre for Genomic Regulation in Barcelona showed that changes in gene expression in different tissues triggered by death can be used to predict the time of death of an individual.
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Image: images of knee joints from control and FoxO deficient mice; Copyright: Lotz Lab, The Scripps Research Institute

TSRI scientists find key proteins control risk of osteoarthritis during aging

21/02/2018

More than 30 million Americans suffer from osteoarthritis making it one of the most common age-related diseases.
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Image: biomimetics offers an innovative approach to solving human problems by imitating strategies of for example hibernators like bears found in nature; Copyright: Gregor Rauer

New treatment strategies for chronic kidney disease from the animal kingdom

20/02/2018

The field of biomimetics offers an innovative approach to solving human problems by imitating strategies found in nature. Medical research could also benefit from biomimetics, as a group of international experts from various fields, including a wildlife veterinarian and wildlife ecologists from Vetmeduni Vienna, point out using the example of chronic kidney disease.
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Image: an emotional state mainly activates wide, overlapping neural networks; Copyright: Heini Saarimäki

Love and fear are visible across the brain instead of being restricted to any brain region

20/02/2018

The brain mechanisms of basic emotions such as anger and happiness are fairly similar across people. Differences are greater in social emotions, such as gratitude and contempt.
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Image: a group of doctors standing next to a collection of surgical instruments; Copyright: panthermedia.net/satyrenko

Amyloid protein transmission through neurosurgery

19/02/2018

Amyloid beta pathology - protein deposits in the brain - might have been transmitted by contaminated neurosurgical instruments, suggests a new UCL-led study.
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Image: strand of human DNA; Copyright: Med Uni Wien

Stress-induced changes of genetic information: new details discovered about the function of a mysterious protein

19/02/2018

In a recent study, a research group at MedUni Vienna has published further details about the function of an enigmatic protein. The biological necessity of this protein, which can chemically alter certain building blocks of the genetic information, has been debated for quite a while.
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Image: colours on a black background - cells under the microscope; Copyright: UZH

Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

16/02/2018

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.
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Image: man at the desk who rubs his eyes tiredly; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Amaviael

Untimely immune cell clocks may contribute to obesity and diabetes in shift workers

15/02/2018

About 15 million Americans don't have a typical nine-to-five workday, and many of these - nurses, firefighters and flight attendants, among many other professions - may see their schedule change drastically one week to the next.
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Image: two men in front of a building; Copyright: University of Delaware/ Julie Stewart

Starving liver cancer

14/02/2018

Scientists at the University of Delaware and the University of Illinois at Chicago have found a new way to kill liver cancer cells and inhibit tumor growth. First, they silence a key cellular enzyme, and then they add a powerful drug. They describe their methods in a new paper published in Nature Communications.
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Image: VEGF stimulates the formation of sprouts on the vessel; Copyright: 2018 Yukiko Matsunaga, Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo

Blood vessel-on-a-chips show anti-cancer drug effects in human cells

09/02/2018

Researchers at the Institute of Industrial Science (IIS), the University of Tokyo, CNRS and INSERM, report a new organ-on-a-chip technology for the study of blood vessel formation and drugs targeting this event.
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Image: scientist in protective clothing working in a laboratory; Copyright: panthermedia.net/dolgachov

Ebola virus exploits host enzyme for efficient entry to target cells

09/02/2018

Researchers have identified a key process that enables the Ebola virus to infect host cells, providing a novel target for developing antiviral drugs.
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Image: red blood cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ras-slava

The amazing flexibility of red blood cells

08/02/2018

Super-resolution microscopy reveals fine detail of cellular mesh underlying cell membrane.
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Image: shell, that encapsulates the DNA of the hepatitis B virus; Copyright: Christopher Schlicksup, Indiana University

'Virus-cracking' molecules advance fight against hepatitis B

08/02/2018

Indiana University researchers have made an important step forward in the design of drugs that fight the hepatitis B virus, which can cause liver failure and liver cancer.
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Image: young woman holding a hand to her throat; Copyright: panthermedia.net/vonschonertagen

HPV may lurk in your throat

07/02/2018

Human papilloma virus (HPV), the culprit behind cervical cancer and some forms of head and neck cancer may hide in small pockets on the surface of tonsils in people not known to carry the virus.
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Image: The adenovirus (left) camouflages itself from the immune system thanks to its protective coat (right); Copyright: UZH

Stealth Virus for Cancer Therapy

07/02/2018

Scientists from the University of Zurich have redesigned an adenovirus for use in cancer therapy. To achieve this they developed a new protein shield that hides the virus and protects it from being eliminated. Adapters on the surface of the virus enable the reconstructed virus to specifically infect tumor cells.
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Image: two hands held up in the sunlight; Copyright: panthermedia.net/massonforstock

Ohio University study shows Vitamin D3 could help heal or prevent cardiovascular damage

06/02/2018

A new study conducted by Ohio University scientists suggests that a little more sunlight might help restore damage to your cardiovascular system.
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Image: digital screening mammography with fine calcifications (arrow) which resulted in the diagnosis of an aggressive preliminary stage of breast cancer; Copyright: UK Münster

Breast cancer discovered in its preliminary stages in mammography screening is usually aggressive

06/02/2018

In the biennial mammography screening programme, the most frequent diagnosis of breast cancer in its preliminary stages is, biologically, the most aggressive form. High-grade ductal carcinoma in situ holds the greatest risk of developing into a so-called invasive carcinoma.
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Image: little girl at the doctor's, coughing and holding a hand in front of her mouth; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ilona75

For children with respiratory infections, antibiotics with narrower targets are better

05/02/2018

CHOP researchers find outcomes are similar, but broader-spectrum antibiotics have higher risk of adverse effects.
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Image: transmission electron microscope image of negative-stained, Fortaleza-strain Zika virus; Copyright: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Repurposed drug found to be effective against Zika virus

02/02/2018

In both cell cultures and mouse models, a drug used to treat Hepatitis C effectively protected and rescued neural cells infected by the Zika virus - and blocked transmission of the virus to mouse fetuses.
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Image: green and red cells under the microscope; Copyright: Sue Menko, Thomas Jefferson University

The eye is not immune to immunity

01/02/2018

A person needs immune-suppressive drugs for organ transplants but not typically for transplants in the eye. How come? Like a few other parts of the body, some components of the eye, like the lens, don't have direct access to vessels that deliver immune cells. They were assumed to be places that immune cells couldn't go. They were immune privileged.
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Image: illustration of ewing cell death; Copyright: Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center

Cancer researchers hit a bullseye with new drug target for Ewing sarcoma

31/01/2018

Screening a class of recently-developed drug compounds, so-called CDK inhibitors capable of blocking CDK7/12/13 proteins, against hundreds of different human cancer cell lines, researchers at Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center have found that CDK12 inhibitors pack a particularly lethal punch to Ewing sarcoma, a rare cancer typically affecting children and young adults.
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Image: kidney; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Furian

The first step in generating an artificial adrenal gland

31/01/2018

In a new study, published in Cell Reports, researchers from the William Harvey Research Institute at Queen Mary University of London used cells derived from urine to take the first step in generating an artificial adrenal gland.
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Image: illustration of the molecular mechanism; Copyright: Aswin Mangerich, University of Konstanz

When the "guardian" and the "caretaker" of the genome join forces

30/01/2018

Achievement in the field of cancer research: Biologists and chemists at the University of Konstanz decipher a molecular mechanism of the cell with relevance for the development of cancer and the fight against that disease. Particularly important is the interaction between the tumour-suppressor protein p53, known as the guardian of the genome, and the enzyme PARP-1, the caretaker of the genome.
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Image: colorful, mosaically labeled embryonic heart; Copyright: Fabienne Lescroart

From stem cells to a functional heart: the role of the Mesp1 gene

29/01/2018

Researchers at the Université libre de Bruxelles and University of Cambridge identified the role of key gene Mesp1 in the earliest step of cardiovascular lineage segregation. This discovery may help to better understand congenital heart defects.
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Image: Arm, on which the gloves are glued with a plaster; Copyright: Esben Hansen

Unexpected helpers in wound healing

29/01/2018

Nerve cells in the skin help wounds to heal. When an injury occurs, cells known as glial cells change into repair cells and disseminate into the wound, where they help the skin to regenerate, researchers from the University of Zurich have shown.
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Image: a child getting vaccined; Copyright: panthermedia.net/belchonock

Nanoparticle vaccine offers universal protection against influenza A viruses, study finds

26/01/2018

Researchers have developed a universal vaccine to combat influenza A viruses that produces long-lasting immunity in mice and protects them against the limitations of seasonal flu vaccines, according to a study led by Georgia State University.
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Image: elderly man sitting in front of a birthday cake with a confused expression on his face; Copyright: panthermedia.net/luckybusiness

Lifestyle changes prevent cognitive decline even in genetically susceptible individuals

26/01/2018

Enhanced lifestyle counselling prevents cognitive decline even in people who are carriers of the APOE4 gene, a common risk factor of Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study published in JAMA Neurology.
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Image: Malaria mosquito sitting on a leaf; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Gucio_55

Promising malaria vaccine tested

25/01/2018

An international research team has conducted successful phase II clinical tests of a new anti-malaria medication. The treatment led to a cure in 83 cases. The new combination of drugs was developed by Professor Peter Kremsner of the Tübingen Institute of Tropical Medicine and the company DMG Deutschen Malaria GmbH.
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Image: illustration of human cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Jesper Klausen

How cells are able to turn

25/01/2018

Researchers have long wondered how our cells navigate inside the body. Two new studies, in which Lund University researcher Pontus Nordenfelt has participated, have now demonstrated that the cells use molecular force from within to steer themselves in a certain direction. This knowledge may be of great significance in the development of new drugs.
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Image: graph of periodontal disease severity; Copyright: Michaud DS et al

More evidence of link between severe gum disease and cancer risk

24/01/2018

Data collected during a long-term health study provides additional evidence for a link between increased risk of cancer in individuals with advanced gum disease.
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Image: smiling woman and littler girl with down syndrome; Copyright: panthermedia.net/DenysKuvaiev

The Down's syndrome "super genome"

24/01/2018

Down's syndrome – also known as trisomy 21 – is a genetic disorder caused by an additional third chromosome 21. Although this genetic abnormality is found in one out of 700 births, only 20% of foetuses with trisomy 21 reach full term. But how do they manage to survive the first trimester of pregnancy despite this heavy handicap?
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Image: hnRNPA2 protein forms liquid droplets in a test tube as seen by light microscopy; Copyright: Veronica Ryan/Brown University

Research reveals atomic-level changes in ALS-linked protein

23/01/2018

For the first time, researchers have described atom-by-atom changes in a family of proteins linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a group of brain disorders known as frontotemporal dementia and degenerative diseases of muscle and bone. Their findings appear in the journal "Molecular Cell".
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Image: illustration of a placenta with blood vessels; Copyright: OHSU

Zika virus damages placenta, which may explain malformed babies

22/01/2018

Study finds abnormalities and decreased oxygen levels in placenta during fetal development.
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Image: human skin with a plaster; Copyright: panthermedia.net/fmatte1

NIH scientists find microbes on the skin of mice promote tissue healing, immunity

22/01/2018

Insights may inform wound management techniques.
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"Spray-On" muscle fibers for biomimetic surfaces

08/01/2018

Few patients with heart failure are fortunate enough to receive a donor's heart. Ventricular assist devices (or heart pumps) have been around for several years and are designed to buy time as patients wait for a transplant. Unfortunately, the body doesn't always tolerate these devices.
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Image: interferometric detection of scattered light, iSCAT; Copyright: MPL

Interface between Physics and Medicine: new interdisciplinary center

22/08/2017

Physics has always supported medical science, especially when it comes to practical implementation. Now physicists and health professionals join in collaborative research at an interdisciplinary Center in Erlangen and incorporate fundamental principles of theoretical physics in their studies of diseases.
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Image: blood is taken from a finger and analysed by a blood testing device; Copyright:hes_so_valais_wallis

Without any delay: drug dose adjustment at the point of care

01/08/2017

Many therapeutic drugs are very powerful, but they are also very toxic at the same time. Thus, they have to be measured regularly, again and again, so that an adjustment of the individual drug dosage can be made. Until now, the "normal" way was to take the blood sample, send it to a central laboratory and get the results after some days. A new point-of-care test can measure it in 15 minutes.
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Image: An eye surgeon and an assistant are treating a patient with a surgical laser; Copyright: University Hospital Dresden/Felix Koopmann

Eye surgery: precision and prevention with femtosecond lasers

03/07/2017

Precision work is absolutely essential in eye surgery since the surgical site is very minute and sensitive. This is why eye surgeons have been using lasers for years. Femtosecond lasers are especially well suited to serve this purpose because they are able to cut tissue with great precision and little energy, which prevents unwanted side effects of surgery.
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Image: Zebrafish brain, fluorescence image (left) and 3D image (right); Copyright: private

"A 3D movie of the brain in action"

08/12/2016

Watching millions of neurons in the brain interacting with each other – for a long time this was possible only to a limited extent. The current techniques can visualize only superficial layers or the imaging they use is too slow. But now, Prof Daniel Razansky and his team have found a new method to visualize the brain activity – by using optoacoustics.
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Image: User interface of a software; Copyright: Helmholtz Zentrum München

Cell under observation: "The software lets us study the development on video"

08/08/2016

What happens when stem cells differentiate? What molecular characteristics do they have? Questions that can now be easier answered with the help of a new open-source software. We spoke with Prof. Fabian Theis at the Helmholtz Center Munich, who participated in the software development.
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Image: Closed eyes of a patient. Electrodes are attached above the eyebrows; Copyright: savir-center.com

Electrical Stimulation: Using Electrical Pulses to Combat Blindness

22/07/2016

Millions of people all over the world suffer from partial blindness – caused by glaucoma, a stroke or traumatic brain injury. For years, the loss of vision was deemed irreversible. But now a new treatment makes it possible to improve eyesight and vision.
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Photo: two physicians working at a test set-up

Atherosclerosis: Getting to the root of the problem with a turbo gene

09/02/2016

Many people suffer from atherosclerosis, especially in developed countries. The buildup of fatty deposits inside the arterial blood vessels leads to strokes and heart attacks. Now, a new method is designed to get to the root of the problem, and with the help of nanoparticles inject new turbo replacement cells into the blood vessels which are intended to exert their curative effect.
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Photo: pipette in petri dish

Great leaps forward thanks to new methods

01/02/2016

Self-healing powers like a superhero on the big screen? That’s the aim of regenerative medicine; at least in a very broad sense. This promising field of biomedicine is currently highly dynamic with innovative technologies and development. New methods are designed to help propel medicine into a whole new sphere.
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Photo: child with broken arm

Different specialties, one goal – treating children right

01/02/2016

Children, especially newborns, are generally no longer simply considered to be small adults whose treatment just needs to be "reduced". This is why a pediatrician’s education includes several specialties because ultimately everything in terms of care comes together here.
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From the periodic table of elements into medicine: silicon for theranostics

01/10/2015

Semiconductor nanoparticles for biomedical applications have been researched for some time now. Not only are they millionths of a millimeter in size, they also offer great potential for cancer diagnostics and therapy, so-called theranostics. They enter cells, are activated by ultrasonic radiation and destroy the cells using the generated vibration.
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Hospital crisis communication: A crisis knows no rules

02/03/2015

Crises come in many shapes and sizes. Whether it’s poor hygiene, thefts or treatment errors – once the crisis has arrived, things need to move quickly. For hospitals in particular, the right crisis communication is key. Yet many medical facilities still neglect the fact that crisis communication starts before the actual crisis takes place.
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Photo: Tissue sections on object slides

Digital pathology: From microscope slide to virtual microscopy

02/02/2015

The digitization of medicine moves on. Researchers, physicians and patients equally benefit from this development – thanks to improved diagnostics with highly sensitive devices, today findings can be comprehensively analyzed and treatment decisions made on a broadened basis. Digitization also offers the area of pathology interesting fields of application.
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Photo: interaction between the proteins

IBD: When genetics and environment interact

05/01/2015

T-cells are the guardians of our immune system. When they show changes, it can lead to severe inflammatory responses in the body. It is believed that the T-cells in persons who are affected by inflammatory bowel disease don’t work properly. Two proteins that can be found on activated T-cells and that interact with each other are now being analyzed.
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Wound treatment with fish skin

03/11/2014

The treatment of chronic wounds is extremely problematic. Chronic wounds can take months or years to heal and some even never heal resulting in over 100.000 amputations taking place annually in the US alone. A new technology from Iceland, that is based on fish skin and is already used clinically, allows for improved healing of chronic and burn wounds.
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Xenon magnetic resonance imaging: making pathological changes in the body visible

03/11/2014

As an imaging procedure, magnetic resonance tomography has become essential in clinical practice, since it can easily make organs and tissue visible. However, until now abnormal cancer cells or small centers of inflammation remained almost invisible. Now cell biologists from Berlin, Germany, have succeeded in fixing this problem with xenon magnetic resonance imaging.
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Photo: Dr. Anna-Maria Liphardt

Laboratory in Space: Hot on the Trails of Cartilage Degradation

01/10/2014

On November 10, 2014, astronaut Alexander Gerst will return to Earth from the International Space Station (ISS). He is not just anxiously expected by his family, but also by Dr. Anna-Maria Liphardt from the Institute of Biomechanics and Orthopedics at the German Sport University Cologne
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Cultured skin makes large-scale transplantations possible

01/07/2014

Large burns require skin grafting. Surgeons remove split-thickness skin grafts and apply them to the injured areas. Now skin that has been made in a laboratory is meant to help in covering burns as well as chronic wounds and thus promote the healing process. Researchers in Zurich have been working on this for more than 13 years.
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Diagnosing Parkinson's: the skin is revealing

01/07/2014

In patients with Parkinson's, neural cells in the brain die off that produce the neurotransmitter dopamine. Certain physical symptoms that can indicate the disease follow years later. But a reliable diagnosis can only be made through examination of the brain after the patient's death, and not during his lifetime.
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Fat is the best medicine: "Adipose tissue contains many multipotent stem cells, approximately 500 times more than bone marrow"

01/07/2014

The not so popular “love handles“ could revolutionize medicine in the near future. In cooperation with the University of Rostock (Professor Hermann Seitz), the human med AG Company currently seeks to develop a device that is able to gently remove adipose tissue during surgery and subsequently isolate stem cells.
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Surgery: "Our camera detects the tiniest remainder of a tumor"

03/02/2014

Differentiating tumor tissue from healthy tissue isn’t always easy for surgeons. Scattered cancer cells and early cancer are often hard to detect with the naked eye. A special camera now makes even the tiniest remainder of a tumor visible during surgery.
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