Leukaemia Cells Are “Bad to the Bone” -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

Image: person in protective clothing holding the sensor in his hand; Copyright: RMIT University

New detection sensor for type 1 diabetes

19/07/2018

Researchers are developing early detection technology for Type 1 diabetes that can accurately predict if a child is at risk of the chronic disease.
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Early detection: Tattoo signals cancer – and more

09/07/2018

People who are not ill and do not show any symptoms typically do not visit the doctor. And while most people know that preventive medical checkups for cancer, for example, are important, they still avoid them. They tend to be very hesitant because the doctor might detect a serious illness. In the future, a new type of implant could make it easier to go to a screening test.
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Photo: X-ray and MRI scan of a knee; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Bunyos30

Cell technology used to treat osteochondral knee defect

29/06/2018

A joint paper by Kazan Federal University and Tatarstan Republican Clinical Hospital appeared in Frontiers in Medicine. As the publication describes, autologous cells of stromal vascular fraction were transplanted to a 36-year-old man with the use of fibrin matrix. The patient, whose injury had been caused by a fall, then has been under supervision for 2 years.
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Image: Two examples of tissue shapes; Copyright: Stefano De Renzis, EMBL

Constructing new tissue shapes with light

28/06/2018

Constructing biological tissues, such as skin, muscle, or bone, in customized shapes is now one step closer. Researchers at EMBL have succeeded in guiding the folding and thus shape of tissues with optogenetics: a technique to control protein activity with light.
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Image: proteins in the nuclear pore complex; Copyright: California Institute of Technology

How 'gatekeepers' to a cell's nucleus let genetic instructions pass through

22/06/2018

New structural details emerge about one of the body's biggest protein assemblages, the nuclear pore complex.
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Image: AcCellerator research device at an exhibition stand; Copyright: Daniel Klaue, ZELLMECHANIK DRESDEN GmbH

Cells in the speed trap – diagnosis in a matter of seconds

22/06/2018

A drop of blood provides a lot of valuable information. However, it takes several hours to analyze the blood of a patient and make a diagnosis. This takes away a lot of time that's crucial for treatment. A new method intends to considerably speed up this process by testing the cells in the blood in terms of their deformability and immune response.
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Image: electron microscopy images confirm the deposition of an extracellular matrix; Copyright: University of Basel

Blood formation: researchers engineer human bone marrow tissue

21/06/2018

Researchers have developed an artificial tissue in which human blood stem cells remain functional for a prolonged period of time. Scientists from the University of Basel, University Hospital Basel, and ETH Zurich have reported their findings in the scientific journal PNAS.
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Study finds music therapy brings effective pain relief

21/06/2018

New study from University Hospitals Connor Integrative Health Network published in the Journal of Music Therapy.
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Image: nurse holding a brown dog in her arms; Copyright: Michael Bernkopf/Vetmeduni Vienna

Immunoglobulin E as a promising new form of anti-cancer immunotherapy

19/06/2018

If immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies are directed against harmless antigens such as pollen, the result can be an allergic reaction. However the original purpose of these IgE antibodies is to repel harmful exogenous substances rather than to trigger allergies.
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Image: left: mouse waiting for a reward for a short time; right: mouse waiting for a long time ; Copyright: OIST

Wait for it: Serotonin and confidence at the root of patience

18/06/2018

Serotonin keeps mice hanging on if they are sure of getting rewards, but not sure when.
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Image: S100A8/S100A9 protein complex (grey/beige) binds to the TLR4 receptor (rainbow-coloured) and MD2 (red); Copyright: Vogl et al./ J. Clin. Invest.

Münster researchers have discovered a possible new treatment for regulating inflammation

18/06/2018

Researchers at the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence have decoded a mechanism found at the beginning of almost every inflammatory response. Their study provides a new approach to develop novel treatment options for many inflammatory disorders with many fewer side effects compared to current drugs.
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Image: illustration of an eye ball affected by diabetic retinopathy; Copyright: panthermedia.net/megija

New pharmacological treatment against diabetic eye diseases is tested

15/06/2018

The so called "diabetic retinopathy" and the "diabetic macular edema" are two of the most frequent ocular diseases in patients with diabetes, and both feature pathologic changes of blood vessel functions in the retina. Experimental data and measurements in patients suggest that these changes in blood vessel functions may originate from a lack of vasoinhibin hormones in the retina.
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Image: illustration of an eye ball affected by diabetic retinopathy; Copyright: panthermedia.net/megija

Tuberculosis: clinical trials on a newly developed drug initiated

15/06/2018

The first antibiotic against tuberculosis that has been developed in Germany is now ready for clinical testing. BTZ043, as the newly developed drug substance is called, is also effective against multidrug-resistant pathogens which are increasingly challenging successful treatment worldwide.
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Image: scientist in the laboratory; Copyright: 2018 KAUST

The long and the short of DNA replication

14/06/2018

An unexpectedtwo-step mechanism occurs when cells copy DNA.
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Image: Emerging platelets (white arrows) are buded off by their progenitor cells, the megakaryocytes; Copyright: Rudolf Virchow Center of the Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

Targeting platelets

13/06/2018

A new Collaborative Research Center will start in July with a total funding of nearly 14 million euros, headed by the German Institute for Experimental Biomedicine in Würzburg. The aim is to decode the complex and insufficiently understood functions of platelets, the so-called thrombocytes.
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Image: plastic heart with a stethoscope; Copyright: panthermedia.net/shidlovski

'Multiomics' and the mouse heart - New insights into the development of heart disease therapeutics

13/06/2018

The heart of a neonatal mouse is capable of self-repair after tissue damage. However, this ability disappears during the first week of life. Researchers at the University of Helsinki investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying myocardial regenerative ability.
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Image: measles virus under the microscope; Copyright: Cynthia S. Goldsmith; William Bellini / CDC

Transmission of measles virus: Interaction with two cell receptors is required

12/06/2018

Researchers at the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut have reproduced measles virus transmission in an animal model. They were able to show that an efficient interaction with two cellular receptors plays a decisive role in the efficient transmission of the virus.
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Image: mountain tops covered in snow; Copyright: Dr. Daniela Flueck, University of British Columbia Okanagan

Scientists discover why heart function is reduced at high altitude

12/06/2018

For over a century, we have known that high altitude reduces the amount of blood the heart pumps around the body with each beat. New research published in The Journal of Physiology has unearthed why this is the case and the findings will be important for people who live, travel and exercise at high altitudes.
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How does alcohol influence the development of Alzheimer's disease?

11/06/2018

Research from the University of Illinois at Chicago has found that some of the genes affected by alcohol and inflammation are also implicated in processes that clear amyloid beta - the protein that forms globs of plaques in the brain and which contributes to neuronal damage and the cognitive impairment associated with Alzheimer's disease.
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Image: histological image of colon sections from mice that received T cells from CD4-creERafl/fl mice; Copyright: University of Turku

Estrogen and T cell immune response linked to autoimmune inflammation

11/06/2018

Women are more prone to the development of autoimmune diseases. The female hormone estrogen is likely to affect the immune system. A team of scientists from Turku Center for Biotechnology and University of Georgia reported new findings related to the involvement of estrogen hormone receptor in autoimmune diseases.
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Image: Microscopic colour image showing cells with normal (green dots) and abnormal (yellow dots) stress granules; Copyright: Team Buchberger

The big clean up after stress

05/06/2018

When cells become stressed, they activate specific response patterns. Würzburg researchers have identified new details of these responses, which can help to get a better understanding of neurodegenerative diseases.
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Image: 3D structure of the enzymatic active part of SdeA toxin; Copyright: Nature/Kalayil et al

Complementing conventional antibiotics

05/06/2018

Antimicrobial resistance is a major medical problem worldwide, impacting both human health and economic well-being. A new strategy for fighting bacteria has now been reported in the latest online issue of Nature by a research group headed by Prof. Dikic at the Goethe University Frankfurt. The scientists revealed the molecular action mechanism of a Legionella toxin and developed a first inhibitor.
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Image: pregnant woman wearing a light pink shirt; Copyright: panthermedia.net/EugeneGensyurovksy

Vast majority of poor, urban women don't use prenatal vitamins

01/06/2018

A study of more than 7,000 low-income, urban mothers enrolled in the Boston Birth Cohort found that fewer than 5 percent of them started folic acid supplementation and used it almost daily before pregnancy, a widely recommended public health measure designed to prevent potentially crippling birth defects.
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Image: transparent human torso, kidney highlighted in red; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sciencepics

CU researchers offer insights into liver disease caused by intravenous nutrition

01/06/2018

Research by physician-scientists at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus offers hope for improved quality of life for people who rely on intravenous nutrition due to intestinal damage.
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Image: blood vessel and red blood cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net/the_lightwriter

The vessel not taken: understanding disproportionate blood flow

31/05/2018

Considering the size of red blood cells, a new model for blood flow sheds light on why blood sometimes prefers some vessels over others.
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More frequent checks control MRSA in newborns, but can hospitals afford them?

29/05/2018

The more often a hospital can check its newborns for deadly MRSA germs, the more likely it will be that they are contained, according to a new study.
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Eating at night, sleeping by day swiftly alters key blood proteins

28/05/2018

Proteins involved in metabolism, immunity disrupted after just one simulated night shift.
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Image: semaphorin 6D reverse signaling controls lipid metabolism and anti-inflammatory polarization; Copyright: Osaka University

Neuron guidance factor found to play a key role in immune cell function

25/05/2018

Macrophages are white blood cells involved in a variety of biological functions, from destroying infectious pathogens to repairing damaged tissue. To carry out their different roles, macrophages must first be activated and transformed into different subtypes. However, the mechanisms that lead to macrophage activation are not fully understood.
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Image: network of protein fibrills; Copyright: Claessens

Parkinson-related protein is 'tunable'

24/05/2018

Fibrils of the protein alpha-synuclein, that plays a role in Parkinson's disease, form a stiffer and stronger network in water, when temperature is increased. Researchers of the University of Twente show that this has to do with the water-repellent part of the fibres coming to the surface and interacting.
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Image: Clusters of MAIT cells in human blood and colon biopsies; Copyright: Department of Biomedicine, Tobias Rutishauser; Copyright: University of Basel

Human MAIT cells sense the metabolic state of enteric bacteria

18/05/2018

A little-explored group of immune cells plays an important role in the regulation of intestinal bacteria. Changing metabolic states of the microbes have an effect on defense cells at different stages of alert or rest, as researchers from the Department of Biomedicine at the University and University Hospital of Basel report in the journal Mucosal Immunology.
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Image: wooden spoon with fish oil pills; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sommaill

Symptoms of osteoarthritis lessened with simple changes to the diet

17/05/2018

One gram of fish oil a day could help reduce the pain of patients with osteoarthritis, a new study in Rheumatology reports.
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Image: smiling young woman - Laura Volpicelli-Daley; Copyright: UAB

Untangling brain neuron dysfunction in Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies

17/05/2018

A neuron model of Parkinson's disease and Lewy body dementias shows defects that could suggest treatments to halt or reverse cognitive impairments before the neurons die.
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Image: blood vessel with red and white blood cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net/vampy1

New insights into blood vessel growth

16/05/2018

Scientists at the Goethe University have discovered that single cells in the innermost layer of blood vessels proliferate after injury and in so doing make a significant contribution to the formation of new vessels.
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Hypertensive patients may benefit from folic acid supplements

15/05/2018

Patients with low platelet count and high homocysteine levels reduced first stroke risk by 73 percent with the B vitamin.
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Image: smiling young woman - Megha Padi, Ph.D., director of the UA Cancer Center Bioinformatics Shared Resource; Copyright: University of Arizona Health Sciences/BioCommunications

Unlocking cancer's secrets using the 'social networks' of cells

14/05/2018

Megha Padi, Ph.D., of the UA Cancer Center has developed a method for probing the genetic underpinnings of cancer and other diseases, which could lead to better treatments.
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Image: scientist holding up a test tube containing a pink liquid; Copyright: Medical University of Vienna

Combating cancer and infectious diseases with natural milk protein

14/05/2018

Researchers from the Institute for Hygiene and Applied Immunology of the Center for Pathophysiology, Infectology and Immunology at MedUni Vienna, led by Hannes Stockinger, have discovered a hitherto unknown function of the protein lactoferrin, which is primarily found in breast milk.
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Image: chemical structure in shape of an octopus; Copyright: Georgia Tech / Wu / Xiao & NYPL Digital Commons / Brumfield

Chemical octopus catches sneaky cancer clues, trace glycoproteins

10/05/2018

Cancer drops sparse chemical hints of its presence early on, but unfortunately, many of them are in a class of biochemicals that could not be detected thoroughly, until now. Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have engineered a chemical trap that exhaustively catches what are called glycoproteins, including minuscule traces that have previously escaped detection.
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Image: Drs. Babak Baban (from left), Jack Yu and Jatinder Bhatia in the Children's Hospital of Georgia's NICU; Copyright: Phil Jones, Senior Photographer, Augusta University

SWAT team of immune cells found in mother's milk

08/05/2018

Immune cells that are ready to take action against invaders like bacteria have been found in women's breast milk, researchers say. They say the presence of this SWAT team of immune cells called innate lymphoid cells, or ILCs, in human breast milk is more evidence of the benefits of breastfeeding.
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Image: vessels of the retina; Copyright: Michael Chiang/OHSU

AI better than most human experts at detecting cause of preemie blindness

03/05/2018

New algorithm could help overcome shortage of physicians trained in disease diagnosis.
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Image: Three-dimensional structures of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor; Copyright: Hibbs Lab, UT Southwestern Medical Center

Cryo-EM structures of the nicotine receptor may lead to new therapies for addiction

03/05/2018

UT Southwestern researchers today published in Nature atomic-scale blueprints of the most abundant class of brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. A structural understanding of the protein, found in neurons, could lead to new ways to treat nicotine addiction from smoking and vaping.
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Image: Hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) differentiated from the stem cells of patients with hemophilia B show very low levels of clotting factor IX, or FIX, shown in white; Copyright: Salk Institute

Single injection treats hemophilia B for life, in proof-of-concept study

02/05/2018

For most people with hemophilia B, whose bodies can't properly form blood clots, constant injections to replenish their clotting factors are a way of life.
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Penn Medicine-led study reveals potential for more precise diagnosis and treatment of TBI

01/05/2018

New study presented at American Academy of Neurology Annual Meeting.
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Higher aerobic fitness levels are associated with better word production skills in healthy older adults

01/05/2018

Healthy older people who exercise regularly are less inclined to struggle to find words to express themselves, research led by the University of Birmingham has discovered.
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Novel discoveries on aggressive NK-cell leukemia

26/04/2018

International research consortium led by researchers from the University of Helsinki, Finland, discovered new information related to a rare form of leukemia called aggressive NK-cell leukemia. Potential new treatment options were found which are highly warranted as currently this disease usually leads to rapid death of patients. The study was published in Nature Communications.
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Image: Florescent cells in the prelimbic prefrontal cortex brain regions, with inset; Copyright: Andrew Moberly, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania

Fight, flight, or freeze

26/04/2018

"Take a deep breath" is the mantra of every anxiety-reducing advice list ever written. And for good reason. There's increasing physiological evidence connecting breathing patterns with the brain regions that control mood and emotion.
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Eating more fish could prevent Parkinson's disease

25/04/2018

A new study from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, shines more light on the link between consumption of fish and better long-term neurological health. Parvalbumin, a protein found in great quantities in several different fish species, has been shown to help prevent the formation of certain protein structures closely associated with Parkinson's disease.
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Our genes dictate who develops an allergy

24/04/2018

Whether or not you develop an allergy is largely dependent upon genetic factors. This is the main finding of a study recently published in EBioMedicine, just in time for World Allergy Week (22-28. April 2018). The study was supervision of Winfried F. Pickl from MedUni Vienna's Institute of Immunology.
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Image: bright colours that flow into each other: illustration of EMT; Copyright: Université libre de Bruxelles

Cancer: Tumor transition states

24/04/2018

Tumor heterogeneity describes the differences between different cells within a given tumor. These differences have major implications for the diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy of cancer patients. Different mechanisms have been proposed to account for tumor heterogeneity such as epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT).
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Image: two men in the laboratory, one sitting at a microscope or similar, another standing behind him; Copyright: RUB, Kramer

Cancer drug observed at work

23/04/2018

Using a Raman microscope, researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have studied at which targets the cancer drug Neratinib binds in cells and how its chemical structure changes. Compared with other techniques, this method offers a considerable advantage, as it is not necessary to apply a label to the drug that would indicate its distribution indirectly; rather, the drug itself can be monitored.
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Image: Mouse cells with (left) or without (right) DOR protein in green and blue ob black ground; Copyright: M. Romero, IRB Barcelona

DOR protein deficiency favours the development of obesity

23/04/2018

Obesity is a world health problem since excessive accumulation of fat tissue (or adipose tissue) increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes and some types of cancer. However, some obese individuals are less susceptible to these conditions.
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Image: Two hands are holding a tubular frame that is carrying a glistening wet, white tube; Copyright: Leibniz University of Hanover/Institute of Technical Chemistry

Tissue engineering: how to grow a bypass

23/04/2018

A bypass is a complicated structure. It is either made of synthetic materials that can cause blood clots and infections or created by using the patient’s veins. However, the latter often does not yield adequate material. A newly developed bioreactor could solve this problem in the future. It is designed to tissue engineer vascular grafts by using the body’s own material.
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Image: toddler who gets vaccinated in the arms of a nurse; Copyright: panthermedia.net/evgenyataman

European Immunization Week 2018 – the right to be protected or the duty to protect?

23/04/2018

The European Immunization Week's general slogan "Prevent. Protect. Immunize" is more relevant than ever in times of globalization and migration. It is a political and structural challenge to give as many people as possible access to vaccination. But even the best care is of no use if the individual does not recognize his or her duty to society.
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Image: Abnormally activated astrocytes were accumulated in the lesion of ALS mouse without TRIF signaling; Copyright: Koji Yamanaka

Innate immune adaptor TRIF confers neuroprotection in ALS mice by eliminating abnormal glial cells

20/04/2018

Researchers led by Nagoya University revealed that deficiency of the innate immune adaptor TRIF significantly shortened survival time of ALS mice.
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Image: yellow tape measure with capsules in front of it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Jiri Hera

Personalized cancer medicine: customized treatment

01/03/2018

Everyone is different. This statement also applies to our health. Cancer, in particular, can look and progress differently depending on the individual person. That’s why every patient ideally also needs a customized treatment that is tailored to their individual needs. But how feasible is this idea?
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Image: a container with the nutrient medium for cancer cells; Copyright: Dr. Markus Wehland

Cells in space – extraterrestrial approaches in cancer research

22/02/2018

Here on Earth, all experiments are bound by gravitation. Yet, freed from gravity's grip, tumor cells, for example, behave in an entirely different way. As part of the "Thyroid Cancer Cells in Space" project by the University of Magdeburg, smartphone-sized containers carrying poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells are sent into space.
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"Spray-On" muscle fibers for biomimetic surfaces

08/01/2018

Few patients with heart failure are fortunate enough to receive a donor's heart. Ventricular assist devices (or heart pumps) have been around for several years and are designed to buy time as patients wait for a transplant. Unfortunately, the body doesn't always tolerate these devices.
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Image: interferometric detection of scattered light, iSCAT; Copyright: MPL

Interface between Physics and Medicine: new interdisciplinary center

22/08/2017

Physics has always supported medical science, especially when it comes to practical implementation. Now physicists and health professionals join in collaborative research at an interdisciplinary Center in Erlangen and incorporate fundamental principles of theoretical physics in their studies of diseases.
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Image: blood is taken from a finger and analysed by a blood testing device; Copyright:hes_so_valais_wallis

Without any delay: drug dose adjustment at the point of care

01/08/2017

Many therapeutic drugs are very powerful, but they are also very toxic at the same time. Thus, they have to be measured regularly, again and again, so that an adjustment of the individual drug dosage can be made. Until now, the "normal" way was to take the blood sample, send it to a central laboratory and get the results after some days. A new point-of-care test can measure it in 15 minutes.
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Image: An eye surgeon and an assistant are treating a patient with a surgical laser; Copyright: University Hospital Dresden/Felix Koopmann

Eye surgery: precision and prevention with femtosecond lasers

03/07/2017

Precision work is absolutely essential in eye surgery since the surgical site is very minute and sensitive. This is why eye surgeons have been using lasers for years. Femtosecond lasers are especially well suited to serve this purpose because they are able to cut tissue with great precision and little energy, which prevents unwanted side effects of surgery.
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Image: Zebrafish brain, fluorescence image (left) and 3D image (right); Copyright: private

"A 3D movie of the brain in action"

08/12/2016

Watching millions of neurons in the brain interacting with each other – for a long time this was possible only to a limited extent. The current techniques can visualize only superficial layers or the imaging they use is too slow. But now, Prof Daniel Razansky and his team have found a new method to visualize the brain activity – by using optoacoustics.
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Image: User interface of a software; Copyright: Helmholtz Zentrum München

Cell under observation: "The software lets us study the development on video"

08/08/2016

What happens when stem cells differentiate? What molecular characteristics do they have? Questions that can now be easier answered with the help of a new open-source software. We spoke with Prof. Fabian Theis at the Helmholtz Center Munich, who participated in the software development.
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Image: Closed eyes of a patient. Electrodes are attached above the eyebrows; Copyright: savir-center.com

Electrical Stimulation: Using Electrical Pulses to Combat Blindness

22/07/2016

Millions of people all over the world suffer from partial blindness – caused by glaucoma, a stroke or traumatic brain injury. For years, the loss of vision was deemed irreversible. But now a new treatment makes it possible to improve eyesight and vision.
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Photo: two physicians working at a test set-up

Atherosclerosis: Getting to the root of the problem with a turbo gene

09/02/2016

Many people suffer from atherosclerosis, especially in developed countries. The buildup of fatty deposits inside the arterial blood vessels leads to strokes and heart attacks. Now, a new method is designed to get to the root of the problem, and with the help of nanoparticles inject new turbo replacement cells into the blood vessels which are intended to exert their curative effect.
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Photo: pipette in petri dish

Great leaps forward thanks to new methods

01/02/2016

Self-healing powers like a superhero on the big screen? That’s the aim of regenerative medicine; at least in a very broad sense. This promising field of biomedicine is currently highly dynamic with innovative technologies and development. New methods are designed to help propel medicine into a whole new sphere.
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Photo: child with broken arm

Different specialties, one goal – treating children right

01/02/2016

Children, especially newborns, are generally no longer simply considered to be small adults whose treatment just needs to be "reduced". This is why a pediatrician’s education includes several specialties because ultimately everything in terms of care comes together here.
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From the periodic table of elements into medicine: silicon for theranostics

01/10/2015

Semiconductor nanoparticles for biomedical applications have been researched for some time now. Not only are they millionths of a millimeter in size, they also offer great potential for cancer diagnostics and therapy, so-called theranostics. They enter cells, are activated by ultrasonic radiation and destroy the cells using the generated vibration.
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Hospital crisis communication: A crisis knows no rules

02/03/2015

Crises come in many shapes and sizes. Whether it’s poor hygiene, thefts or treatment errors – once the crisis has arrived, things need to move quickly. For hospitals in particular, the right crisis communication is key. Yet many medical facilities still neglect the fact that crisis communication starts before the actual crisis takes place.
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Photo: Tissue sections on object slides

Digital pathology: From microscope slide to virtual microscopy

02/02/2015

The digitization of medicine moves on. Researchers, physicians and patients equally benefit from this development – thanks to improved diagnostics with highly sensitive devices, today findings can be comprehensively analyzed and treatment decisions made on a broadened basis. Digitization also offers the area of pathology interesting fields of application.
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Photo: interaction between the proteins

IBD: When genetics and environment interact

05/01/2015

T-cells are the guardians of our immune system. When they show changes, it can lead to severe inflammatory responses in the body. It is believed that the T-cells in persons who are affected by inflammatory bowel disease don’t work properly. Two proteins that can be found on activated T-cells and that interact with each other are now being analyzed.
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Wound treatment with fish skin

03/11/2014

The treatment of chronic wounds is extremely problematic. Chronic wounds can take months or years to heal and some even never heal resulting in over 100.000 amputations taking place annually in the US alone. A new technology from Iceland, that is based on fish skin and is already used clinically, allows for improved healing of chronic and burn wounds.
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Xenon magnetic resonance imaging: making pathological changes in the body visible

03/11/2014

As an imaging procedure, magnetic resonance tomography has become essential in clinical practice, since it can easily make organs and tissue visible. However, until now abnormal cancer cells or small centers of inflammation remained almost invisible. Now cell biologists from Berlin, Germany, have succeeded in fixing this problem with xenon magnetic resonance imaging.
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Photo: Dr. Anna-Maria Liphardt

Laboratory in Space: Hot on the Trails of Cartilage Degradation

01/10/2014

On November 10, 2014, astronaut Alexander Gerst will return to Earth from the International Space Station (ISS). He is not just anxiously expected by his family, but also by Dr. Anna-Maria Liphardt from the Institute of Biomechanics and Orthopedics at the German Sport University Cologne
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Cultured skin makes large-scale transplantations possible

01/07/2014

Large burns require skin grafting. Surgeons remove split-thickness skin grafts and apply them to the injured areas. Now skin that has been made in a laboratory is meant to help in covering burns as well as chronic wounds and thus promote the healing process. Researchers in Zurich have been working on this for more than 13 years.
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Diagnosing Parkinson's: the skin is revealing

01/07/2014

In patients with Parkinson's, neural cells in the brain die off that produce the neurotransmitter dopamine. Certain physical symptoms that can indicate the disease follow years later. But a reliable diagnosis can only be made through examination of the brain after the patient's death, and not during his lifetime.
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Fat is the best medicine: "Adipose tissue contains many multipotent stem cells, approximately 500 times more than bone marrow"

01/07/2014

The not so popular “love handles“ could revolutionize medicine in the near future. In cooperation with the University of Rostock (Professor Hermann Seitz), the human med AG Company currently seeks to develop a device that is able to gently remove adipose tissue during surgery and subsequently isolate stem cells.
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Surgery: "Our camera detects the tiniest remainder of a tumor"

03/02/2014

Differentiating tumor tissue from healthy tissue isn’t always easy for surgeons. Scattered cancer cells and early cancer are often hard to detect with the naked eye. A special camera now makes even the tiniest remainder of a tumor visible during surgery.
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