Image: A woman doing breast screening; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Monkeybusiness

Clinics should choose women's breast screening appointment times to improve attendance

18/05/2017

For women who miss a breast screening appointment, giving a fixed date and time for a new appointment could improve poor attendance and be a cost-effective way to shift national participation trends, according to an analysis led by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).
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Image: A woman is sitting at the beach, putting some sun lotion on her shoulder; Copyright: panthermedia.net/haveseen

Skin cancer on the rise

17/05/2017

New diagnoses for two types of skin cancer increased in recent years, according to a Mayo Clinic-led team of researchers. Their paper, published in "Mayo Clinic Proceedings", uses medical records from the Rochester Epidemiology Project to compare diagnoses of basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma - both nonmelanoma skin cancers - between 2000 and 2010 to diagnoses in prior years.
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Image: A close-up picture of a big black mole; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sdigitall

Microscopic technique could help detect, diagnose metastatic melanomas

12/05/2017

The fight against skin cancer just got a new weapon. For years, melanoma researchers have studied samples that were considered uniform in size and color, making them easier to examine by more conventional means. But melanomas do not always come in the same shape and hue; often, melanomas are irregular and dark, making them difficult to investigate.
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Image: Graphic of a human brain with a tumor highlighted in red; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Sebastian Kaulitzki

Showing brain tumor firmness, adhesion before surgery

11/05/2017

It is not often that a fall saves someone's life. Helen Powell, 74, says that was the case for her. A computerized tomography scan that followed her fall revealed a cancerous brain tumor that led her to Mayo Clinic and surgery using first-in-the-world technology. Brain magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) imaging, showed the precise firmness of her tumor.
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Image: doctor checking the skin of a patient ; Copyright: panthermedia.net/goodluz

Melanoma: new unexpected key player identified

04/05/2017

Identification and functional validation of proteins involved in tumorigenesis are essential steps toward advancing cancer precision medicine. In The Journal of Clinical Investigation researchers now report the important role for FES in the initiation and progression of melanoma.
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Image: mouse tooth under microscope ; Copyright: Klein Lab / UCSF

Mouse teeth providing new insights into tissue regeneration

02/05/2017

Researchers hope to use stem cells to heal burns, patch damaged heart tissue, even grow kidneys and other transplantable organs from scratch. This dream edges closer to reality, but one of the enduring puzzles for stem cell researchers is how these remarkable cells know when it's time for them to expand in numbers and transform into mature, adult cells in order to renew injured or aging tissue.
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Image: A doctor's hand holding a sign with the word

Opportunities to overcome cancer treatment resistance

01/05/2017

A collaborative Cleveland Clinic, University of Oxford and Moffitt Cancer Center team of researchers has proven the theory that, while resistance to targeted treatment in cancer is truly a moving target, there are opportunities to overcome the resistance that develops.
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Image: A green network of nerve cells on black ground; Copyright: Dina Popova

Novel method to detect toxic effects of chemicals

28/04/2017

Traditional toxicological investigations performed on animals (in vivo) are expensive, time-consuming and may cause animal suffering. But research from Umeå University demonstrates that a neuronal cell model, derived from mouse, can be used to evaluate the neurotoxic effect of chemicals.
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Image: A women with a bald head and a headscarf, smiling, sitting on a sofa talking ot another woman; Copyright:Katharina Bia asiewic

Irreversible Electroporation – Last hope for liver cancer patients

24/04/2017

Liver cancer is the fifth most common malignant tumor in the world. The tumor can be removed through surgery or by utilizing thermal ablation techniques. If a treatment with conservative methods is no longer possible, there is an alternative: irreversible electroporation (IRE). The effectiveness of this method was now confirmed by a clinical study.
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Image: (Black and white picture) A young women with short hair looks with sad eyes out of a window; Copyright: panthermedia.net/prudkov

Second cancers deadlier in young patients

21/04/2017

Second cancers in children and adolescents and young adults (AYA) are far deadlier than they are in older adults and may partially account for the relatively poor outcomes of cancer patients ages 15-39 overall, a new study by UC Davis researchers has found.
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Image: A computer graphic of cancer cells attacking a healthy cell; Copyright: panthermedia.net/vitanovski

UTSA professor's study describes new way to predict tumor growth

19/04/2017

A new study by Yusheng Feng, professor of mechanical engineering at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), describes an algorithm that can predict the growth of cancerous tumors, which could help medical professionals judge the best treatment options for patients.
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Image: Doctor holing a sign that reads

Nanoparticles reprogram immune cells to fight cancer

18/04/2017

Researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have developed biodegradable nanoparticles that can be used to genetically program immune cells to recognize and destroy cancer cells -- while the immune cells are still inside the body.
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Image: Three scientists in a laboratory; Copyright: The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth)

New technology can detect tiny ovarian tumors

14/04/2017

Most ovarian cancer is diagnosed at such late stages that patients' survival rates are poor. However, if the cancer is detected earlier, five-year survival rates can be greater than 90 percent. Now, MIT engineers have developed a far more sensitive way to reveal ovarian tumors.
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Image: pink  light - child receiving radiation therapy ; Copyright: CHLA

Further reductions in radiotherapy to young children with brain tumors less successful

06/04/2017

A team of investigators has determined that young children participating in a clinical trial to assess the effectiveness of reduced radiotherapy did worse when there were deviations from the treatment protocol.
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Image: blood samples; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ktsdesign

New gene-based blood tests identify more skin cancers

03/04/2017

Genetic testing of tumor and blood fluid samples from people with and without one of the most aggressive forms of skin cancer has shown that two new blood tests can reliably detect previously unidentifiable forms of the disease.
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Image: Cluster of three circulating tumor cells; Copyright: Penn Medicine

Penn studies find promise for innovations in liquid biopsies

31/03/2017

From using fluid in the lungs to better understand the potential of immunotherapy treatments in lung cancer, to tracking circulating tumor cells in prostate cancer, to conducting RNA sequencing of cancer cell clusters from the blood of pancreatic cancer patients, a series of studies from the University of Pennsylvania demonstrate the promise of new diagnostic methods.
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Image: Man and woman standing in a lab; Copyright: Baylor College of Medicine

Novel approach can reveal personalized breast cancer treatments

29/03/2017

The goal of cancer therapy is to destroy the tumor or stop it from growing and spreading to other parts of the body. Reaching toward this goal, a team of researchers from various institutions, including Baylor College of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, has developed a new way to approach breast cancer treatment.
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Image: A graphic showing a correlation between errors in DNA and protein structure; Copyright: KIT

Big Data approach to predict protein structure

28/03/2017

Proteins are the molecular all-rounders in our cells. If they do not work properly, severe diseases, such as Alzheimer’s, may result. To develop methods to repair malfunctioning proteins, their structure has to be known. Using a big data approach, researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now developed a method to predict protein structures.
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Image: Graphical rendering of antibodies attacking cancer cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Ugreen

New drug delivery method for cancer therapy

23/03/2017

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have developed a new drug delivery method that produces strong results in treating cancers in animal models, including some hard-to-treat solid and liquid tumors.
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Image:blood phiole; Copyright: panthermedia.net / ktsdesign

Detecting blood clot risk using biomarkers

17/03/2017

Cancer is one of the hardest medical conditions to overcome, and for those who do so, the battle often does not stop at remission. Many cancers predispose patients to develop blood clots, particularly patients who are diagnosed at a late stage, which often complicates their treatment and reduces survival rates.
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Image: A dermatologist is examining the skin of a patient; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Goodluz

Study defines global burden of skin disease

15/03/2017

A study published in JAMA Dermatology combines the prevalence of skin diseases around the world with their likelihood of creating disability across the lifespan to define the following 10 most challenging conditions.
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Image: A nude female torso, a hand, holding a pink ribbon, is palced over her breast; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Tomas Anderson

Hormonal contraceptives and hair dyes increase breast cancer risk

10/03/2017

In her recent doctoral dissertation, researcher Sanna Heikkinen from the University of Helsinki and Finnish Cancer Registry evaluates the contribution of the use of hormonal contraceptives and hair dyes to the spectrum of breast cancer risk factors.
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Image: Computer-generated image of a human torso and an ultrasound scalpel; Copyright: Fraunhofer MEVIS

Ultrasound scalpel destroys liver tumors

10/03/2017

Focused ultrasound can effectively destroy tumor cells. Until now, this method has only been used for organs such as the prostate and uterus. At the European Congress of Radiology, Fraunhofer researchers will present a method, developed as part of the TRANS-FUSIMO EU project, that enables focused ultrasound treatment of the liver, an organ that moves while breathing.
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Image: A girl holding her arm, having pain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/teermanet thanomkiat

Functional brain training alleviates CIPN in cancer survivors

07/03/2017

A type of functional brain training known as neurofeedback shows promise in reducing symptoms of chemotherapy-induced nerve damage, or neuropathy, in cancer survivors, according to a study by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. The pilot study, published in the journal "Cancer", is the largest, to date, to determine the benefits of neurofeedback in cancer survivors.
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Image: Someone is cooking a healthy meal; Copyright: panthermedia.net/undrey

Lifestyle choices condition colon and rectal cancer risk more than genetics

07/03/2017

Researchers have issued the first predictive risk model of colon and rectal cancer based on data that combines genetic and lifestyle information. Their work, published by Scientific Reports, highlights the importance of improving lifestyle to reduce the risk of colon cancer and suggests to use a combination of lifestyle and genetic information to subdivide the population into different groups.
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Image: Nurse is vaccinating a young boy; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andriy Popov

Italy adopts gender-neutral HPV vaccination program

28/02/2017

The Italian government has changed its policy to allow both boys and girls to be vaccinated against Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) following advice from Kingston University London's Business School academic Prof. Giampiero Favato.
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Image: Three physicians during a meeting; Copyright: KiTZ/Philipp Benjamin

Children's Tumor Center: consolidated treatment under one roof

02/01/2017

Treatments for children need to be different from treatment for adults – this also applies in oncology. Having said that, children do not just need new and different treatment concepts that still necessitate research. They also require the support from their families, who need to be nearby during treatment.
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Image: A young girl is lying in the hospital bed, behind her a nurse is adjusting a monitor; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Monkeybusiness Images

Working with children with cancer – More than just a job

02/01/2017

Our topic title "pediatric (children’s) oncology" evoked strong emotional reactions from several mothers and fathers of our staff. "This hits too close to home for me, I couldn’t write about it", or "How do people manage to deal with this?". And we are only on the sidelines; physicians, caregivers and nurses at the hospital, hospice or families at home are the ones that have the real tough job.
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Photo: Old woman with a smartphone

Health Apps: "Mobile Applications for smartphones have strengths and weaknesses"

22/03/2016

Medical apps like diabetes or high blood pressure diaries are becoming increasingly popular with smartphone users. There are many available choices out there but they are not always clear. Added to this is the question of how the data collected by the apps can be sensibly incorporated into treatment.
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Graphic: The pancreas and the surrounding organs

Pancreatic cancer: diagnosis via signature analysis

08/03/2016

Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest forms of cancer because it is difficult to diagnose and only presents with symptoms in the later stages. In the future, a laboratory test developed at the Greifswald University Medicine could make an early detection of this type of cancer and consequently a faster and better treatment possible.
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Image: Esophageal Cancer

Esophageal cancer: increased patient safety thanks to the ”Da Vinci“ surgical system

09/11/2015

Interview with Professor Jürgen Weitz, Director of the Clinic and Polyclinic of Visceral, Thoracic, and Vascular Surgery, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus at the Technical University Dresden
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Fighting myomas with ultrasound

01/10/2015

A proper diagnosis is a part of great therapy. However, it can also be beneficial to be able to quickly respond to changes during a treatment. One example of this is the treatment of uterine myomas. Female patients at the University Hospital Bonn are treated using so-called high-intensity focused ultrasound, HIFU in short. Prof. Holger Strunk explains this procedure.
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From the periodic table of elements into medicine: silicon for theranostics

01/10/2015

Semiconductor nanoparticles for biomedical applications have been researched for some time now. Not only are they millionths of a millimeter in size, they also offer great potential for cancer diagnostics and therapy, so-called theranostics. They enter cells, are activated by ultrasonic radiation and destroy the cells using the generated vibration.
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Theranostics: Complex particles for tomorrow's medicine

01/10/2015

It is a portmanteau, a mixture of two words. This way it saves us time and trouble while speaking because the human speech apparatus is lazy. And it describes a mixture of procedures: the combination of two procedures that would normally be separate in medicine. We are talking about theranostics.
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Prostate cancer: Agent with theranostic potential

03/08/2015

Endoradiotherapy can be very unpleasant for cancer patients, since it does not only harm tumor cells, but also healthy ones. Sometimes, patients even need to stop therapy because of the side effects. Physicians and researchers are thus continuously searching for ways to transport radiopharmaceuticals directly and exclusively to their target.
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Photo: Image with red luminous bladder, next cystoscope

Making the invisible visible with fluorescence

22/06/2015

Bladder tumors have different growth characteristics. In most cases, they are limited to the inner wall of the bladder and thus well resectable. Unlike carcinoma in situ, which becomes muscle invasive after a certain amount of time. To be able to completely remove the tumor during resection, photodynamic diagnostics (PDD) can make sense.
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Cancer Immunotherapy: Individual mutations as new target structures

01/06/2015

A tumor is as unique as the person who is affected by it. For a long time, it was assumed this would make treatment more difficult since cancer drugs are not able to be one hundred percent effective in targeting the affected cells. In this interview with MEDICA.de, Professor Ugur Sahin explains why it is precisely these individual mutations that make him hopeful for a new type of therapy.
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Lung cancer: A blood test evaluates the effectiveness of therapy

01/06/2015

Can liquid biopsies become the new trend in cancer diagnostics? The medical world has asked this question for quite some time. The first globally approved liquid biopsy-based test for lung cancer shows that this can work. Yet further findings and research are still required to establish this less invasive method in diagnostics.
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Tumor markers: State-of-the-art diagnostics for personalized medicine

01/06/2015

When cancer is diagnosed, the terms tumor markers or biomarkers keep popping up. They describe characteristics that are not found in healthy persons. The classic tumor markers can be easily detected in blood samples or other body fluids. Other analysis methods require more effort. Yet they all share one thing in common: biomarkers indicate a potential tumor.
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Cancer prevention: Beneficial and ultimately personal

04/05/2015

There are many decisions to be made in an adult life; among them are cancer prevention screenings. They are voluntary and many people deliberate whether they should go or not and if they would actually want to know the results. Science, politics and health care professionals also ponder with each new preventive service whether it is beneficial and who should end up paying for it.
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Early cancer detection: "Physicians and patients need a good database"

04/05/2015

Whether it is a mammogram, colonoscopy or a skin cancer screening – after a certain age, we are subject to various early cancer detection screenings. Yet many of us don’t know that these screening tests are also associated with risks. This is something what Dr. Sylvia Sänger from the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf discovered in a study.
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Statutory Skin Cancer Screening: "This is not just about mortality rates"

04/05/2015

Since the end of April 2015, the long-awaited evaluation report on the skin cancer screening programs offered by German health insurance providers is now finally available. We spoke with Dr. Ralph von Kiedrowski, Board Member of the German Dermatologist Association (German: Berufsverband Deutscher Dermatologen) on what the screening can accomplish and his take on the G-BA report.
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Photo: Object slides

Tissue storage: "Our top biobanks are internationally leading the charge"

02/02/2015

Only projects with a solid foundation are successful in the long run. This is also true for science. Biobanks are the most important component of this foundation when it comes to fundamental biomedical research: Only high quality tissue samples that are stored there make conclusive research possible - for example in search of the causes of tumorigenesis.
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Xenon magnetic resonance imaging: making pathological changes in the body visible

03/11/2014

As an imaging procedure, magnetic resonance tomography has become essential in clinical practice, since it can easily make organs and tissue visible. However, until now abnormal cancer cells or small centers of inflammation remained almost invisible. Now cell biologists from Berlin, Germany, have succeeded in fixing this problem with xenon magnetic resonance imaging.
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KOHALA: digital student for cancer treatment

03/02/2014

Shortening a time-consuming procedure from four hours to five minutes and automate it at the same time sounds like a dream come true for employees in all fields and industry sectors. This dream could soon become a reality for radiologists. Software could take away the tedious processing of CT images, which is required before cancer radiation therapy.
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Radiology and technology: "Numerous phantom studies have been conducted that prove the advantages of this new CT system"

03/02/2014

Radiologists usually do their work after oncologists when it comes to cancer treatment. Yet modern radiology also provides treatments at this point. MEDICA.de spoke with Professor Stefan Schönberg, Director of the Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine at the University Medical Center Mannheim, Germany, about the use of a new computer tomograph and its benefits for patients.
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Surgery: "Our camera detects the tiniest remainder of a tumor"

03/02/2014

Differentiating tumor tissue from healthy tissue isn’t always easy for surgeons. Scattered cancer cells and early cancer are often hard to detect with the naked eye. A special camera now makes even the tiniest remainder of a tumor visible during surgery.
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Photo: Removal of a colon polyp with a snare

Endoscopy: "A small section of the colonic wall is completely removed"

05/01/2014

Eventually, all adults need to see a physician for colon cancer prevention. While the exam goes by quickly thanks to sedation, it sometimes leads to a follow-up procedure if a growth in the colon could not be removed with the endoscope and requires open surgery.
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