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Image: red dots on pink background: lipid accumulation in liver tissue; Copyright: Biozentrum, University of Basel

Liver cancer: lipid synthesis promotes tumor formation

15/12/2017

Lipid, also known as fat, is an optimal energy source and an important cell component. Much is required for the rapid and uncontrolled growth of cancer cells.
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Image: pregnant woman holding her belly; Copyright: panthermedia.net/jukai5

Amniotic fluid is a rich source of stem cells – that can now be harvested

15/12/2017

Amniotic fluid, the protective liquid surrounding an unborn baby, is discarded as medical waste during caesarean section deliveries. However, there is increasing evidence that this fluid is a source of valuable biological material, including stem cells with the potential for use in cell therapy and regenerative medicine.
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Image: purple luminescent shapes on black background; Copyright: Jacqueline Morris & Jaehee Lee, University of Pennsylvania

First DNA sequence from a single mitochondria

14/12/2017

DNA sequences between mitochondria within a single cell are vastly different, found researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.
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Image: parasite in the intestine viewed through a microscope; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Zinco79

Intestinal worms may solve allergy puzzle

14/12/2017

While young people with parasite worms currently have a four times higher risk for developing allergies and asthma than others. Their parents are generally unaffected.
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Image: green structure with pink spots on black background; Copyright: TU Dresden

Novel transcriptomic signature of type 2 diabetic islets identified

13/12/2017

Xenon gas was studied at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of Turku University Hospital, Finland in 2009–2014 as a treatment for minimising the damage of cardiac arrest, and now it enters drug development in spring 2018. NeuroproteXeon is advancing the study of xenon in a pivotal phase III trial.
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Image: chemical symbol for xenon on purple background; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Boris Zerwann

Xenon gas treatment studied at Turku University Hospital progresses into drug development

13/12/2017

Xenon gas was studied at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of Turku University Hospital, Finland in 2009–2014 as a treatment for minimising the damage of cardiac arrest, and now it enters drug development in spring 2018. NeuroproteXeon is advancing the study of xenon in a pivotal phase III trial.
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Image: image of a human body with highlighted lungs and respiratory tracts, in front of it fly allergens; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ingridat

New approach to predict respiratory allergy in early childhood

12/12/2017

A new study in EBioMedicine by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and the Medical University of Vienna, Austria suggests that immune response in early childhood to a handful of allergen molecules can predict the onset of allergic rhinitis and asthma in adolescence.
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Image: schematic of Mechanism of immune escape by P. falciparum; Copyright: Osaka University

Discovery of key molecules involved in severe malaria – A new target for malaria vaccine

12/12/2017

Malaria is one of three major infectious diseases affecting approximately 300 million people every year, accounting for about 500,000 deaths, but effective vaccine development has not been successful.
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Image: man in doctor's outfit holding a sign which says

How the cat parasite exploits immune cells to reach the brain

08/12/2017

Scientists have previously shown that a parasite from cats can infect people's brain and affect our behaviour. Now, researchers at Stockholm University have discovered how the parasite takes control of our cells.
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Image: a man's clenched fist and a scared woman in the background; Copyright: panthermedia.net/lofilolo

From grandmother to grandchild:

08/12/2017

Professor Thomas Elbert’s research team confirms epigenetic effects of having experienced violence.
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Image: Val223 and Phe258 of SPP interact with the inhibitors for SPP and γ-secretase. (Lower panel) The inhibitor prevents proliferation of protozoa in toxoplasma infect ; Copyright: Osaka University

Dibenzoazepine defender: Drug found to be effective against resistant Hepatitis C

07/12/2017

Osaka University researchers identify class of chemicals that can combat resistant strains of the hepatitis C virus, as well as parasites that cause malaria and toxoplasmosis.
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Image: Injection: Via a cannula introduced into the infarction area, the cells loaded with magnetic nanoparticles are injected into the damaged heart muscle ; Copyright: Dr. Annika Ottersbach/Uni Bonn

Fighting myocardial infarction with nanoparticle tandems

06/12/2017

How can damaged cardiac tissue following a heart attack best be treated with replacement muscle cells? A research team under the supervision of the University of Bonn is now presenting an innovative method on mice: Muscle replacement cells, which are to take over the function of the damaged tissue, are loaded with magnetic nanoparticles.
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Image: sign warning of child obesity, surrounded by the burned edges of a sheet of paper; Copyright: panthermedia.net/alexskopje

Harmful effects of being overweight underestimated

06/12/2017

Study measured effects of high and low BMI in 60,000 parents and children.
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Image: illustration of a human figure surrounded by cells and blood cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net/lightsource

An anti-aging protein could be targeted to rejuvenate immune cells

05/12/2017

New study explains what happens when the immune system ages.
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Image: depressed person sitting on a bench; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ikurucan

Researchers find link between excessive screen time and suicide risk

05/12/2017

New research presents compelling evidence that the more time teenagers spend on smartphones and other electronic screens, the more likely they are to feel depressed and think about, or attempt, suicide.
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Image: signs showing terms related to post-traumatic stress disorder; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Jacqueline2

Research finds patients with post-traumatic stress disorder respond differently to certain sounds

04/12/2017

Scientists at the Universities of Birmingham and Amsterdam hope to have found a new neurobiological marker to help recognise patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
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Image: human oesophagus with a tumor; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Eraxion

Researchers ID bacteria tied to esophageal cancer

04/12/2017

Researchers at NYU Langone Health's Perlmutter Cancer Center report that at least three kinds of bacteria in the mouths of Americans may heighten or lower their risk of developing esophageal cancer.
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Image: different coloured pills; Copyright: panthermedia.net/bdspn74

Antibiotics resistance: researchers succeed to block genes of resistance

01/12/2017

Antibiotics are commonly used around the world to cure diseases caused by bacteria. But as the World Health Organization and other international bodies have pointed out, the global increase of antibiotic resistance is a rapidly worsening problem.
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Image: The upper panel shows normal lung tumors, and the lower one shows lung tumors after RANK pathway inhibition; Copyright: IMBA

Women and lung cancer – the role of sex hormones

01/12/2017

Researchers at the Austrian Academy of Sciences’ Institute for Molecular Biotechnology (IMBA) have identified a remarkable connection between sex hormones and primary lung cancer. A medicine that has already been approved for osteoporosis and bone metastasis could now be used to prevent a particularly aggressive form of adenocarcinoma.
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Image: diagram with six representations of the brain; Copyright: University of Granada

Brains of children with better physical fitness possess greater volume of gray matter

30/11/2017

Researchers from the University of Granada (UGR) have proven, for the first time in history, that physical fitness in children may affect their brain structure, which in turn may have an influence on their academic performance.
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Image: Drawing of the human head, where one hand erases the brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andreus

To forget or to remember? Memory depends on subtle brain signals, scientists find

30/11/2017

The fragrance of hot pumpkin pie can bring back pleasant memories of holidays past, while the scent of an antiseptic hospital room may cause a shudder. The power of odors to activate memories both pleasing and aversive exists in many animals, from humans to the humble fruit fly.
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Image: red blood cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ras-slava

The HLF-gene controls the generation of our long-term immune system

29/11/2017

A research group at Lund University in Sweden has found that when the HLF (hepatic leukemia factor) gene –which is expressed in immature blood cells – does not shut down on time, we are unable to develop a functional long-term immune system. This could be a very early stage of leukemia.
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Image: diagram: interplay between 3D folding of DANN and epigenetic markers in cardiomyocytes; Copyright: Institute for Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology

3D folding of DNA provides important epigenetic mechanisms in the formation of cardiac muscle cells

29/11/2017

During differentiation of pluripotent stem cells to cardiomyocytes, the three-dimensional folding of the DNA reorganizes itself. This reorganization of the DNA architecture precedes and defines important epigenetic patterns.
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Image: breast cance cell; Copyright: University of California San Diego

Researchers discover specific tumor environment that triggers cells to metastasize

28/11/2017

A team of bioengineers and bioinformaticians at the University of California San Diego have discovered how the environment surrounding a tumor can trigger metastatic behavior in cancer cells. Specifically, when tumor cells are confined in a dense environment, the researchers found that they turn on a specific set of genes and begin to form structures that resemble blood vessels.
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Image: young man with glasses in profile, with gears and symbols drawn around his head; Copyright: panthermedia.net/olly18

Smart people have better connected brains

28/11/2017

Differences in intelligence have so far mostly been attributed to differences in specific brain regions. However, are smart people's brains also wired differently to those of less intelligent persons? A new study published by researchers from Goethe University Frankfurt (Germany) supports this assumption.
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Image: blowflies on plants; Copyright: NTU Singapore

Flies could help to monitor disease outbreaks by acting as 'autonomous bionic drones' suggest scientists

27/11/2017

An international research team led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have proposed that swarms of flies can be used to help monitor disease outbreaks. This follows their research that shows how whole communities of bacteria – known as a microbiome – can “hitch a ride” on common carrion flies and can be transferred to any surface where the flies land.
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Image: a row of small glass bottles, in one of them there is a syringe; Copyright: panthermedia.net/NikiLitov

Study opens new avenue in quest to develop TB vaccine

27/11/2017

A team of scientists led by the University of Southampton has taken an important step forward in research efforts that could one day lead to an effective vaccine against the world's deadliest infectious disease.
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Image: Complex highway intersection in a city area; Copyright: panthermedia.net/iofoto

Environmental factors may trigger lupus onset and progression

23/11/2017

While genetics play a role in the development of Lupus, a systemic autoimmune disease that can attack any organ system in the human body, so do environmental triggers, such as particulates in air pollution and ultraviolet light, explains Gaurav Gulati, MD, a physician-researcher at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine.
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Image: forearm bone which is scanned in the ultrasound hand scanner; Copyright: Fraunhofer IBMT

Using ultrasound for verification: proof of legal age via handheld scanner

22/11/2017

Human trafficking is a global crime that often preys on underage persons and forces them into prostitution and forced labor. In most cases, people are smuggled across borders with fake passports. Scientists at the Fraunhofer IBMT have now developed a non-invasive, handheld smartphone-compatible scanner that uses ultrasound to determine whether a person has reached full legal age.
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Image: head made of gear wheels which starts to dissolve on one side; Copyright: panthermedia.net/lightsource

Biomarker may predict early Alzheimer's disease

22/11/2017

Researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) have identified a peptide that could lead to the early detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The discovery, published in Nature Communications, may also provide a means of homing drugs to diseased areas of the brain to treat AD, Parkinson's disease, as well as glioblastoma, brain injuries and stroke.
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Image: soldiers' silhouettes in front of blue sky; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Veneratio

Brain chemistry study shows chronic fatigue syndrome, Gulf War illness as unique disorders

22/11/2017

Researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center have found distinct molecular signatures in two brain disorders long thought to be psychological - in origin chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and Gulf War Illness (GWI).
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Image: health workers tend to a patient in one of Sierra Leone's military hospitals; Copyright: Kawaoka Lab, UW-Madison

Unlocking the secrets of Ebola

21/11/2017

Scientists identify biomarkers that indicate likelihood of survival in infected patients.
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Image: the red aids ribbon and a globe; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Tim Rösner

Understanding the Berlin patient's unexpected cure

20/11/2017

A decade ago, the medical world was shocked when a patient in Berlin, Germany, had been declared free of HIV after receiving a stem cell transplant to treat cancer. Doctors have repeatedly tried to replicate the result, but this HIV cure has evaded other patients so far.
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Image: Animation of brain neurons synapse in human brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/vampy1

Novel technique explains herbicide's link to Parkinson's disease

17/11/2017

Northwestern Medicine scientists have used an innovative gene editing technique to identify the genes that may lead to Parkinson's disease after exposure to paraquat, a commonly-used herbicide.
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Image: Christina Gillmann with a laptop, showing the software; Copyright: Thomas Koziel

New software enables early diagnosis of arteriosclerosis

17/11/2017

Little exercise, fatty food and too many cigarettes – factors like these aid the onset of arterial calcification, also known as arteriosclerosis. Doctors are typically only able to diagnose the disease once it reaches an advanced stage. Computer scientists at the University of Kaiserslautern are developing a software program that will allow doctors to detect calcification earlier.
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Image: A newborn under EEG monitoring; Copyright: S Vanhatalo

Artificial intelligence to evaluate brain maturity of preterm infants

16/11/2017

University of Helsinki researchers have developed artificial intelligence software, which can evaluate the maturity of a preterm infant’s brain directly from an EEG.
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Image: Image shows the selective response of a subplate neuron to sounds; Copyright: Patrick Kanold

UMD neuroscientists identify source of early brain activity

16/11/2017

Brain cells that support early structural development also transmit sensory information; discovery could enable early diagnosis of autism and other cognitive deficits
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Image: Huaxi Xu, Ph.D., Professor, Neuroscience and Aging Research Center; Copyright: Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

How SORLA protects against Alzheimer's disease

15/11/2017

Researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) have identified a new protective function for a brain protein genetically linked to Alzheimer's.
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Photo: UBC Okanagan researcher Kathleen Martin Ginis and a wheelchair user; Copyright: UBC Okanagan

Specific exercise dosage for people with spinal cord injury

14/11/2017

For decades, the main message to keep the general population healthy was for everyone to get active. In fact, the World Health Organization laid out specific guidelines (150 minutes of cardiovascular exercise each week) on how much physical activity was required for people to maintain a healthy lifestyle.
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Image: Animation of structure of the sorting chip for sorting cells and particles with laser light; Copyright: Fraunhofer ILT, Aachen / aligator kommunikation

Fast Personalized Therapeutic Choices Thanks to the Light-Based Sorting of Biomolecules and Cells

14/11/2017

The "AnaLighter" analyzes and sorts clinically relevant biomolecules and cells in a blood test with light. As a result, physicians can make early diagnoses, for example, of tumor and cardiovascular diseases and initiate patient-specific therapies with great efficacy. Experts from Fraunhofer ILT will be presenting this technology at COMPAMED 2017 in Düsseldorf this week.
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Image: Dr. Bobby Thomas, Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University; Copyright: Phil Jones, Senior Photographer, Augusta University

New treatment direction sought in Parkinson's by blocking the blocker of a natural protection

13/11/2017

Oxidative stress plays a big role in the brain cell loss that occurs in Parkinson's disease. Now scientists have their sights on a protein that inhibits one of the body's natural protections against it.
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Photo: Man with a prosthesis and a researcher; Copyright: Marc Hall, NC State University

Study shows need for adaptive powered knee prosthesis to assist amputees

13/11/2017

New North Carolina State University research into wearable robotics shows how amputees wearing these devices adapted when presented with a real-world challenge: carrying a weighted backpack. The results could assist device manufacturers and clinicians expand the utility of these important devices, and could help researchers develop smarter controllers that adapt to real-world demands.
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Image: The L194P egg-adaptive mutation; Copyright: Wilson Lab

How flu shot manufacturing forces influenza to mutate

10/11/2017

Egg-based production causes virus to target bird cells, making vaccine less effective.
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Image: Newborn sleeping on the belly of its mother; Copyright: panthermedia.net/shapovaLOVEa

Wait a minute! Clamping the umbilical cord later saves preterm babies' lives

10/11/2017

Thousands of preterm babies could be saved by waiting 60 seconds before clamping the umbilical cord after birth instead of clamping it immediately - according to two international studies coordinated by the University of Sydney's National Health and Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Centre.
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Image: 3d illustration of viruses attacking nerve cells; Copyright:  panthermedia.net/ralwel

Research pinpoints powerful biomarker of multiple sclerosis

09/11/2017

A breakthrough study led by the University of Sydney's Brain and Mind Centre and Royal Prince Alfred Hospital has revealed unique molecules in the blood of people with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) that could become definitive diagnostic biomarkers of the world's most common neurologic disability in young adults.
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Image: 3d simulation of a cancer cell; Copyright:  panthermedia.net/vitanovski

Researchers find genetic pathways to individualized treatment for advanced prostate cancer

09/11/2017

Researchers at Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine have uncovered genetic clues to why tumors resist a specific therapy used for treating advanced prostate cancer.
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Image: Animation of a clogged artery; Copyright: panthermedia.net/chagpg

Bacterial fats, not dietary ones, may deserve the blame for heart disease

08/11/2017

Heart disease and fatty clogs in the arteries go hand in hand. But new evidence suggests the fatty molecules might come not only from what you eat, but from the bacteria in your mouth, report UConn scientists in the Journal of Lipid Research. The research may explain why gum disease is associated with heart trouble.
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Image: diagram of sulfur respiration; Copyright: Takaaki Akaike

Sulfur respiration in mammals

08/11/2017

A common sulfur metabolite having antioxidant activity appears to be formed with the help of an enzyme found in mitochondria, highlighting a potential area of research for future treatments of various diseases.
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Image: Surgeons during surgery; Copyright: UKR

Acute kidney injury: Early detection thanks to biomarker

08/11/2017

Major surgeries in the abdominal region often result in kidney injury in patients. Meanwhile, the clinical manifestations don't present until one or two days after the procedure. This causes physicians to lose valuable time to treat patients. The University Hospital Regensburg has researched a new concept for the treatment of kidney injuries for several years.
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Image: A piece of a meteorit; Copyright: panthermedia.net/njnightsky

Cancer cells destroyed with dinosaur extinction metal

07/11/2017

Cancer cells can be killed with metal from the asteroid that killed the dinosaurs, says a new research from University of Warwick UK and Sun-Yat Sen University in China.
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Image: A woman and a man in a spinning class; Copyright: University of Turku

High-intensity interval training alters brain glucose metabolism in insulin resistant people

07/11/2017

Researchers at the University of Turku, Finland, studied how high-intensity interval training (HIIT) alters the brain’s glucose metabolism in physically inactive insulin resistant people. Only two weeks of HIIT training reduced glucose metabolism in all areas of the brain.
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Image: Joanne Kurtzberg, M.D. works with a patient receiving an infusion of cells from umbilical cord blood; Copyright: Shawn Rocco/Duke Health

Umbilical cord blood improves motor skills in some children with cerebral palsy

06/11/2017

An infusion of cells from a child's own umbilical cord blood appears to improve brain connectivity and motor function in children with spastic cerebral palsy, according to a randomized clinical trial published this week by Stem Cells Translational Medicine.
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Image: Prof. Dr. Irmgard Förster (right) and Prof. Dr. Günter Mayer (left) with their team; Copyright: Volker Lannert/Uni Bonn

New approach for treatment of contact allergy

06/11/2017

An RNA aptamer isolated by scientists at the University of Bonn can effectively prevent allergic reactions in mice.
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Image: Structure of the plasma membrane of a cell; Copyright: panthermedia.net/vampy1

Noisy cell membranes

03/11/2017

Rapid information transfer is vital for the inner workings of body tissues. With computer simulations, researchers from Colombia and Germany found that mechanical pulses travel through membranes for biologically relevant distances at the speed of sound.
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Image: OP-Team at a operation; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Cancerus

Helmholtz spin-off SurgVision acquired by Bracco Imaging

03/11/2017

SurgVision BV, a spin-off of Helmholtz Zentrum München, has been acquired by the Milan-based company Bracco Imaging S.p.A. SurgVision has its own patented technology for fluorescence image-guided surgery, which enables surgeons to detect tumor tissue more accurately and thus to remove it with greater precision.
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Image: A surgeon with VR-Glasses in a OR; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia ltd

Noninvasive brain imaging shows readiness of trainees to perform operations

02/11/2017

While simulation platforms have been used to train surgeons before they enter an actual operating room (OR), few studies have evaluated how well trainees transfer those skills from the simulator to the OR.
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Image: Woman drawing a heartbeat diagram on a blackboard; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kbuntu

In the first year after a heart attack, Women have higher mortality rates than men

01/11/2017

Heart attacks pose a greater threat to women than to men. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has determined that in the first year after a heart attack women are subject to a significantly higher mortality risk than men with similar case histories.
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Image: 3D render of two connected puzzle pieces with the word diabetes and genetics on them; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Kagenmi

Novel histone modifications couple metabolism to gene activity

31/10/2017

Scientists of Helmholtz Zentrum München and Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich (LMU) have discovered that two new classes of histone modifications couple cellular metabolism to gene activity.
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Image: DNA-string; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Kiyoshi Takahase Segundo

Suicide molecules kill any cancer cell

31/10/2017

Small RNA molecules originally developed as a tool to study gene function trigger a mechanism hidden in every cell that forces the cell to commit suicide, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study, the first to identify molecules to trigger a fail-safe mechanism that may protect us from cancer.
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Photo: Two men in hospital during dialysis; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SimpleFoto

Relatively few kidney patients need to start dialysis after undergoing TAVR

30/10/2017

The rate of patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing a heart procedure called transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) who eventually need to start dialysis is relatively low, suggests a new study published in JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.
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Image: A magnifying glass enlarges the lettering ulcerative colitis; Copyright: panthermedia.net/vitanovski

More patients with ulcerative colitis but fewer surgeries

30/10/2017

Today, a higher number of patients with ulcerative colitis are able to keep their bowel and steer clear of surgery, as shown in a study from Örebro University. The research has also shown that the number of people suffering from the disease is 10 times higher today than in the 60s.
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Image: Graphic of how Zinc influences the pH-regulation in the brain; Copyright: Colourbox.com/JP Morth

Research finds that Zinc-binding is vital for regulating pH levels in the brain

27/10/2017

Researchers in Oslo, Norway, have discovered that Zinc-binding plays an important role in the sensing and regulation of pH in the human brain. The findings come as one of the first studies that directly link Zinc-binding with bicarbonate transporters.
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Image: Fluorescence microscopy images of blood vessels supported by perivascular cells; Copyright: Bern University Hospital/University of Bern

Possible new immune therapy target in lung cancer

26/10/2017

A study from Bern University Hospital in collaboration with the University of Bern shows that so-called perivascular-like cells from lung tumors behave abnormally. They not only inadequately support vascular structures, but also may actively modulate the inflammatory and immune response. These findings may represent a novel stromal cancer target.
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Image: Physician holding a sign saying

Workers at smaller companies less likely to be screened for cancer

26/10/2017

A new study by American Cancer Society investigators finds workers at organizations with fewer than 25 employees are less likely to have been screened for three cancers, as were people working in certain occupations. The study appears in Preventive Medicine.
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Image: Missael Garcia and Viktor Gruev; Copyright: L. Brian Stauffer

Mantis shrimp-inspired camera enables glimpse into hidden world

25/10/2017

By mimicking the eye of the mantis shrimp, Illinois researchers have developed an ultra-sensitive camera capable of sensing both color and polarization.
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Image: Multiple sclerosis written on a sign; Copyright: panthermedia.net/nevenova

Possible approach discovered for treating Multiple Sclerosis

24/10/2017

There is currently no cure for MS but, with appropriate treatment, it is possible to delay the typical progression of the disease. In collaboration with national and international researchers have now discovered in an animal model that the family of histone deacetylases (HDACs) plays a major role in the development of this type of autoimmune disease.
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Image: Concept health insurance; Copyright: panthermedia.net/garagestock

Obamacare helps reverse the decline in US trust

24/10/2017

Recent research from Umeå and Lund universities in Sweden shows that Obamacare might be key to reversing the trend of declining social trust that has plagued the United States since the 1970s.
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Image: Three-dimensional image of a colored vessel structure; Copyright: René Hägerling

Pathology: detecting lymphedema with 3D microscopy

23/10/2017

According to the WHO, 300 million people throughout the world are affected by lymphedema. This condition occurs when fluid that flows between cells is no longer transported back into the blood circulation and accumulates in the skin. Triggers can be surgeries, injuries or genetic defects for example. A new microscopy technique could now also indicate the causes.
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Image: Immune cells; Copyright: Park J. et al, Advanced Materials (2017)

Gel to fight rheumatoid arthritis

23/10/2017

IBS scientists developed a potentially therapeutic gel, which detects nitric oxide, absorbs excess fluids and delivers drugs.
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Image: A cryotherapy capsule; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Svetlana195

Study finds cold therapy may be effective at controlling cancer treatment side effects

23/10/2017

A new study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute finds that cryotherapy, specifically having chemotherapy patients wear frozen gloves and socks for 90-minute periods, is useful for preventing symptoms of neuropathy.
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Image: Laboratory technician holds a Petri dish; Copyright: Fraunhofer ITEM

Fraunhofer launches a pioneering collaboration with iCAIR project

20/10/2017

Bacteria keep developing new resistances to antibiotics. There is a desperate need for new medications. The biggest hurdle in developing these new medications is getting them from the laboratory and into clinical trials. iCAIR will use selected lighthouse projects to establish and demonstrate its position as an expert preclinical development platform for new anti-infective drugs.
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Image: Brain scans in comparison; Copyright: WCM

Menopause triggers metabolic changes in brain that may promote Alzheimer's

19/10/2017

Menopause causes metabolic changes in the brain that may increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease, a team from Weill Cornell Medicine and the University of Arizona Health Sciences has shown in new research.
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Image: A man is smoking a cigarette in the park; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia ltd

Treacherous correlation in the brain from smoking

19/10/2017

Out with the cigarette pack, put a cigarette in the mouth and light up. That is a well-known action for a smoker and, at the same time, behavior which has a stronger connection to actual drug dependency than was previously believed, research at the Sahlgrenska Academy has revealed.
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Image: thermal image of a mouse; Copyright: Nuria Matesanz, CNIC

A specific protein regulates the burning of body fat to generate heat

18/10/2017

Scientists at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III (CNIC) have identified a protein that holds promise as a target for therapies to reduce obesity.
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Image: A man sleeping; Copyright: panthermedia.net/vadimphoto1@gmail.com

Study asks whether one extra hour’s sleep can help manage weight and reduce fatigue

17/10/2017

A new study by sleep experts at Loughborough University is examining how sleep and weight management are related.
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Image: A volunteer receives an injection in the PREVAIL Ebola vaccine clinical trial; Copyright: PREVAIL

Experimental Ebola vaccines elicit year-long immune response

16/10/2017

Results from a large randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial in Liberia show that two candidate Ebola vaccines pose no major safety concerns and can elicit immune responses by one month after initial vaccination that last for at least one year.
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Image:Ben Godde, Professor of Neuroscience at Jacobs University; Copyright: Jacobs University

Halting the aging process - and defining it

16/10/2017

At the latest at the age of 30, everything starts to go downhill. For most people, this is when their brain starts to shrink in volume. That’s the bad news, the good news is that this aging process can be stopped by means of targeted training, movement and physical activity.
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Image: tools for blood testing; Copyright: panthermedia.net/gisne

Blood samples may provide patient radiosensitivity answers

13/10/2017

How much radiation or chemotherapy can a certain person handle? With help from blood or tissue testing, it may be possible to answer this question in advance, which in turn could improve treatment, as research at Sahlgrenska Academy shows.
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Image: young woman sleeping; Copyright: panthermedia.net/pressmaster

New insights into how sleep helps the brain to reorganise itself

13/10/2017

A study has given new insights into how sleep contributes to brain plasticity – the ability for our brain to change and reorganise itself – and could pave the way for new ways to help people with learning and memory disorders.
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Image: illustration of a cancer cell; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Sebastian Kaulitzki

Stanford-led study uncovers mutation that supercharges tumor-suppressor

12/10/2017

Cancer researchers have long hailed p53, a tumor-suppressor protein, for its ability to keep unruly cells from forming tumors. But for such a highly studied protein, p53 has hidden its tactics well.
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Image: abstract graphic about hereditary colon cancer; Copyright: IDIBELL

A new genetic marker accounts for up to 1.4 percent of cases of hereditary colon cancer

12/10/2017

The finding, once validated by other research groups, could allow patients with mutations in this gene to follow a clinical approach much more consistent with their genetics.
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Image: cross-section illustration of blood vessel; Copyright: panthermedia.net/alexmit

Likely new treatment target identified for diabetic retinopathy

11/10/2017

In oxygen-compromising conditions like diabetes, the body grows new blood vessels to help, but the result is often leaky, dysfunctional vessels that make bad matters worse.
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Image: proteins that stand guard at transmembrane channels in the walls of nerve cells; Copyright: Rice University/UTHEALTH

Nerve cells' gatekeepers take many forms

11/10/2017

Rice, UTHealth researchers use light-sensitive molecules to track proteins critical to cell signaling.
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Image: Immune cells are more activated (red) in the brains of mice with the gene TREM2 (left) than in those without the gene (right); Copyright: DAVID HOLTZMAN LAB

Alzheimer's gene poses both risk and benefits

10/10/2017

Study suggests role of inflammation in brain disease is complicated.
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Image: little boy falling asleep over his laptop; Copyright: panthermedia.net/WavebreakmediaMicro

Why do we fall asleep when bored?

09/10/2017

University of Tsukuba researcher discovers why we have the tendency to fall asleep in the absence of motivating stimuli, when bored.
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Image: new born baby with pacifier on a pillow; Copyright: panthermredia.net/hansenn

How the lungs of premature babies can undergo damage

09/10/2017

Premature babies that need ventilation to support their breathing often suffer from a condition known as bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Researchers at the Helmholtz Zentrum München, partner in the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), have now discovered a molecular mechanism that plays a key role in the development of the disease.
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Picture: two women perform exercises and are wired with electrodes; Copyright: University of Erlangen/Wolfgang Kemmler

Whole-body electromyostimulation training: fitness or prevention?

09/10/2017

Whole-body electromyostimulation (WB-EMS) promises time-efficient muscle strength training that has positive effects after just a few sessions per week. Its objective is a fast increase in muscle mass and reduction of body fat. Can WB-EMS training replace conventional strength and endurance training? And can it help to prevent diseases or pain?
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Image: microscope image of fluorescent cancer cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net/vshivkova

New approaches in targeted cancer therapy

06/10/2017

In a large-scale testing procedure, scientists from Cologne University Hospital have explored the effects of more than 1,500 substances on different kinds of cancer cells. The results from this study are a fundamental prerequisite for the development of new therapies for NMC, an aggressive cancer which is often lethal.
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Image: stacked pills; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Dieter Beselt

Even open-label placebos work – if they are explained

06/10/2017

For some medical complaints, open-label placebos work just as well as deceptive ones. As psychologists from the University of Basel and Harvard Medical School report in the journal 'Pain', the accompanying rationale plays an important role when administering a placebo.
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Image: doctor examines male patients with the magnifying glass for skin cancer.; Copyright: panthermedia.net/alexraths

Doctors gain a greater understanding of skin cancer using tattoos

05/10/2017

Cancer is on the rise and the need to be empathetic when giving a patient their diagnosis and throughout treatment is imperative. Now, a collaborative study, with a Huddersfield professor, has enabled future doctors to experience some of the challenges patients living with skin cancer can face to develop a greater empathy for their patients.
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Image: microscopic images of stem cells; Copyright: Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Amount of water in stem cells can determine its fate as fat or bone

05/10/2017

Adding or removing water from a stem cell can change the destiny of the cell, researchers have discovered in a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
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Image: clipboard with a diet plan; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andriy Popov

Brain cells that control appetite identified for first time

04/10/2017

Dieting could be revolutionised, thanks to the ground-breaking discovery by the University of Warwick of the key brain cells which control our appetite.
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Photo: A physician is taking a blood test from an elderly man; Copyright: Lancaster University

Breakthrough study reveals new diagnosis for Alzheimer's

04/10/2017

In the largest and most conclusive study of its kind, researchers have analysed blood samples to create a novel and non-invasive way of helping to diagnose Alzheimer's disease and distinguishing between different types of neurodegenerative disorders.
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Photo: A hand with the Gripfroce Box; Copyright: TU München

Determining motor deficits more precisely following a stroke

03/10/2017

After a stroke, many people are unable to successfully perform basic hand movements in everyday life. The reason are symptoms of hemiparesis resulting from damage to the brain. These very frequently affect fine motor skills. A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) is now paving the way to better diagnosis and more targeted therapy.
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Image: image of a transparent human upper body with blue lungs; Copyright: panthermedia.net/iLexx

COPD action plan shortens duration of flare-ups and reduces hospital admissions

03/10/2017

The University of Twente carried out the first study worldwide that shows patients with COPD (lung disease caused by smoking) and other illnesses (heart disease, diabetes, anxiety and depression) have better outcomes if they follow a self-management programme with a customised action plan. Anke Lenferink of UT recently obtained a doctoral degree on this subject.
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Photo: Physician checking the fractured hand of an elderly woman; Copyright: panthermedia.net/londondeposit

Seniors with Type 2 diabetes may have increased risk for fracture

02/10/2017

Though seniors with type 2 diabetes (T2D) tend to have normal or higher bone density than their peers, researchers have found that they are more likely to succumb to fractures than seniors without T2D.
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Image: man in suit jumps down steps; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Craig Robinson

Middle age fattens you up if you do not increase your physical activity

02/10/2017

The Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences at the University of Jyväskylä has examined how changes in the daily step count are related to changes in the body mass index (BMI).
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Image: Vials in a rack; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf

MEDICA 2017: all about laboratory medicine at the MEDICA LABMED FORUM

02/10/2017

If you are interested in laboratory medicine and come to the MEDICA 2017, you will quickly notice that Exhibition Halls 1 and 2 were demolished. A new state-of-the art hall is meant to take their place. Until then, exhibitors from the field of laboratory medicine will be showcased at their temporary new location in the lightweight hall structures 3a and 18 on the fairgrounds.
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Image: transparent human head, showing the brain and firing synapses; Copyright: panthermedia.net/the_lightwriter

Researchers of TU Dresden have pioneered a brain-network bio-inspired algorithm to predict new therapeutic targets of approved drugs

29/09/2017

An international team of scientists led by Dr. Carlo Vittorio Cannistraci, Junior Group Leader of the Biomedical Cybernetics lab at the BIOTEChnology Center TU Dresden, has developed a powerful computational method that can exploit the principles of brain-network self-organization.
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Image: blood cells in a blood vessel; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Eraxion

Fresh blood for damaged tissues via alginate hydrogels

29/09/2017

Biomaterial-mediated delivery of blood vessel growth factors could be used as a therapeutic strategy to treat peripheral vascular disease.
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Image: shaking hands of an elderly woman holding a glass of water; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Astrid08

Diabetes medicine reduces Parkinson's risk

28/09/2017

A Norwegian study shows that the taking of diabetes medicine reduces the risk of getting Parkinson's disease.
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Image: shaking hands of an elderly woman holding a glass of water; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Astrid08

Researchers hopeful they can improve techniques for joint defect treatment

28/09/2017

Different surface topographies and materials provide interesting ways to study cell behaviour and potentially provide novel solutions for treating joint defects. Tissue engineering methods that simulate native cartilage could prove useful to create cartilage implants in the laboratory, according to a doctoral dissertation from Umeå University.
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Image: teenage girl sleeping; Copyright: panthermedia.net/christoph_dieterle

Teens come jet lagged to school – shifting sleeping patterns at weekends

27/09/2017

A lack of sleep is associated with more absence and teens turn up jet lagged to school on Mondays, as shown in a doctoral thesis by sleep researcher Serena Bauducco, at Örebro University, Sweden.
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Image: woman holding a hand to her throat, which is marked red; Copyright: panthermedia.net/vonschonertagen

New treatment for chronic throat irritation and globus sensation in the gullet

26/09/2017

Chronic throat irritation, a permanent globus sensation, a sore or dry sensation in the throat are common symptoms, which are often trivialised and wrongly attributed to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. However, these are also the characteristic symptoms of patients suffering from displaced gastric mucosa in the oesophagus (ectopic mucosa).
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Image: electrode next to a cent piece; Copyright: Christian Burkert

Stimuli fading away en route to consciousness

26/09/2017

Whether or not we consciously perceive the stimuli projected onto our retina is decided in our brain. A recent study by the University of Bonn shows how some signals dissipate along the processing path to conscious perception. This process begins at rather late stages of signal processing.
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Image: Zebrafish β-cells labeled using the Beta-bow system; Copyright: Ninov lab

Rainbow colors reveal cell history: Uncovering β-cell heterogeneity

25/09/2017

Dr. Nikolay Ninov, group leader at the DFG research center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD), Cluster of Excellence at the TU Dresden, and Paul Langerhans Institute Dresden (PLID), and his group developed a system called "Beta-bow", which allows the history of β-cells to be traced by genetic bar-coding and multicolor imaging.
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Image: cross section through a healthy bone above cross section of a bone with osteoporosis ; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Roberto_Biasini

Researchers describe mechanism that underlies age-associated bone loss

25/09/2017

This knowledge can provide targets in the search for novel bone-loss therapeutics to treat osteoporosis.
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Image: X-ray image of a human chest, showing the lungs; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Guzel

Respiratory diseases, musculoskeletal conditions, depressive symptoms and diabetes

22/09/2017

Respiratory diseases are major causes of disease burden and mortality. They are also the focus of the latest issue of the Journal of Health Monitoring, which features a Focus article that considers acute respiratory diseases such as influenza as well as chronic lung diseases including lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma.
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Image: model of a human brain with luminous areas; Copyright: panthermedia.net/pixologic

Drugs in disguise heal the brain

22/09/2017

The treatment of brain diseases is on the verge of a breakthrough. Researchers from Aalborg University are developing a new method that 'smuggles' medicine past the brain's defense systems, giving hope that diseases such as Alzheimer's can one day be cured.
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Image: Illustration of the Leipzig spoon, which is pushed to the back of the eye; Copyright: University of Leipzig/M. Francke

The "Leipzig Spoon" to cure pathological myopia

22/09/2017

Many people all over the world suffer from myopia, also known as nearsightedness. A severe elongation of the eyeball is the cause behind it. If it continues to progress, it ultimately leads to complete loss of vision. Now an innovative medical device intends to stop this progression in the future.
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Image: documents and a stetoscope are lying on the table, the word

Differences in aggression among people with dementia

21/09/2017

Physical aggression among people with dementia is not unusual. A study from Lund University in Sweden showed that one-third of patients with the diagnosis Alzheimer's disease or frontotemporal dementia were physically aggressive towards healthcare staff, other patients, relatives, animals and complete strangers. This manifestation of disease must be both understood and addressed in the right way.
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Image: image of how Taxanes induce tripolar instead of normal bipolar cell division; Copyright: Munich University Hospital

Cancer drug stimulates tripolar mode of mitosis

21/09/2017

Taxanes inhibit cell division and make cancer cells sensitive to radiation therapy. A current study has investigated the underlying mechanisms of this action – and which biomarkers may be useful for predicting the success of therapy.
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Image: flu vaccination standing on the table; Copyright: Lancaster University

Why only half of healthcare workers have the flu vaccine

20/09/2017

The low uptake of flu vaccination among medical students and doctors is influenced by social attitudes say researchers. Despite a recommendation from the Chief Medical Officer for England that all healthcare workers are vaccinated annually, only 55 percent are protected against the spread of influenza, this could contribute to staff sickness and mortality among elderly patients.
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Image: illustration of the human immune system; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ralwel

Immune cells help fat deal with environmental challenges

20/09/2017

Immunosuppressive regulatory T-cells play an important role in the functioning of adipose tissue. This is the discovery of scientists from the Helmholtz Diabetes Center (HDC) at Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich (TUM). Their findings are published in the journal 'Cell Metabolism'.
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Image: viruses on black background; Copyright: panthermedia.net/frenta

A hair-trigger for cells fighting infection

19/09/2017

To fight infections cells in the immune system play a dangerous game with their own genes. Damaging genes allows B cells to make antibodies that are specifically equipped to target to specific causes of illness, but damaging genes also puts them at risk of becoming cancerous.
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Image: Comparison of normal vs hepatoblastoma liver tissue; Copyright: Etienne Meylan/EPFL

Metabolism can be used to subtype hepatoblastoma tumors

19/09/2017

Looking at cell metabolism instead of histology, EPFL scientists have identified new biomarkers that could help more accurately classify the two main subtypes of hepatoblastoma, a children liver cancer. Hepatoblastoma is a rare pediatric liver cancer, usually diagnosed in the first three years of life.
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Image: Breast cancer stem cell line 1 (BCSC1) from the newly established cell model; Copyright: Maurer Lab

Researchers found a possible new treatment for aggressive triple receptor-negative breast cancer

18/09/2017

Scientists from the cluster of excellence BIOSS Centre for Biological Signalling Studies at the University of Freiburg and the Freiburg University Medical Center have shown that inhibiting the epigenetic regulator KDM4 might offer a potential novel treatment option for breast cancer patients.
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Image: heaps of vegetables, one hand holding a blood glucose meter; Copyright: panthermedia.net/dml5050

Biomarkers in the blood prove strong role of food for type 2 diabetes

18/09/2017

A pioneering method, developed at Chalmers University of Technology, has demonstrated its potential in a large study, showing that metabolic fingerprints from blood samples could render important new knowledge on the connection between food and health. The study finds that diet is one of the strongest predictors of type 2 diabetes risk in older women.
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Image: Collage of several MRI images of the heart, in which different locations are marked with red arrows; Copyright: University Hospital Münster/Ali Yilmaz

Myocarditis: more specific diagnosis thanks to molecular imaging

01/09/2017

There are many causes of myocarditis or inflammation of the heart muscle. Oftentimes, the culprits are viruses or bacteria and sometimes even an acute heart attack. Regardless of the cause, it creates a challenge for cardiologists: a diagnosis tends to be only nonspecific without a biopsy. A cardiac MRI and molecular imaging promise to provide assistance.
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Image: interferometric detection of scattered light, iSCAT; Copyright: MPL

Interface between Physics and Medicine: new interdisciplinary center

22/08/2017

Physics has always supported medical science, especially when it comes to practical implementation. Now physicists and health professionals join in collaborative research at an interdisciplinary Center in Erlangen and incorporate fundamental principles of theoretical physics in their studies of diseases.
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Image: A man is working at a laboratory bench, his screen is showing a program that recognizes his gestures; Copyright: Fraunhofer IPA/Heike Quosdorf

Laboratory automation: from note book to gesture recognition

08/08/2017

For centuries, scientific research has succeeded by chronicling experiments with pinpoint accuracy. Yet despite all the progress in the actual laboratory, recording is often still done manually, in notebooks, logs or computer systems for instance. In the future, a gesture recognition system could perform this task for scientists.
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Image: woman holding a sketch of a human lung; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Monkeybusiness

Molecular Microsystems: Preventing Exacerbations of Asthma and COPD

01/08/2017

An increasing percentage of the world population suffers from chronic inflammatory disorders of the respiratory system. Acute attacks often lead to a worsening of the disease and considerably reduce the patient’s lung volume. Nine institutes of a research alliance under the Leibniz Institute umbrella are working on technologies designed to predict and thus prevent exacerbations.
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Image: blood is taken from a finger and analysed by a blood testing device; Copyright:hes_so_valais_wallis

Without any delay: drug dose adjustment at the point of care

01/08/2017

Many therapeutic drugs are very powerful, but they are also very toxic at the same time. Thus, they have to be measured regularly, again and again, so that an adjustment of the individual drug dosage can be made. Until now, the "normal" way was to take the blood sample, send it to a central laboratory and get the results after some days. A new point-of-care test can measure it in 15 minutes.
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Image: A young woman takes another young woman's blood sample; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Physician Assistant - profession with perspective

22/06/2017

The doctor's profession is exhausting and involves many different activities. For a long time, there have been discussions about how doctors can be supported by other specialists. One solution: help from so-called physician assistants.
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Image: In a movement laboratory, a man is wearing sensors on his legs and armst, while walking. During this he is being recorded and observed; Copyright: DAS BILD für ZHAW Gesundheit

"XoSoft" Project – Wearable Intelligent Exoskeleton

01/06/2017

After a stroke or as a result of aging, there are many situations when people are impaired in their walking ability and rely on a personal assistant or auxiliary aids and services. The XoSoft Project offers a solution: a soft exoskeleton that can be worn like a pair of leggings and stiffens or softens, depending on the situation.
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Image: A hand tips on a lying tablet; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Koson Rattanaphan

Project A.L.I.N.A: Training in the interdisciplinary emergency room

08/05/2017

How can emergency room associates continue to educate themselves in a fast manner and without bureaucratic hurdles? The A.L.I.N.A Project, which gives associates new tools with special assistance services and learning environments, delivers the solution. We spoke with Prof. Sabine Blaschke at the University Hospital Göttingen about these tools and how they work.
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Image: Young Indian woman in yellow sari talking on mobile phone; Copyright: panthermedia.net / iphemant

Medical Technology for India – Market of the Future?

02/05/2017

India is a land of contradictions. On the one hand, it has densely populated cities with state of the art technology. On the other hand, two-thirds of the population still live under challenging hygienic and financial conditions in the rural areas. Despite these conditions or perhaps because of them, more and more medical technology companies from all over the world are interested in this market.
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Image: Compass pointing towards the word creativity. In the compass’s center is a ball that shows the Indian flag; Copyright: panthermedia.net/eabff

Technology: India offers potential for research and development

02/05/2017

When it comes to the production and development of tech products, many people immediately think of Germany, Japan, the U.S. or Taiwan. What’s often unknown is that an emerging market like India also offers great potential. After all, the country has a large number of experts and just as much technical knowledge at its disposal.
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Image: Demonstrator; Copyright: Leibniz-IPHT

Medical imaging is onto septic fungi

03/04/2017

Instant treatment is absolute vital for patients developing sepsis. Providing a specific therapy early on is key. To manage this the pathogenic organisms need to be identified accurately. But a fungal sepsis can still be a hard nut to crack.
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Image: Graphic representation of Europe with small figures depicting the population; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Takahase Segundo

Hospital-acquired infections: pathogens know no borders

03/04/2017

Many aspects are uniformly regulated in Europe, however, hospital hygiene and MRSA prevention, for example, are not. The Netherlands plays a pioneering role in the fight against hospital-acquired infections. The country is an often-cited role model. But can other countries simply adopt the same system? And what makes it so different? MEDICA asked expert Prof. Alexander W. Friedrich.
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Image: A petri dish with yellow bacterial cultures on a black ground; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kwanchaichaiudom

Laboratory medicine: confronting infections with speed and foresight

03/04/2017

The laboratory is one of the most important and pivotal bastions in patient care. In the laboratory, acute, chronic and genetic diseases are diagnosed, the progression of diseases such as diabetes is regularly checked or specialists look for biomarkers to adapt cancer therapies.
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Image: Graphic of the generic architectur of the clinical data intelligence;  FAU Erlangen-Nürnberg Medizinische Fakultät

Medical Databases: One for All, All for One

01/03/2017

In the "KDI – Clinical Data Intelligence Project", researchers are trying to consolidate various types of data to make them useable and useful to both medical professionals and scientists. This is a tremendous undertaking, considering the data volumes from different sources. In this conversation with MEDICA, Dr. Martin Sedlmayr explains the project setup.
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Image: Different eye stents lying beside a coin; Copyright: I.Chen

Stents versus Eye Drops: a new approach to aid glaucoma patients

01/02/2017

Using stents to treat glaucoma is not a new procedure but they have not been implanted into patients on a regular basis until only recently. But this is about to change, which is why MEDICA.de asked what these glaucoma mini-stents are able to do and who may be a good candidate for them. Professor Norbert Pfeiffer answered our questions.
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Image: Image of a bird in greyscale and blurred; Copyright: Universitätsklinikum Tübingen

Gene therapy for the treatment of achromatopsia

01/02/2017

Achromatopsia is a rare hereditary visual disorder. Along with total color blindness, patients most notably suffer from reduced visual acuity and increased sensitivity to light and glare.
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Image: Three physicians during a meeting; Copyright: KiTZ/Philipp Benjamin

Children's Tumor Center: consolidated treatment under one roof

02/01/2017

Treatments for children need to be different from treatment for adults – this also applies in oncology. Having said that, children do not just need new and different treatment concepts that still necessitate research. They also require the support from their families, who need to be nearby during treatment.
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Image: Graphic of an ebola virus against a blue background; Copyright: panthermedia.net/krishna creations

Who am I? Viruses on Nanosprings

21/12/2016

Within the scope of the VIRUSCAN project that is funded by the Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Program of the European Union, Dr. Charlotte Uetrecht from Hamburg/Germany investigates individual viruses to be able to later identify them on a nanospring structure. MEDICA.de wanted to know: how does this work?
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Image: Zebrafish brain, fluorescence image (left) and 3D image (right); Copyright: private

"A 3D movie of the brain in action"

08/12/2016

Watching millions of neurons in the brain interacting with each other – for a long time this was possible only to a limited extent. The current techniques can visualize only superficial layers or the imaging they use is too slow. But now, Prof Daniel Razansky and his team have found a new method to visualize the brain activity – by using optoacoustics.
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Image: Eileen Stark prepares Dominik Wetzel for a measurement; Copyright: WHZ/Helge Gerischer

Paraplegia: moving muscles using electrical impulses

22/11/2016

It happens about 1,800 times per year: after a sporting or traffic-related accident, a person’s spinal cord is injured to where nerve tracts are severed and he/she becomes paralyzed. Researchers now want to develop software that measures the brain signals of paralyzed patients and sends out electrical impulses via a system to stimulate muscles, causing them to move again.
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Image: Hand of a person in the hospital bed, next to the call button; Copyright: panthermedia.net/bignai

Being safe: electronic call systems for hospitals

02/11/2016

Call systems: every hospital patient is familiar with them, but hardly anyone gives any thought to how they work. And yet they fulfill an important function because in an emergency, they "call" for help. Just think what might happen if they didn’t work. That is why they are subject to stringent safety regulations. We spoke with D.Eng. Matthias Rychetsky, who is familiar with call systems.
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Image: Graphic of a head within a computer network - many lines and bright colors; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andrew Ostrovsky

My Avatar and Me – the digitization of healthcare records

04/10/2016

So far, avatars could only be found in computer games. But if researchers of the EU-wide www.myhealthavatar.eu project have their way, this could soon change.
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Image: Dark haired, smiling woman in a hospital; Copyright: UKR

Inflammatory bowel diseases: More patient comfort and autonomy thanks to an app

04/10/2016

Chronic inflammatory bowel diseases like Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis increasingly develop at a younger age and affect patients for life. Regular check-ups need to occur every two to three months. Now, a specially designed app intends to provide relief.
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Image: Hybrid OR; Copyright: Philips GmbH

Hybrid Operating Room: The OR of the Future Today?

01/09/2016

Patients take center stage during surgery. Their treatment should be as gentle and effective as possible, which is why there is a trend towards minimally invasive surgery (MIS). But minimal procedures require better supporting technologies. The hybrid operating room combines surgery and imaging systems and increasingly replaces conventional open surgery approaches with MIS.
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Image: User interface of a software; Copyright: Helmholtz Zentrum München

Cell under observation: "The software lets us study the development on video"

08/08/2016

What happens when stem cells differentiate? What molecular characteristics do they have? Questions that can now be easier answered with the help of a new open-source software. We spoke with Prof. Fabian Theis at the Helmholtz Center Munich, who participated in the software development.
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Photo: Hospital  bed

Textiles used in hospitals and medical offices – germs don’t stand a chance

01/06/2016

Some hospitals have long banned the status symbol of physicians – the white coat. Research has shown that especially the sleeves were contaminated with various types of bacteria. But it’s not just lab coats that can spread germs in healthcare settings. This field uses a variety of different textiles. Wouldn’t it, therefore, make sense to apply antimicrobial finishes?
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Photo: Three men pose during an award ceremony

Cardiac insufficiency: early diagnosis with ultrasound

02/05/2016

Heart failure or cardiac insufficiency presents an extra strain on patients because it severally limits everyday performance and deprives them of energy. Due to their intense need for movement, children are particularly strongly affected. However, the disease is frequently not detected until the physical performance is already declining. An early diagnosis could prevent this.
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Photo: ceramic joints

Knee at your fingertips

22/04/2016

How can you print ceramics, what purpose do they have and how benefits medical technology? Answers provides Dr. Tassilo Moritz from Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems IKTS.
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Photo: Pregnancy test

Disaster medicine or disastrous medicine?

04/01/2016

Most Europeans think it was a long time ago, but the residents of West Africa clearly feel the consequences of the Ebola epidemic that broke out in December 2013 and still continues today. So far, approximately 11,300 people have died as a result of the outbreak; more than 28,000 contracted the disease.
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Photo: Magnet draws zigzag lines

Magnetogenetics: how neural stem cells grow in a certain direction

01/12/2015

If you could stimulate brain cells to grow in a specific direction, you would probably be able to achieve a significant improvement in the health of patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease. This is why the MAGNEURON project focuses on this approach. The EU is funding the project with approximately 3.5 million Euros.
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Photo: Surgeon uses command devices for a robot

Robotics: surgery with feeling

02/11/2015

Minimally invasive surgeries are gentler on the patient but have one distinct disadvantage for the surgeon: he is not able to interact directly with the operating field. Sometimes he misses impressions that are very important to the success of the intervention. The MiroSurge robot for surgical applications which transmits feedback to the surgeon can help.
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From the periodic table of elements into medicine: silicon for theranostics

01/10/2015

Semiconductor nanoparticles for biomedical applications have been researched for some time now. Not only are they millionths of a millimeter in size, they also offer great potential for cancer diagnostics and therapy, so-called theranostics. They enter cells, are activated by ultrasonic radiation and destroy the cells using the generated vibration.
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Theranostics: Complex particles for tomorrow's medicine

01/10/2015

It is a portmanteau, a mixture of two words. This way it saves us time and trouble while speaking because the human speech apparatus is lazy. And it describes a mixture of procedures: the combination of two procedures that would normally be separate in medicine. We are talking about theranostics.
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Small companions: How wearables change our lives

01/09/2015

They can be seen everywhere: at the wrists, in the ear, clipped to the belt. Wearables are small technical assistants who are built to collect and partially also to analyze data. Some of them collect measurable health data, others "only" count their user’s steps or measure the surrounding UV radiation. The fact is, however, that wearables are en vogue and are used for many different cases.
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Photo: huge data server

Big Data: breaking the curse of dimensionality

24/08/2015

The term big data is complex. On one hand, it describes the amount of data itself while characterizing the technology required to collect and analyze the data on the other. The fact is big data is essential in medicine. Data-supported models not only assist in promoting medical research, they also make it easier to reach treatment decisions.
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Radiopharmaceuticals: Individualized diagnostics and therapy

03/08/2015

Malignant tumors can be fought with X-rays – usually with radiation therapy from outside the body. Nuclear medicine physicians can also accomplish this inside the body with radioactive materials, called radiopharmaceuticals. They also offer big benefits for clinical diagnostics as long as a specific target can be assigned to them.
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Photo: People with covered faces

Data protection: Can medical research be anonymized?

08/07/2015

Electronic health records, telemedicine, cloud computing and big data: questions about data protection appear everywhere in digitized health care. Yet what do things look like far away from application at the foundations of medicine? Can patient data and personal rights in research be protected when several centers and numerous researchers participate in studies?
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ECG measurements: "Our chest strap moistens itself"

01/07/2015

When measuring myocardial activity, it is important for the skin to always stay moist under the electrodes of the ECG. Only then can data be consistently transferred. Athletes have an easier time with this: they are used to sweating. This is a lot harder for older patients.
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Photo: Mini organ chip

Mini synthetic organism: When the heart beats on a chip

08/06/2015

Replicating the human organism in a mini format – researchers at the Fraunhofer IWS braved this challenge. They developed a compact system where different physical processes can be imitated on a chip. It is also possible to copy cardiac and pulmonary functions.
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Tumor markers: State-of-the-art diagnostics for personalized medicine

01/06/2015

When cancer is diagnosed, the terms tumor markers or biomarkers keep popping up. They describe characteristics that are not found in healthy persons. The classic tumor markers can be easily detected in blood samples or other body fluids. Other analysis methods require more effort. Yet they all share one thing in common: biomarkers indicate a potential tumor.
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Cancer Immunotherapy: Individual mutations as new target structures

01/06/2015

A tumor is as unique as the person who is affected by it. For a long time, it was assumed this would make treatment more difficult since cancer drugs are not able to be one hundred percent effective in targeting the affected cells. In this interview with MEDICA.de, Professor Ugur Sahin explains why it is precisely these individual mutations that make him hopeful for a new type of therapy.
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Statutory Skin Cancer Screening: "This is not just about mortality rates"

04/05/2015

Since the end of April 2015, the long-awaited evaluation report on the skin cancer screening programs offered by German health insurance providers is now finally available. We spoke with Dr. Ralph von Kiedrowski, Board Member of the German Dermatologist Association (German: Berufsverband Deutscher Dermatologen) on what the screening can accomplish and his take on the G-BA report.
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Photo: Knee operation

Cartilage Registry: "We generate fully independent data"

23/03/2015

Does a patient benefit from treatment or not? How many patients are being treated as a result of damaged cartilage in the knee joint? What intervention is performed most frequently? These and other questions are meant to be answered in the future with the help of a new Cartilage Registry, which was created by the German Society for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery.
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Crisis Management: Keeping the big picture in mind

02/03/2015

How should a hospital best respond to an emergency and which types of crises should it be prepared for? We spoke with Professor Ronald Glasberg at the SRH Hochschule Berlin on this subject.
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Photo: Ensminger and Gummert holding a 3D heart replica

Aortic valve replacement: Precise preoperative surgical preparation thanks to a silicone heart

23/02/2015

An 80-year-old female patient needs a new aortic valve replacement. Since the old one is severally calcified, the leaflets no longer open properly. Due to various factors, the patient is considered inoperable. Nevertheless, to make surgery possible for her, specialists at the Heart and Diabetes Center NRW in Germany have prepared the intervention based on an exact 3D heart replica.
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Photo: Object slides

Tissue storage: "Our top biobanks are internationally leading the charge"

02/02/2015

Only projects with a solid foundation are successful in the long run. This is also true for science. Biobanks are the most important component of this foundation when it comes to fundamental biomedical research: Only high quality tissue samples that are stored there make conclusive research possible - for example in search of the causes of tumorigenesis.
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Photo: interaction between the proteins

IBD: When genetics and environment interact

05/01/2015

T-cells are the guardians of our immune system. When they show changes, it can lead to severe inflammatory responses in the body. It is believed that the T-cells in persons who are affected by inflammatory bowel disease don’t work properly. Two proteins that can be found on activated T-cells and that interact with each other are now being analyzed.
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Photo: device for standardized wounds

ARTcut: Standardized injury of skin models for wound healing research

08/12/2014

Comparative research models are indispensable in wound healing research to evaluate new treatments of chronic wounds. Consequently, studies need to exhibit equivalent basic prerequisites and be conducted on similar wounds. This is why a team of researchers is working on an automated process to place standardized wounds in skin models.
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Making Your Own End-of-Life Decisions: “All options of palliative care, pain management and continued life need to have been explained to the patient“

01/12/2014

How does a physician handle a patient, who wants to die and what rights do I actually have as a patient? Legal practitioners do not automatically answer these and other questions. We talked about this subject with MD-PhD Ralf Jox from the Institute of Ethics, History and Theory of Medicine at the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Germany.
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Grafic: A lot of different people as comic book characters

Population study: "We want to track the study participants over many years"

24/11/2014

How do diseases of civilization develop and can they be prevented when you know triggering factors? A new National Cohort should deliver answers in the coming years. The Leipzig Research Center for Civilization Diseases is involved in this study. We spoke with Dr. Kerstin Wirkner, who is going to co-supervise the study in Leipzig.
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Xenon magnetic resonance imaging: making pathological changes in the body visible

03/11/2014

As an imaging procedure, magnetic resonance tomography has become essential in clinical practice, since it can easily make organs and tissue visible. However, until now abnormal cancer cells or small centers of inflammation remained almost invisible. Now cell biologists from Berlin, Germany, have succeeded in fixing this problem with xenon magnetic resonance imaging.
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Wound treatment with fish skin

03/11/2014

The treatment of chronic wounds is extremely problematic. Chronic wounds can take months or years to heal and some even never heal resulting in over 100.000 amputations taking place annually in the US alone. A new technology from Iceland, that is based on fish skin and is already used clinically, allows for improved healing of chronic and burn wounds.
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Photo: Dr. Anna-Maria Liphardt

Laboratory in Space: Hot on the Trails of Cartilage Degradation

01/10/2014

On November 10, 2014, astronaut Alexander Gerst will return to Earth from the International Space Station (ISS). He is not just anxiously expected by his family, but also by Dr. Anna-Maria Liphardt from the Institute of Biomechanics and Orthopedics at the German Sport University Cologne
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Photo: Nanodiamond

Nanodiamonds: "Our goal is not to be able to diagnose a specific disease, but to offer medicine a universal tool"

22/09/2014

They are not just “a girl's best friend“, but are also important helpers in medicine: diamonds. Yet the latter are so tiny that they are not visible to the naked eye. Dr. Patrick Happel at the Ruhr University Bochum in Germany studies so-called nanodiamonds. Someday soon, they are supposed to help in significantly improving medical imaging.
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Persistent vegetative state: brain stimulation with laser beams

01/09/2014

The public only notices diseases when celebrities become patients: in the spring of 2014, Formula One driver Michael Schumacher fell into a coma for several months as the result of a head injury caused by a skiing accident. These types of accidents show how delicate the brain responds to injuries. Brain stimulation could possibly support the rehabilitation of vegetative patients.
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Pediatric anesthesia: "I would object to a specialty medical training"

01/09/2014

When very young children already need to be in the operating room, it’s not just the parents that are concerned. This type of situation is a special challenge for the entire operating team, because children are always very special patients - especially since they are not just simply small grown-ups!
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Photo: a hand holds a sign for magnesium

Absorbable magnesium scaffold: "The patches need to follow the movement of the cardiac muscle"

08/08/2014

A magnesium implant will soon be available to help patients, who exhibit damage in the high-pressure area of the heart. The implant protects a tissue matrix where new cells that replace the affected tissue are meant to grow. The implant itself is supposed to completely dissolve after several months. MEDICA.de spoke with D. Eng. Thomas Hassel about this exciting project.
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Diagnosing Parkinson's: the skin is revealing

01/07/2014

In patients with Parkinson's, neural cells in the brain die off that produce the neurotransmitter dopamine. Certain physical symptoms that can indicate the disease follow years later. But a reliable diagnosis can only be made through examination of the brain after the patient's death, and not during his lifetime.
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Fat is the best medicine: "Adipose tissue contains many multipotent stem cells, approximately 500 times more than bone marrow"

01/07/2014

The not so popular “love handles“ could revolutionize medicine in the near future. In cooperation with the University of Rostock (Professor Hermann Seitz), the human med AG Company currently seeks to develop a device that is able to gently remove adipose tissue during surgery and subsequently isolate stem cells.
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Photo: Middle-ages woman speaks at the phone

Study on chronically ill patients: "Coaching can save money"

10/06/2014

The German Technician Health Insurance (German: Techniker Krankenkasse) conducted a study on the Topic “Phone coaching helps seriously ill patients and saves money“. We spoke with Günter van Aalst about the interesting findings.
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Sports and cancer: no panacea, but a necessary aid

02/06/2014

When are sports healthy, how often should you engage in sports and what effect do sports have on the body – over the past few decades, there were always different answers to these questions. Many studies that were conducted in the past however confirm the assumption that sports and exercise always support health, even if someone is already sick.
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Mobile assistance systems: "The device automatically notifies if something is not right"

02/05/2014

Staying active and mobile when you are old – who doesn’t want that? People suffering from dementia can often only dream about that. The fear of not finding your way back home or not getting any help in an emergency severally restricts many affected people in the way they live their lives. Yet there are many people, who could still independently participate in life despite mild dementia.
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Graphic: Space station

"Studies involving microgravity suggest stem cells will grow faster in space"

22/04/2014

The International Space Station ISS is not only the largest artificial object in space. It is also a laboratory for physicists, chemists, biologists and physicians and orbits earth at 28.000 kilometers per hour at an altitude of 400 kilometers. Thanks to this location, the ISS could one day make an important contribution to regenerative medicine.
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Photo: Boss and employees

"Employees, who like to contribute their talents, stay healthy"

08/04/2014

Dr. Walter Kromm, Master of Public Health, is not just a general practitioner, but also a health advisor for management professionals. During his many years of practical experience, he kept realizing how important employee health is for the health of an entire company.
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"The secrets of an astronaut's health and fitness"

24/03/2014

He is kind of a "Bones" McCoy, since he keeps astronauts fit: Dr. Simon Evetts leads the Medical Projects and Technology team within the Medical Support Office of the European Astronauts Centre in Cologne, Germany. MEDICA.de talked to him about sports in universe, space technology and the benefits for us earthlings.
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Photo: Physician talks to a girl

"Pediatric conditions often require pediatric-specific engineering"

10/03/2014

Children are not just small adults and they cannot be treated as such. Physicians have recognized this but manufacturers of medical devices have a hard time here: the market for pediatric medical devices is very small and researchers have difficulties to turn their ideas into commercially successful products.
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Seminars for physicians: "Physicians are obligated to continue their education for the safety of their patients"

04/03/2014

Continuing education is an integral part of the medical profession, because research continuously delivers new findings that sooner or later make their way into patient treatments. How does an event need to be organized to provide the highest level of benefit for the participants? MEDICA.de spoke with Eva Ningel, Managing Director for beta seminare bonn berlin GmbH (bsbb).
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Photo: Researcher in the lab

"An MRI device the size of two to three shoeboxes could soon sit on your desk"

24/02/2014

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a well-established procedure in clinical diagnostics. It creates a signal with millions of nuclear spins, which in turn is converted into images. Very large magnets are being used to align the nuclear spins. Researchers at the University Medical Center Freiburg study a new method that can do without expensive magnets.
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"We don’t know why certain pharmaceuticals bind especially well while others bind barely at all"

10/02/2014

Prof. Joachim Heberle from the Free University of Berlin wants to make the smallest protein structures visible under the microscope. He wants to accomplish this with an infrared microscope, originating in the field of physics. He told MEDICA.de which technology is behind all this and what he also wants to examine with it in the future.
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Radiology and technology: "Numerous phantom studies have been conducted that prove the advantages of this new CT system"

03/02/2014

Radiologists usually do their work after oncologists when it comes to cancer treatment. Yet modern radiology also provides treatments at this point. MEDICA.de spoke with Professor Stefan Schönberg, Director of the Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine at the University Medical Center Mannheim, Germany, about the use of a new computer tomograph and its benefits for patients.
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"The immunosensory system goes beyond the actual immune cells"

22/01/2014

It guards the body but can become its enemy: the immune system defends us from intruding pathogens; it is also able to cause severe diseases if it falsely recognizes the body itself as a threat. Molecular receptors in the whole body enable the immune system to “sense” what happens within.
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Photo: Man and woman visit a physician

"Gender-specific adjustments in clinical diagnostics and therapy can be expected"

15/01/2014

In Western civilization, equality of women and men has been a topic for many years and is already being successfully implemented in many areas, even if many obstacles still need to be overcome – the introduction of quotas for women in boardrooms, just to mention one of them.
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"The Virus Manipulates the Host Cell on Different Levels"

08/01/2014

Heart diseases can be triggered by special viruses that affect the cardiac muscle. Preventive drugs could definitely be developed – if the virus does not mutate.
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Study approach: surgical trials mean more safety in the operating room

06/01/2014

Whether a surgical suture is better applied manually or with a surgical stapler can be determined through trial and error. Determining which method guarantees patient safety best should also not just be based on a surgeon’s experience. Controlled studies are the method of choice to assess both well-proven and new techniques in the operating room.
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Clinical trials: "Registry-embedded clinical trials are the way of the future"

06/01/2014

Even medical risk products are not always tested as thoroughly as would be necessary – be it because of criminal energy, lack of know-how or financial reasons. A revision of clinical trial procedures could not only fix loop holes and methodological flaws. Products and methods could also be brought into general medical care more quickly under new rules.
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