Image: Cells under a microscope; Copyright: Jia Xie, Lerner Lab

New approach makes cells resistant to HIV

12/04/2017

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found a way to tether HIV-fighting antibodies to immune cells, creating a cell population resistant to the virus. Their experiments under lab conditions show that these resistant cells can quickly replace diseased cells, potentially curing the disease in a person with HIV.
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Image: Graphic of a protein complex; Copyright: MIPT Press Office

One step closer to cracking the mystery of bacterial adaptation to antibiotics

11/04/2017

An international team of researchers has proposed an explanation of the way bacteria process external signals. By identifying the detailed structure of the protein complex used by bacteria, the scientists gained insights into the ability of these microorganisms to detect even small changes in the environment and adapt to them. The research findings were published in "Scientific Reports".
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Image: a cell structure in blue; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Ralwel

How to hack a cell

07/04/2017

The human body is made up of trillions of cells, microscopic computers that carry out complex behaviors according to the signals they receive from each other and their environment. Synthetic biologists engineer living cells to control how they behave by converting their genes into programmable circuits.
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Image: A graphic showing a correlation between errors in DNA and protein structure; Copyright: KIT

Big Data approach to predict protein structure

28/03/2017

Proteins are the molecular all-rounders in our cells. If they do not work properly, severe diseases, such as Alzheimer’s, may result. To develop methods to repair malfunctioning proteins, their structure has to be known. Using a big data approach, researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now developed a method to predict protein structures.
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Image: Computer-generated image of a DNA helix where a long molecule is attached; Copyright: Juan J. Nogueira, University of Vienna

How do metals interact with DNA?

27/03/2017

To fight cancer, every year thousands of chemical substances are screened for their potential effects on tumor cells. Once a compound able to inhibit cancer cell growth is found, it still takes several years of research until the drug gets approved and can be applied to patients.
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Image: Graphical rendering of antibodies attacking cancer cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Ugreen

New drug delivery method for cancer therapy

23/03/2017

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have developed a new drug delivery method that produces strong results in treating cancers in animal models, including some hard-to-treat solid and liquid tumors.
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Image: A wooden doll with a painted networks of dots and acupuncture needles on it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/fotohunter

Electroacupuncture releases stem cells

22/03/2017

A study led by Indiana University School of Medicine researchers demonstrates how electroacupuncture triggers a neurological mechanism that can help promote tissue repair and relieve injury-induced pain.
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Image: Structural models of two proteins; Copyright: Hiroshima University

"Smart" genetic library – making disease diagnosis much easier

15/03/2017

Researchers at Hiroshima University have developed a smart genetic reference library for locating and weeding out disease-causing mutations in populations.
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Image: Two men standing infront of a blackboard; Copyright: University of Michigan

Can math help explain our bodies - and our diseases?

06/03/2017

What makes a cluster of cells become a liver, or a muscle? How do our genes give rise to proteins, proteins to cells, and cells to tissues and organs? The incredible complexity of how these biological systems interact boggles the mind - and drives the work of biomedical scientists around the world.
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Image: Computer generated graphic of red blood cells inside a blood vessel; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Jelena Jovanovic

How blood can be rejuvenated

01/03/2017

Our blood stem cells generate around a thousand billion new blood cells every day. But the blood stem cells’ capacity to produce blood changes as we age. This leads to older people being more susceptible to anaemia, lowered immunity and a greater risk of developing certain kinds of blood cancer.
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Image: Different images of the brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/tushchakorn

Tiny fibers open new windows into the brain

01/03/2017

For the first time ever, a single flexible fiber no bigger than a human hair has successfully delivered a combination of optical, electrical, and chemical signals back and forth into the brain, putting into practice an idea first proposed two years ago.
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Image: Hands of a physician who is performing a urine test with a test strip; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Esben Hansen

Diabetic kidney disease is decoded

27/02/2017

Diabetes is a leading cause of kidney disease, a serious, often fatal complication that is difficult to diagnose in early, potentially treatable stages. Now, a research team at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has revealed biological pathways involved in diabetic kidney disease, providing hope that both early diagnostic tests and targeted treatment can be designed.
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Image: Red killer cells and green immunocytes; Copyright: AG Kastenmüller/Universität Bonn

Infection defense: call for support by the killer cells

15/02/2017

A few days after a viral infection, countless killer cells swarm out to track down and kill infected body cells. In this way, they are highly effective at preventing pathogens from being able to spread further. An international research team has now explained an important mechanism behind building this army. The work under the aegis of the University of Bonn is published in the journal Immunity.
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Image: Different kinds of nuts; Copyright: panthermedia.net/fotokris44

Hard shell - healthy kernel

10/02/2017

Roasted and salted, ground as a baking ingredient or fresh from the shell - for all those who enjoy eating nuts, there is good news from nutritionists at Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Germany). Their latest research shows that nuts can inhibit the growth of cancer cells.
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Image: Colored cells under the microscope; Copyright: Laboratoire Bourquin - UNIFR/UNIGE

Method for screening the most useful nanoparticles for medicine

10/02/2017

The use of nanoparticles - small, virus-sized elements developed under laboratory conditions - is increasingly widespread in the world of biomedicine. This rapidly-evolving technology offers hope for many medical applications, whether for diagnosis or therapies.
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Image: Colored image of cells in tissue; Copyright: Song et al./Cell Reports

Basement membrane protein influences connection of blood vessel cells

06/02/2017

Which molecular mechanisms are at work when, in the case of inflammation, immune cells migrate from the blood vessel into the tissue? Researchers at the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence at Münster University have gained new insights into this question. The study has been published in the journal Cell Reports.
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Image: elderly woman at a doctor's office; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Barbara Reddoch

Too much sitting, too little exercise may accelerate biological aging

23/01/2017

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that elderly women who sit for more than 10 hours a day with low physical activity have cells that are biologically older by eight years compared to women who are less sedentary.
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Image: Drawings of scar tissues and colored tissue samples in comparison; Copyright: Penn Medicine

Using fat to help wounds heal without scars

19/01/2017

Doctors have found a way to manipulate wounds to heal as regenerated skin rather than scar tissue. The method involves transforming the most common type of cells found in wounds into fat cells - something that was previously thought to be impossible in humans.
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