Image: Green OLED light during physical stimulation of cells (OLED and cell culture plate); Copyright: Fraunhofer FEP

Cell-compatible OLEDs for use with patients

29/08/2016

Cytocompatibility studies of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have been carried out on cell cultures for the first time at the Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP to test how well OLEDs are tolerated by cells.
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Image: Two pictures of a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease; Copyright: Salk Institute

Elevating brain protein allays symptoms of Alzheimer's

26/08/2016

Boosting levels of a specific protein in the brain alleviates hallmark features of Alzheimer's disease in a mouse model of the disorder, according to new research published online in "Scientific Reports".
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Image: Green insect cells under seen through a microsope; Copyright: Helmholtz Zentrum München

Progress in vaccination against vespid venom

25/08/2016

Especially in late summer, apprehension about wasp stings increases amongst allergy sufferers. So-called hyposensibilisation therapy can help, but it is linked to a heavy burden on patients and health insurers. Researchers at the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University Munich have now presented a method in the journal "Allergy", which facilitates a personalised procedure.
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Image: Fluorescence microscopy image of stem cells; Copyright: Aalto University

Nanofiber scaffolds show new behaviour of stem and cancer cells

24/08/2016

A discovery in the field of biomaterials may open new frontiers in stem and cancer cell manipulation and associated advanced therapy development. Novel scaffolds are shown enabling cells to behave in a different but controlled way in vitro due to the presence of aligned, self-assembled ceramic nanofibers of an ultra-high anisotropy ratio augmented into graphene shells.
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Image: Pictured is a fluorescently labeled endothelial cell monolayer, pseudocolorized in blue/green; Copyright: University of Pittsburgh

Gene therapy via ultrasound could offer new therapeutic tool

23/08/2016

Combining ultrasound energy and microbubbles to poke holes in cells may prove to be a new tool in the fight against cardiovascular disease and cancer, according to researchers from the University of Pittsburgh and UPMC. A study on this gene therapy approach, called sonoporation, is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
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Image: 3D-image of a person, in the esophagus is one part highlighted red; Copyright: Panthermdia.net/Eraxion

Bad or benign? Testing cells for esophageal cancer risk

22/08/2016

Genetically analysing lesions in the food pipe could provide an early and accurate test for oesophageal cancer, according to research led by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL), Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam and Arizona State University.
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Image: Computer generated image showing round orange cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net/knorre

Online marketing of stem cell therapy

09/08/2016

Advanced economy nations led by Ireland, Singapore, Australia, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the United States have the highest per capita number of clinics engaging in direct-to-consumer marketing of stem cell therapies, according to the world's largest-ever study of such clinics.
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Image: design of nanocarriers; Copyright: University of Pennsylvania

Penn researchers improve computer modeling for designing drug-delivery nanocarriers

05/08/2016

Researchers has developed a computer model that will aid in the design of nanocarriers, microscopic structures used to guide drugs to their targets in the body. The model better accounts for how the surfaces of different types of cells undulate due to thermal fluctuations, informing features of the nanocarriers that will help them stick to cells long enough to deliver their payloads.
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Image: Depiction of patch sensor via CFDRC; Copyright: Sergio Omar Garcia/CFDRC

Sustainable sensors to detect, predict muscle fatigue

02/08/2016

It may be clammy and inconvenient, but human sweat has at least one positive characteristic - it can give insight to what is happening inside your body.
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Image: Enlarged neurons. The cell bodies are purple, whereas the axons are green; Copyright: UAB

Discovery may lead to a treatment to slow Parkinson's disease

22/07/2016

Using a robust model for Parkinson's disease, University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers and colleagues have discovered an interaction in neurons that contributes to Parkinson's disease, and they have shown that drugs now under development may block the process.
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Image: A man and a woman sitting at a table, looking into the camera. There are papers and a monitor on the table; Copyright: Universitat Jaume I de Castellón

Researchers discover genetic causes of higher melanoma risk in men

22/07/2016

A study led by researchers at Universitat Jaume I de Castellón has identified one of the genetic causes underlying the higher rate of melanoma in men. The results have been published in Biology of Sex Differences.
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Image: Microscopy image of a culture mouse neuron; Copyright: Carlos Sánchez-Huertas

The machinery that neurons use to form and maintain their neuronal extensions

22/07/2016

The study, led by IRB Barcelona and published in Nature Communications will help research into regenerative medicine and potentially also help understand neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s.
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Image: An upper half body, which is blue and transparent. The muscles of the arm are higlighted in red; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Eraxion

Protein found to bolster growth of damaged muscle tissue

21/07/2016

Johns Hopkins University biologists have found that a protein that plays a key role in the lives of stem cells can bolster the growth of damaged muscle tissue, a step that could potentially contribute to treatments for muscle degeneration caused by old age and diseases such as muscular dystrophy.
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Image: Graphic of a neuron, that is connected with many other neurons via synapses. The synapses are glowing at several points; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ktsdesign

World Brain Day 2016 - The ageing brain

21/07/2016

The World Federation of Neurology (WFN) invites the people to observe the World Brain Day for the third time in 2016. This year’s motto is “The ageing brain”. The focus lies on prevention of and dealing with the neurological diseases stroke, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, since the risk to fall ill with them increases with age.
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Image: Three microfluidic devices made from transparent plastic; Copyright: SMART

Microfluidic device to study electric field cancer therapy

14/07/2016

Researchers at MIT's research center in Singapore have developed a new microfluidic device that tests the effects of electric fields on cancer cells. They observed that a range of low-intensity, middle-frequency electric fields effectively stopped breast and lung cancer cells from growing and spreading, while having no adverse effect on neighboring healthy cells.
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Photo: A coloured tissue section with makred cancer cells

Consensus in the fight against colorectal cancer

07/07/2016

In colorectal cancer, the presence of invasive tumor cells at the advancing edge of the tumor can provide valuable information on prognosis. Initiated by the Colorectal Cancer Research Group at the Institute of Pathology, University of Bern, a consensus conference was held to determine how this phenomenon should best be put into practice.
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Photo: A plug of pink 3-D bioprinted cartilage on top of a plug of osteocondral material

3-D printing produces cartilage from strands of bioink

28/06/2016

Strands of cow cartilage substitute for ink in a 3D bioprinting process that may one day create cartilage patches for worn out joints, according to a team of engineers.
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Photo: petri dish next to further samples

Software improves ability to catalog bacterial pathogens

28/06/2016

Washington State University researchers have developed a new software tool that will improve scientists' ability to identify and understand bacterial strains and accelerate vaccine development.
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Photo: syringe and stethoscope lay on a paper with the word

New approach to determining risk of cancer reoccurring

27/06/2016

What is the likelihood of a patient developing cancer again after having a tumor removed? This is the question that experts in medicine and medical informatics at Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) aim to find answers to in a new research project called ‘MelEVIR – Melanoma, Extracellular Vesicles and Immune Response’.
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Photo: syringe and stethoscope lay on a paper with the word

A better way to predict diabetes

24/06/2016

Researchers have discovered a simple, accurate new way to predict which women with gestational diabetes will develop type 2 diabetes after delivery. The discovery would allow health care providers to identify women at greatest risk and help motivate women to make early lifestyle changes and follow other strategies that could prevent them from developing the disease later in life.
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Graphic: printer prints a human head

A new bio-ink for 3-D printing with stem cells

24/06/2016

The new stem cell-containing bio ink allows 3D printing of living tissue, known as bio-printing. The new bio-ink contains two different polymer components: a natural polymer extracted from seaweed, and a sacrificial synthetic polymer used in the medical industry, and both had a role to play.
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Photo: blood cells under a microscope

Fighting resistant blood cancer cells

22/06/2016

Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) develops through chromosomal alterations in blood-forming cells of the bone marrow and usually occurs in older persons. Around 20 percent of adults diagnosed with leukemia suffer from this type of blood cancer.
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Photo: a woman smokes an e-cigarette

E-cigarette: hundreds of genes involved in airway immune defense

21/06/2016

When we smoke cigarettes, dozens of genes important for immune defense are altered in the epithelial cells that line the respiratory tract. Several of these changes likely increase the risk of bacterial infections, viruses, and inflammation. Now, electronic cigarettes alters those same genes and hundreds more that are important for immune defense in the upper airway.
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Photo: Phil Santangelo and Eric Alonas are shown with a spinning disk confocal microscope used to image cells

Tiny mirror improves microscope resolution for studying cells

17/06/2016

A tiny mirror could make a huge difference for scientists trying to understand what's happening in the micron-scale structures of living cells.
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Photo: T-cells under a microscope

Super-resolution microscopy reveals unprecedented detail of immune cells' surface

16/06/2016

hen the body is fighting an invading pathogen, white blood cells including T-cells must respond. Now, Salk Institute researchers have imaged how vital receptors on the surface of T cells bundle together when activated.
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Photo: cancer cells

Antibody-based drug helps 'bridge' leukemia patients to curative treatment

14/06/2016

In a randomized Phase III study of the drug inotuzumab ozogamicin, a statistically significant percentage of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) whose disease had relapsed following standard therapies, qualified for stem cell transplants.
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Photo: blood sample

Blood test could help monitor treatment response

13/06/2016

Scientists at the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), the Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research and the University of Tübingen have identified proteins in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid that reflect nerve cell damage.
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Photo: A tissue sample coloured in red and green

New way of growing blood vessels for regenerative medicine

02/06/2016

Growing tissues and organs in the lab for transplantation into patients could become easier after scientists discovered an effective way to produce three-dimensional networks of blood vessels, vital for tissue survival yet a current stumbling block in regenerative medicine.
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Photo: A device with handles and multiple cables

Multiphoton microscope and endoscope to speed up diagnosis

01/06/2016

Two new optical devices could reduce the need to take tissue samples during medical examinations and operations and to then send them for testing – potentially speeding up diagnosis and treatment and cutting healthcare costs.
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