Image: Enlarged illustration of a cancer cell (in green) and T-cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net/royaltystockphoto

Dying tumour cells release intracellular ions

16/09/2016

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute in the USA and the Babraham Institute, UK, have discovered how a mineral ion leaked from tumour tissue as it dies acts to stop the work of anti-tumour immune cells. This discovery provides a new approach in the development of treatments to engage the immune system in the fight against cancer.
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Image: Three scientists standing in a row; Copyright: RUB, Kramer

Poison in the brain

16/09/2016

The following factors facilitate the formation of putatively toxic structures in the neuronal nuclei of Alzheimer's patients. Spherical structures in the nucleus of nerve cells, so-called nuclear spheres, are suspected to trigger Alzheimer's disease.
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Image: A word cloud. In the centre is written

Belgian scientists discover missing link in septic shock

15/09/2016

Researchers at VIB and Ghent University have discovered an important mechanism of sepsis, an overreaction of the body’s immune system to an infection. In this condition, the brain is unable to curb an inflammatory response, causing organ failure or ‘septic shock’.
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Image: Five researchers in a laboratory; Copyright: Thor Balkhed

Predicting the severity of multiple sclerosis

15/09/2016

Cells in the immune system of patients with multiple sclerosis behave differently from those of healthy individuals. Researchers at Linköping University in Sweden have exploited this difference to develop a method that can predict disease activity in multiple sclerosis.
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Image: Black background with some red and blue lights; Copyright: A*STAR’s Genome Institute of Singapore

Scientists develop DNA-altering technology to tackle diseases

14/09/2016

Researchers in Singapore have developed a new protein that can alter DNA in living cells with much higher precision than current methods.
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Image:  Phylogenetic tree for cancer evolution; Copyright: Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania

Penn software helps to identify course of cancer metastasis

12/09/2016

Individual cells within a tumor are not all the same. This may sound like a modern medical truism, but it wasn't very long ago that oncologists assumed that taking a single biopsy from a patient's tumor would be an accurate reflection of the physiological and genetic make-up of the entire mass.
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Image: Image shows cancer cell; Copyright: Panthermedia.net/Sebastian Kaulitzki

Study shows how Chinese medicine kills cancer cells

09/09/2016

Researchers at the University of Adelaide have shown how a complex mix of plant compounds derived from ancient clinical practice in China – a Traditional Chinese Medicine – works to kill cancer cells.
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Image: Image shows blue marked ephrins and red marked ephs forming yellow marked complexes at cell contact points; Copyright: MPI of Neurobiology/Gaitanos

Hungry cells on the move

08/09/2016

Researchers discover a signalling pathway that enables cells to reach their destinations through repulsion.
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Image: Immunohistochemical staining of nasal polyp tissue; Copyright: Helmholtz Zentrum München

Response to house dust mites is age-dependent

31/08/2016

In adults with a house dust mite allergy, a cascade of inflammatory signals on the surface of the airways leads to airway remodeling. This process cannot be influenced by standard cortisone therapy. Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich have reported these findings.
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Image: Green OLED light during physical stimulation of cells (OLED and cell culture plate); Copyright: Fraunhofer FEP

Cell-compatible OLEDs for use with patients

29/08/2016

Cytocompatibility studies of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have been carried out on cell cultures for the first time at the Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP to test how well OLEDs are tolerated by cells.
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Image: Two pictures of a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease; Copyright: Salk Institute

Elevating brain protein allays symptoms of Alzheimer's

26/08/2016

Boosting levels of a specific protein in the brain alleviates hallmark features of Alzheimer's disease in a mouse model of the disorder, according to new research published online in "Scientific Reports".
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Image: Green insect cells under seen through a microsope; Copyright: Helmholtz Zentrum München

Progress in vaccination against vespid venom

25/08/2016

Especially in late summer, apprehension about wasp stings increases amongst allergy sufferers. So-called hyposensibilisation therapy can help, but it is linked to a heavy burden on patients and health insurers. Researchers at the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University Munich have now presented a method in the journal "Allergy", which facilitates a personalised procedure.
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Image: Fluorescence microscopy image of stem cells; Copyright: Aalto University

Nanofiber scaffolds show new behaviour of stem and cancer cells

24/08/2016

A discovery in the field of biomaterials may open new frontiers in stem and cancer cell manipulation and associated advanced therapy development. Novel scaffolds are shown enabling cells to behave in a different but controlled way in vitro due to the presence of aligned, self-assembled ceramic nanofibers of an ultra-high anisotropy ratio augmented into graphene shells.
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Image: Pictured is a fluorescently labeled endothelial cell monolayer, pseudocolorized in blue/green; Copyright: University of Pittsburgh

Gene therapy via ultrasound could offer new therapeutic tool

23/08/2016

Combining ultrasound energy and microbubbles to poke holes in cells may prove to be a new tool in the fight against cardiovascular disease and cancer, according to researchers from the University of Pittsburgh and UPMC. A study on this gene therapy approach, called sonoporation, is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
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Image: 3D-image of a person, in the esophagus is one part highlighted red; Copyright: Panthermdia.net/Eraxion

Bad or benign? Testing cells for esophageal cancer risk

22/08/2016

Genetically analysing lesions in the food pipe could provide an early and accurate test for oesophageal cancer, according to research led by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL), Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam and Arizona State University.
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Image: Computer generated image showing round orange cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net/knorre

Online marketing of stem cell therapy

09/08/2016

Advanced economy nations led by Ireland, Singapore, Australia, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the United States have the highest per capita number of clinics engaging in direct-to-consumer marketing of stem cell therapies, according to the world's largest-ever study of such clinics.
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Image: design of nanocarriers; Copyright: University of Pennsylvania

Penn researchers improve computer modeling for designing drug-delivery nanocarriers

05/08/2016

Researchers has developed a computer model that will aid in the design of nanocarriers, microscopic structures used to guide drugs to their targets in the body. The model better accounts for how the surfaces of different types of cells undulate due to thermal fluctuations, informing features of the nanocarriers that will help them stick to cells long enough to deliver their payloads.
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Image: Depiction of patch sensor via CFDRC; Copyright: Sergio Omar Garcia/CFDRC

Sustainable sensors to detect, predict muscle fatigue

02/08/2016

It may be clammy and inconvenient, but human sweat has at least one positive characteristic - it can give insight to what is happening inside your body.
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Image: Enlarged neurons. The cell bodies are purple, whereas the axons are green; Copyright: UAB

Discovery may lead to a treatment to slow Parkinson's disease

22/07/2016

Using a robust model for Parkinson's disease, University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers and colleagues have discovered an interaction in neurons that contributes to Parkinson's disease, and they have shown that drugs now under development may block the process.
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Image: A man and a woman sitting at a table, looking into the camera. There are papers and a monitor on the table; Copyright: Universitat Jaume I de Castellón

Researchers discover genetic causes of higher melanoma risk in men

22/07/2016

A study led by researchers at Universitat Jaume I de Castellón has identified one of the genetic causes underlying the higher rate of melanoma in men. The results have been published in Biology of Sex Differences.
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Image: Microscopy image of a culture mouse neuron; Copyright: Carlos Sánchez-Huertas

The machinery that neurons use to form and maintain their neuronal extensions

22/07/2016

The study, led by IRB Barcelona and published in Nature Communications will help research into regenerative medicine and potentially also help understand neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s.
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Image: An upper half body, which is blue and transparent. The muscles of the arm are higlighted in red; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Eraxion

Protein found to bolster growth of damaged muscle tissue

21/07/2016

Johns Hopkins University biologists have found that a protein that plays a key role in the lives of stem cells can bolster the growth of damaged muscle tissue, a step that could potentially contribute to treatments for muscle degeneration caused by old age and diseases such as muscular dystrophy.
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Image: Graphic of a neuron, that is connected with many other neurons via synapses. The synapses are glowing at several points; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ktsdesign

World Brain Day 2016 - The ageing brain

21/07/2016

The World Federation of Neurology (WFN) invites the people to observe the World Brain Day for the third time in 2016. This year’s motto is “The ageing brain”. The focus lies on prevention of and dealing with the neurological diseases stroke, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, since the risk to fall ill with them increases with age.
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Image: Three microfluidic devices made from transparent plastic; Copyright: SMART

Microfluidic device to study electric field cancer therapy

14/07/2016

Researchers at MIT's research center in Singapore have developed a new microfluidic device that tests the effects of electric fields on cancer cells. They observed that a range of low-intensity, middle-frequency electric fields effectively stopped breast and lung cancer cells from growing and spreading, while having no adverse effect on neighboring healthy cells.
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Photo: A coloured tissue section with makred cancer cells

Consensus in the fight against colorectal cancer

07/07/2016

In colorectal cancer, the presence of invasive tumor cells at the advancing edge of the tumor can provide valuable information on prognosis. Initiated by the Colorectal Cancer Research Group at the Institute of Pathology, University of Bern, a consensus conference was held to determine how this phenomenon should best be put into practice.
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