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Causative gene for sensorineural hearing loss identified


A causative gene for a highly common type of hearing loss (sensorineural hearing loss, or SNHL) has been identified by a group of Japanese researchers, who successfully replicated the condition using a transgenic mouse. This discovery could potentially be used to develop new treatments for hearing loss. The findings were published in the online version of EMBO Molecular Medicine.
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Children with skull deformity: Measurement can help


A baby's skull is made of several plates of bone that fuse together over time to form a single structure. Previous research has shown that approximately one in 2,000 babies have plates that fuse too early - a condition called craniosynostosis - causing cranial deformities that can lead to learning impairments and other neurodevelopmental problems.
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Children: antibiotic exposure associated with food allergy risk


Antibiotic treatment within a child's first year of life may wipe out more than an unwanted infection: exposure to the drugs is associated with an increase in food allergy diagnosis, new research from the University of South Carolina suggests.
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Using a urine sample to diagnose respiratory pathologies of preterm newborns


Experts from the V. I. Kulakov Research Center for Obstetrics, Gynecology and Perinatology and the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) have devised a method that uses the urinary proteome to diagnose conditions in newborn babies.
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Protein in breast milk reduces infection risk in premature infants


Researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine have found that a manufactured form of lactoferrin, a naturally occurring protein in breast milk, can help protect premature infants from a type of staph infection.
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Image: Zika Map; Copyright: University of Southampton

Study suggests 1.6 million childbearing women could be at risk of Zika virus infection


Research by scientists in the US and UK has estimated that up to 1.65 million childbearing women in Central and South America could become infected by the Zika virus by the end of the first wave of the epidemic.
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