Image: 3D-image of a person, in the esophagus is one part highlighted red; Copyright: Panthermdia.net/Eraxion

Bad or benign? Testing cells for esophageal cancer risk

22/08/2016

Genetically analysing lesions in the food pipe could provide an early and accurate test for oesophageal cancer, according to research led by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL), Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam and Arizona State University.
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Photo: Red skeletal myotubes seen through a microscope

Researchers use gelatin to grow stronger muscles

05/07/2016

USC researcher Megan L. McCain and colleagues have devised a way to develop bigger, stronger muscle fibers. But instead of popping up on the bicep of a bodybuilder, these muscles grow on a tiny scaffold or "chip" molded from a type of water-logged gel made from gelatin.
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Photo: a coin lays on a micro chip

Scientific gains may make electronic nose the next everyday device

20/06/2016

Researchers at the Texas Analog Center of Excellence (TxACE) at UT Dallas are working to develop an affordable electronic nose that can be used in breath analysis for a wide range of health diagnosis.
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Photo: man holds his hands in front of his chest

Potential key to preventing heart attacks, strokes in older adults

16/06/2016

As men and women grow older, their chances for coronary heart disease also increase. Atherosclerosis is a condition in which plaque builds up inside the arteries, which can lead to serious problems, including heart attacks, strokes or even death.
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Photo: vascular bypass

The vascular bypass revolution

15/06/2016

Coronary or peripheral bypasses are the most frequently performed vascular operations. Although one million patients per year and around the world, undergo this intervention, its failure rate reaches 5 percent, because of poor vessel healing, leading to vessel graft occlusion.
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Photo: Laser Ablation

Laser ablation becomes increasingly viable treatment for prostate cancer

13/06/2016

Prostate cancer patients may soon have a new option to treat their disease: laser heat. UCLA researchers have found that focal laser ablation - the precise application of heat via laser to a tumor - is both feasible and safe in men with intermediate risk prostate cancer.
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