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Computational method identifies existing drugs with virus-fighting potential


A new, computer-based screening method could reveal the virus-fighting potential of drugs originally developed to treat other conditions, reports a study in PLOS Computational Biology.
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Protein in mosquito spit can keep Dengue virus in check


Mosquito saliva influences transmission of viruses to a bitten mammalian host. For example, it contains factors that dampen the host immune response and so facilitate infection. A study published in PLOS NTDs reports on a saliva protein with the opposite effect.
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New strategy identified for treating acute myeloid leukemia


A multi-institutional academic and industry research team led by investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the Harvard Stem Cell Institute has identified a promising new approach to the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML).
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Potentially harmful chemicals widespread in household dust


First-of-a-kind study reveals top 10 consumer product chemicals in dust with known or suspected health impacts.
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Protein could open door to new class of antibiotics


Researchers have made the first-ever detailed, atomic-level images of a peroxiredoxin, which has revealed a peculiar characteristic of this protein and might form the foundation for a new approach to antibiotics.
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A data-cleaning tool for building better prediction models


Big data sets are full of dirty data, and these outliers, typos and missing values can produce distorted models that lead to wrong conclusions and bad decisions, be it in healthcare or finance. With so much at stake, data cleaning should be easier.
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Critical protein shows promise for the treatment of Alzheimer's


The tidal wave approaches. In the coming decades, Alzheimer's disease is projected to exact a devastating economic and emotional toll on society, with patient numbers in the US alone expected to reach 13.5 million by mid-century at a projected cost of over a trillion dollars.
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Artificial intelligence expedites breast cancer risk prediction


Researchers at Houston Methodist have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) software that reliably interprets mammograms, assisting doctors with a quick and accurate prediction of breast cancer risk.
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People with type O blood more likely to die of cholera


People with blood type O often get more severely ill from cholera than people of other blood types. New research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis may explain why.
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3-D-printed structures "remember" their shapes


Engineers from MIT and Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) are using light to print three-dimensional structures that "remember" their original shapes.
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Lack of pharmacy access sends some patients back to the hospital


Hospital readmissions, a 17-billion-dollar annual problem, are higher in rural, remote or smaller communities that sometimes have significantly less access to pharmacies, according to a study published today that was one of the first to examine this issue.
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To beat hypertension, take the 'clinic' to the people


Eliminating racial disparities in the outcomes of programs to control blood pressure can be accomplished with a few one-on-one coaching sessions delivered by health professionals - but not if the program requires people to get to a clinic, according to results of a new Johns Hopkins Medicine study.
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New microfluidic chip replicates muscle-nerve connection


MIT engineers have developed a microfluidic device that replicates the neuromuscular junction - the vital connection where nerve meets muscle. The device, about the size of a U.S. quarter, contains a single muscle strip and a small set of motor neurons. Researchers can influence and observe the interactions between the two, within a realistic, three-dimensional matrix.
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Promising peer mentoring program for early career gero-nursing faculty


New models for providing mentorship to early career academics will become key to developing and maintaining an experienced faculty.
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Randomized penumbra 3-D trial of next generation stent retriever meets primary endpoints


The Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery's (SNIS) 13th Annual Meeting announced that the Penumbra 3D Trial successfully met the primary trial endpoints, demonstrating non-inferiority in safety and efficacy of Penumbra 3D Revascularization Device, when used with Penumbra System aspiration devices compared to Penumbra System aspiration devices alone.
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Americans worried about using gene editing, brain chip implants and synthetic blood


Many in the general public think scientific and technological innovations bring helpful change to society, but they are more concerned than excited when it comes to the potential use of emerging technologies to make people's minds sharper, their bodies stronger and healthier than ever before, according to a new Pew Research Center survey.
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