Photo: syringe and stethoscope lay on a paper with the word

A better way to predict diabetes

24/06/2016

Researchers have discovered a simple, accurate new way to predict which women with gestational diabetes will develop type 2 diabetes after delivery. The discovery would allow health care providers to identify women at greatest risk and help motivate women to make early lifestyle changes and follow other strategies that could prevent them from developing the disease later in life.
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Photo: blood sugar monitoring device

High blood sugar could mean lower risk of one type of brain tumor

21/06/2016

In a surprising twist, benign brain tumors that have previously been tied to obesity and diabetes are less likely to emerge in those with high blood sugar, new research has found.
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Photo: Left to right, green fluorescence shows damaged area shrinking over time. Top row, eyes from normal mice. Other rows are eyes from three different mouse models of diabetes

Electric fields weaker in slow-healing diabetic wounds

17/06/2016

People with diabetes often suffer from wounds that are slow to heal and can lead to ulcers, gangrene and amputation. New research from an international group led by Min Zhao, professor of ophthalmology and of dermatology at the University of California, Davis, shows that, in animal models of diabetes, slow healing is associated with weaker electrical currents in wounds.
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Potential key to preventing heart attacks, strokes in older adults

16/06/2016

As men and women grow older, their chances for coronary heart disease also increase. Atherosclerosis is a condition in which plaque builds up inside the arteries, which can lead to serious problems, including heart attacks, strokes or even death.
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Photo: Doctor measures blood sugar of a child

Infections can increase diabetes risk in children

11/05/2016

Viral respiratory infections during the first six months of life are associated with an increased risk for type 1 diabetes. This is the conclusion reached by a team of scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München during a study published in the current issue of JAMA.
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Photo: Fiber optic biosensor-integrated microfluidic chip

Fiber optic biosensor-integrated microfluidic chip to detect glucose levels

02/05/2016

Insulin deficiency and hyperglycemia are two well-known culprits behind diabetes, both of which are reflected in blood glucose concentrations. Now, researchers are working to create ultrasensitive lab-on-a-chip devices to quickly measure glucose concentrations with the goal of developing device for early diagnosis and prevent of diabetes.
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