Image: Graphic of the microneedles that deliver insulin; Copyright: American Chemical Society

Toward a 'smart' patch that automatically delivers insulin when needed

23/01/2017

Treatment for certain diabetes cases involves constant monitoring of blood-glucose levels and daily insulin shots. But scientists are now developing a painless "smart" patch that monitors blood glucose and releases insulin when levels climb too high.
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Image: Diagram of a cell; Copyright: ETH Zurich

New weapon against Diabetes

23/12/2016

ETH Researchers have used the simplest approach yet to produce artificial beta cells from human kidney cells. Like their natural model, the artificial cells act as both sugar sensors and insulin producers.
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Photo: Man and woman at the doctor; Copyright: panthermedia.net/londondeposit

Hispanic adults with diabetes could benefit from peer support interventions

15/12/2016

Diabetes is a global health problem that disproportionally affects individuals of ethnic and racial minorities. Minorities are more likely to experience complications from the disease, and the death rate from diabetes among Hispanics is 50 percent higher than non-Hispanic whites, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health.
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Photo: Researchers in a laboratory; Copyright: Marit Mitchell / U of T Engineering

Skin cells 'crawl' together to heal wounds treated with unique hydrogel layer

15/12/2016

Time may not heal all wounds, but a proprietary mix of peptides and gel developed by U of T Engineering researchers heals most. A team led by Professor Milica Radisic has demonstrated for the first time that their peptide-hydrogel biomaterial prompts skin cells to "crawl" toward one another, closing chronic, non-healing wounds often associated with diabetes, such as bed sores and foot ulcers.
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Image: Alpha cell; Copyright: Cell Press

Breakthrough in diabetes research: Cells produce insulin instead upon artemisinin treatment

14/12/2016

FDA-approved artemisinins, since decades used to treat malaria, transform glucagon-producing alpha cells in the pancreas into insulin producing cells – thereby acquiring features of beta cells, the cell type damaged in type 1 diabetes.
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Image: A red heart behind a wall made of sugar cubes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Moise Marius Dorin

Heart damage caused by chemotherapy is worse in diabetics

13/12/2016

Heart damage caused by chemotherapy is worse in cancer patients who also have diabetes, according to a study. "Cardiotoxicity induced by chemotherapy with anthracyclines is being increasingly reported, mainly because a smaller proportion of patients now die from cancer," said lead author Dr Ana Catarina Gomes, a cardiologist in training at the Hospital Garcia de Orta in Almada, Portugal.
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Image: Nuts in a bowl with a spoon; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Jiri Hera

A handful of nuts a day cuts the risk of a wide range of diseases

05/12/2016

A large analysis of current research shows that people who eat at least 20g of nuts a day have a lower risk of heart disease, cancer and other diseases.
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Image: Researcher is holding a star shaped object in his hand; Copyright: Melanie Gonick/MIT

New capsule achieves long-term drug delivery

25/11/2016

Researchers at MIT and Brigham and Women's Hospital have developed a new drug capsule that remains in the stomach for up to two weeks after being swallowed, gradually releasing its drug payload.
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Image: Female researcher from Europe sitting between African women; Copyright: Institute of Tropical Medicine Antwerp

mHealth interventions: no silver bullet for diabetes patients

23/11/2016

Globally about 442 million people live with diabetes, most of them in low-income countries, where health systems often function poorly. As they are not equipped to follow-up on patients or improve the quality of care, chronic disease management largely falls under the responsibility of the patients.
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Photo: chart from Peptidpeaks; Copyright: Helmholtz Zentrum München

Proteins as an early warning system for type 1 diabetes?

18/11/2016

Certain proteins in the blood of children can predict incipient type 1 diabetes, even before the first symptoms appear. A team of scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München, partners in the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), reported these findings in the ‘Diabetologia’ journal.
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Image: Sleeping woman; Copyright: panthermedia.net / pressmaster

Study links shorter sleep and sugar-sweetened drink consumption

10/11/2016

People who sleep five or fewer hours a night are likely to also drink significantly more sugary caffeinated drinks, such as sodas and energy drinks, according to a new study of more than 18,000 adults led by UC San Francisco scientists.
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Photo: 3D structures made of TPU for insoles; Copyright: Fraunhofer IWM

3D printing: customized insoles for diabetes patients

09/11/2016

In the past, insoles for patients with diabetes were hand-made by orthopedic shoemakers. In the future, these specialist shoemakers will be able to produce insoles more cost-effectively thanks to new software and the use of 3D printers. This approach means the mechanical properties of each insole can be assessed scientifically and more effectively.
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Image: fat tissue with light red stained adipocytes; Copyright: Delphine Duteil

When fat cells change their colour

01/11/2016

The epigenetic enzyme Lsd1 plays an important role in maintaining brown fat tissue.
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Image: Computer generated image of a head with an implant in the neck that is hit by ultrasound waves; Copyright: Fraunhofer IBMT

Basic structure of ultrasound power supply and communication

27/10/2016

Unlike drugs, active implants such as electroceuticals act locally, have fewer side effects and function directly through electrical signals, much like the body itself. Fraunhofer researchers presenting a new technology platform that can power active implants wirelessly via ultrasound. The experts are targeting widespread diseases such as high blood pressure, diabetes and Parkinson's.
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