Image: A doctor is holding some pills in his hand and offering it to the viewer; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Lev Dolgachov

Doctors prescribe more antibiotics when expectations are high

17/02/2017

Experimental evidence confirms what surveys have long suggested: Physicians are more likely to prescribe antibiotics when they believe there is a high expectation of it from their patients, even if they think the probability of bacterial infection is low and antibiotics would not be effective, according to a study published by the American Psychological Association.
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Image: A smiling doctor is talking to a patient; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia Ltd.

Supporting a caring culture for hospital patients and staff through 'Being Human'

16/02/2017

Going into hospital, whether unexpectedly or planned, can be a very difficult time for patients and their families. Care and support from hospital staff can make a huge difference to their experiences, but when staff face increasing demands on their time, this is not always easy to deliver.
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Data mining tools for personalized cancer treatment

14/02/2017

In the laboratories of Institute of Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), drug testing is done ex vivo. That is, various leukemia drugs are tested with patient samples instead of the patients themselves. This enables the researchers to test different drug combinations efficiently and without burdening the patient.
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Image: Dermatologist is examining psoriasis at a patient's elbow; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Hriana

Treatment has no sufficient effect in 1 of 5 psoriasis patients

09/02/2017

A substantial part of people, one in five, undergoing systemic treatment for psoriasis till have considerable problems with their disease. This is according to a study with 2,646 Swedish psoriasis patients conducted at Umeå University and the Swedish Institute for Health Economics, and recently published in the Journal of Dermatological Treatment.
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Image: A female physician is talking to a girl in the waiting area; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia Premium

Startup commercializes software to improve pediatric care

08/02/2017

The promise of information technology has been to improve quality, cut costs and increase patient satisfaction. By themselves, electronic health records, or EHRs, have failed to achieve those aims. Software that adds functionality to EHRs can assess patient risks, help physicians identify problems earlier and better document care quality.
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Image: A team of young people is standing together in a circle, putting their hands together; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Kzenon

Yes, we can! Yes, I can! – World Cancer Day, 02/04/2017

31/01/2017

At MEDICA-tradefair.com, we have already commemorated World Cancer Day quite often. But why? Because cancer is an omnipresent topic. Most certainly, sooner or later, directly or indirectly, each and every one of us will get in touch with it – when we develop cancer ourselves or a person close to us does.
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Image: Graphic of the microneedles that deliver insulin; Copyright: American Chemical Society

Toward a 'smart' patch that automatically delivers insulin when needed

23/01/2017

Treatment for certain diabetes cases involves constant monitoring of blood-glucose levels and daily insulin shots. But scientists are now developing a painless "smart" patch that monitors blood glucose and releases insulin when levels climb too high.
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Image: Physician is dressing the wound of a patient; Copyright: panthermedia.net/nawin nachiangmai

Post-Op complications measurements differ

19/01/2017

How do medical professionals determine whether or not a patient has experienced a post-operative complication? A team of Mayo Clinic physicians and researchers has published results of a three-year study examining mechanisms for measuring and reporting postoperative infection complications.
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Image: Man inside a CT; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Tyler Olson

Personalized treatment for those in blood pressure 'gray zone'

18/01/2017

Using data from a national study, Johns Hopkins researchers determined that using heart CT scans can help personalize treatment in patients whose blood pressure falls in the gray zone of just above normal or mild high blood pressure. Previously, the appropriate blood pressure treatment for these patients used risk calculations and some guesswork.
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Photo: Old man with two children and a tablet; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Barabasa

Tablet devices show promise in managing agitation among patients with dementia

09/01/2017

A new pilot study led by McLean Hospital's Ipsit Vahia, MD, medical director of Geriatric Psychiatry Outpatient Services at McLean Hospital, suggests that the use of tablet computers is both a safe and a potentially effective approach to managing agitation among patients with dementia.
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Image: Man sitting at a gambling table, with a drink in his hand, looking sad; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia ltd

Gambling addiction triggers the same brain areas as drug and alcohol cravings

04/01/2017

Gambling addiction activates the same brain pathways as drug and alcohol cravings, suggests new research. The study, by international scientists including researchers from Imperial College London, suggests targeting these brain pathways may lead to future treatments for the condition.
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Preventing mortality after myocardial infarction

04/01/2017

The University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) has been awarded a grant of 2 million dollar from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to pilot the Canadian component of a study to determine the optimal amount of blood to transfuse in anemic patients who have suffered a myocardial infarction.
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Researchers identify key proteins that may make Zika so deadly

03/01/2017

Until it burst onto the scene earlier this year, Zika was an obscure, little-known virus. As a result, scientists know little about how it works. Over the past year, they have learned that it can cause a range of dangerous health problems, including birth defects such as microcephaly and neurological problems such as Guillain-Barré syndrome.
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Image: Bacteria in a culture dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Anna Puhan

Using 'fire to fight fire' to combat disease could make it worse

03/01/2017

A treatment billed as a potential breakthrough in the fight against disease, including cancer, could back-fire and make the disease fitter and more damaging, new research has found. Ground-breaking research has found that introducing 'friendlier' less-potent strains into a population of disease-causing microbes can lead to increased disease severity.
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Spicy molecule inhibits growth of breast cancer cells

22/12/2016

Capsaicin, an active ingredient of pungent substances such as chilli or pepper, inhibits the growth of breast cancer cells. This was reported by a team headed by the Bochum-based scent researcher Prof. Hanns Hatt and Dr Lea Weber, following experiments in cultivated tumour cells.
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Breakthrough in diabetes research: Cells produce insulin instead upon artemisinin treatment

14/12/2016

FDA-approved artemisinins, since decades used to treat malaria, transform glucagon-producing alpha cells in the pancreas into insulin producing cells – thereby acquiring features of beta cells, the cell type damaged in type 1 diabetes.
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Heart damage caused by chemotherapy is worse in diabetics

13/12/2016

Heart damage caused by chemotherapy is worse in cancer patients who also have diabetes, according to a study. "Cardiotoxicity induced by chemotherapy with anthracyclines is being increasingly reported, mainly because a smaller proportion of patients now die from cancer," said lead author Dr Ana Catarina Gomes, a cardiologist in training at the Hospital Garcia de Orta in Almada, Portugal.
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Follow-up by trained nurses helps myocardial infarction patients

12/12/2016

The quality of life of elderly myocardial infarction patients can be significantly improved without extra costs by means of so-called case management following hospitalization. Health economists from the Helmholtz Zentrum München have reported these results in the journal Value in Health.
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Targeted preventive measures for hip fracture for persons with Alzheimer's disease

08/12/2016

The hip fracture risk factors are generally similar among those with and without Alzheimer's disease, according to a recent study from the University of Eastern Finland. However, the incidence of hip fracture is higher among those with Alzheimer's disease, regardless of other characteristics.
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Image: Abstract picurtre of DNA. A part of the DNA can be seen in a smartphone; Copyright: panthermedia.net/brijit vijayan

Collaborating on big data to unravel disease processes

07/12/2016

Patients with the same illness often receive the same treatment, even if the cause of the illness is different for each person. This represents a new step towards ultimately being able to offer every patient more personalised treatment.
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New ways to measure solid stress in tumors could lead to improved understanding, therapies

30/11/2016

Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators have developed new methods for mapping and measuring solid stress - the force exerted by solid and elastic components - within tumors, an accomplishment that may lead to improved understanding of those forces and their consequences and to novel treatment strategies.
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Image: An old man is walking on a tiny street, seen from behind; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Corinna Fuckas

Vestibular function declines starting at age 40

29/11/2016

A new study led by researchers at Massachusetts Eye and Ear found that vestibular thresholds begin to double every 10 years above the age of 40, representing a decline in our ability to receive sensory information about motion, balance and spatial orientation. The report was published in "Frontiers in Neurology".
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Image: Graphic of a green ball with purple logs attached to it; Copyright: Victor Kostyuchenko, Duke-NUS Medical School

First steps to neutralizing Zika

28/11/2016

As Zika spreads throughout the world, the call for rapid development of therapeutics to treat Zika rings loud and clear. Taking a step further in identifying a possible therapeutic candidate, a team of researchers have discovered the mechanism by which C10, a human antibody previously identified to react with the Dengue virus, prevents Zika infection at a cellular level.
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Image: A silhouette of a human head. In the head is a brain shown. A speech bubble points to the open mouth; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Benoit Charton

Stuttering related to brain circuits that control speech production

28/11/2016

Researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) have conducted the first study of its kind, using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to look at brain regions in both adults and children who stutter.
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