Photo: Old man with two children and a tablet; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Barabasa

Tablet devices show promise in managing agitation among patients with dementia

09/01/2017

A new pilot study led by McLean Hospital's Ipsit Vahia, MD, medical director of Geriatric Psychiatry Outpatient Services at McLean Hospital, suggests that the use of tablet computers is both a safe and a potentially effective approach to managing agitation among patients with dementia.
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Gambling addiction triggers the same brain areas as drug and alcohol cravings

04/01/2017

Gambling addiction activates the same brain pathways as drug and alcohol cravings, suggests new research. The study, by international scientists including researchers from Imperial College London, suggests targeting these brain pathways may lead to future treatments for the condition.
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Preventing mortality after myocardial infarction

04/01/2017

The University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) has been awarded a grant of 2 million dollar from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to pilot the Canadian component of a study to determine the optimal amount of blood to transfuse in anemic patients who have suffered a myocardial infarction.
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Researchers identify key proteins that may make Zika so deadly

03/01/2017

Until it burst onto the scene earlier this year, Zika was an obscure, little-known virus. As a result, scientists know little about how it works. Over the past year, they have learned that it can cause a range of dangerous health problems, including birth defects such as microcephaly and neurological problems such as Guillain-Barré syndrome.
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Using 'fire to fight fire' to combat disease could make it worse

03/01/2017

A treatment billed as a potential breakthrough in the fight against disease, including cancer, could back-fire and make the disease fitter and more damaging, new research has found. Ground-breaking research has found that introducing 'friendlier' less-potent strains into a population of disease-causing microbes can lead to increased disease severity.
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Spicy molecule inhibits growth of breast cancer cells

22/12/2016

Capsaicin, an active ingredient of pungent substances such as chilli or pepper, inhibits the growth of breast cancer cells. This was reported by a team headed by the Bochum-based scent researcher Prof. Hanns Hatt and Dr Lea Weber, following experiments in cultivated tumour cells.
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Breakthrough in diabetes research: Cells produce insulin instead upon artemisinin treatment

14/12/2016

FDA-approved artemisinins, since decades used to treat malaria, transform glucagon-producing alpha cells in the pancreas into insulin producing cells – thereby acquiring features of beta cells, the cell type damaged in type 1 diabetes.
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Heart damage caused by chemotherapy is worse in diabetics

13/12/2016

Heart damage caused by chemotherapy is worse in cancer patients who also have diabetes, according to a study. "Cardiotoxicity induced by chemotherapy with anthracyclines is being increasingly reported, mainly because a smaller proportion of patients now die from cancer," said lead author Dr Ana Catarina Gomes, a cardiologist in training at the Hospital Garcia de Orta in Almada, Portugal.
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Follow-up by trained nurses helps myocardial infarction patients

12/12/2016

The quality of life of elderly myocardial infarction patients can be significantly improved without extra costs by means of so-called case management following hospitalization. Health economists from the Helmholtz Zentrum München have reported these results in the journal Value in Health.
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Targeted preventive measures for hip fracture for persons with Alzheimer's disease

08/12/2016

The hip fracture risk factors are generally similar among those with and without Alzheimer's disease, according to a recent study from the University of Eastern Finland. However, the incidence of hip fracture is higher among those with Alzheimer's disease, regardless of other characteristics.
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Image: Abstract picurtre of DNA. A part of the DNA can be seen in a smartphone; Copyright: panthermedia.net/brijit vijayan

Collaborating on big data to unravel disease processes

07/12/2016

Patients with the same illness often receive the same treatment, even if the cause of the illness is different for each person. This represents a new step towards ultimately being able to offer every patient more personalised treatment.
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New ways to measure solid stress in tumors could lead to improved understanding, therapies

30/11/2016

Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators have developed new methods for mapping and measuring solid stress - the force exerted by solid and elastic components - within tumors, an accomplishment that may lead to improved understanding of those forces and their consequences and to novel treatment strategies.
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Vestibular function declines starting at age 40

29/11/2016

A new study led by researchers at Massachusetts Eye and Ear found that vestibular thresholds begin to double every 10 years above the age of 40, representing a decline in our ability to receive sensory information about motion, balance and spatial orientation. The report was published in "Frontiers in Neurology".
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Image: Graphic of a green ball with purple logs attached to it; Copyright: Victor Kostyuchenko, Duke-NUS Medical School

First steps to neutralizing Zika

28/11/2016

As Zika spreads throughout the world, the call for rapid development of therapeutics to treat Zika rings loud and clear. Taking a step further in identifying a possible therapeutic candidate, a team of researchers have discovered the mechanism by which C10, a human antibody previously identified to react with the Dengue virus, prevents Zika infection at a cellular level.
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Stuttering related to brain circuits that control speech production

28/11/2016

Researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) have conducted the first study of its kind, using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to look at brain regions in both adults and children who stutter.
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Understanding cancer worries could break down barriers to seeking help

25/11/2016

Recognizing the reasons people worry about a potential cancer diagnosis could help ease concern and encourage people with possible cancer symptoms to see their doctor earlier.
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Scientists develop tissue-engineered model of human lung and trachea

16/11/2016

Scientists at Children's Hospital Los Angeles have developed a tissue-engineered model of lung and trachea which contains the diverse cell types present in the human respiratory tract. The study was published this week in the online version of the journal "Tissue Engineering".
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Study links shorter sleep and sugar-sweetened drink consumption

10/11/2016

People who sleep five or fewer hours a night are likely to also drink significantly more sugary caffeinated drinks, such as sodas and energy drinks, according to a new study of more than 18,000 adults led by UC San Francisco scientists.
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Immune cell insight offers hope for tackling deadly lung condition

04/11/2016

Fresh insights into a life-threatening lung condition triggered by blood poisoning could signal a new approach to treating the disease, researchers found. Scientists have found that a drug, which targets key immune cells, could help to curb excessive inflammation in the lungs that is linked to the condition.
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Image: Scheme of the medical usage of the specific surface antigen GFRA2; Copyright: Osaka University

Discovery of molecular marker specific to early embryonic heart development

03/11/2016

Researchers centered at Osaka University identify molecule specifically expressed on one of the first cell populations to emerge as a precursor of the heart in embryos, which enables the cells to be isolated and studied, and potentially transplanted as a treatment for heart failure.
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New model to study inflammatory bowel disease in human biopsy samples

03/11/2016

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a complex condition that requires a lifetime of care and increases a person's cancer risk. But its origins are still a mystery. Now, a team of researchers have created a new culture model of the human intestine where living tissue from a patient biopsy can be preserved and studied for days.
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Ovarian transplantation might be possible in future

02/11/2016

Approximately 11 percent of women worldwide suffer from premature ovarian failure. This can have many different causes: chemotherapy administered for a malignant disease might irreversibly damage the ovaries and, because of the advances in modern cancer therapy, the number of young women surviving cancer is on the increase. The women, some of whom are still very young, prematurely enter menopause.
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Grant for nerve tumour research

31/10/2016

Research investigating how DNA from a virus millions of years old may affect the development of nerve tumours, has been awarded funding.
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Tiny gold particles could be the key to developing a treatment for pancreatic cancer

20/10/2016

A diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is often a death sentence because chemotherapy and radiation have little impact on the disease. In the U.S. this year, some 53,000 new cases will be diagnosed, and 42,000 patients will die of the disease. But research now being reported in ACS Nano could eventually lead to a new type of treatment based on gold nanoparticles.
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