Image: Medicationbox; Copyright: Panthermedia.net/duskbabe

International Patient Safety Day - 09/17/2016

16/09/2016

This year’s International Patient Safety Day takes place under the motto "Medication Safety". It is supposed to raise awareness of medication errors. Members of the health care systems will be able to present new approaches and exchange ideas with each other at events on this day.
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Image: A laughing and happy looking woman; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SIphotography

Keep intimate life intact despite tumour surgery in the pelvis

14/09/2016

Tumour surgery in the pelvis (urogenital and anal area) can lead to injuries of the regional nervous centre and therefore to bowel and bladder incontinence and sexual function disorders. This can dramatically influence the quality of life of those affected.
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Image: A doctor talking to an elderly patient; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Monkeybusiness

Voices of patients and oncologists must be heard, study says

13/09/2016

Specifically training oncologists and their patients to have high-quality discussions improves communication, but troubling gaps still exist between the two groups, according to a new study in "JAMA Oncology".
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Image: Image shows a woman feeling low; Copyright: Panthermedia.net/kmiragaya

Trauma patient deaths peak at two weeks

05/09/2016

A new study by University of Leicester academics has shown that lower severity trauma patients could be more likely to die after two to three weeks.
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Image: Hybrid OR; Copyright: Philips GmbH

Hybrid Operating Room: The OR of the Future Today?

01/09/2016

Patients take center stage during surgery. Their treatment should be as gentle and effective as possible, which is why there is a trend towards minimally invasive surgery (MIS). But minimal procedures require better supporting technologies. The hybrid operating room combines surgery and imaging systems and increasingly replaces conventional open surgery approaches with MIS.
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Image: a smiling dark haired man - Salvatore Oddo; Copyright: MIchelle Saldana, Biodesign Institute

Critical protein shows promise for the treatment of Alzheimer's

31/08/2016

The tidal wave approaches. In the coming decades, Alzheimer's disease is projected to exact a devastating economic and emotional toll on society, with patient numbers in the US alone expected to reach 13.5 million by mid-century at a projected cost of over a trillion dollars.
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Image: Mammogram, Malignant Tumor; Copyright: Houston Methodist

Artificial intelligence expedites breast cancer risk prediction

30/08/2016

Researchers at Houston Methodist have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) software that reliably interprets mammograms, assisting doctors with a quick and accurate prediction of breast cancer risk.
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Image: blood samples in test tubes; Copyright: USMC/Wikimedia Commons

People with type O blood more likely to die of cholera

30/08/2016

People with blood type O often get more severely ill from cholera than people of other blood types. New research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis may explain why.
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Image: Green OLED light during physical stimulation of cells (OLED and cell culture plate); Copyright: Fraunhofer FEP

Cell-compatible OLEDs for use with patients

29/08/2016

Cytocompatibility studies of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have been carried out on cell cultures for the first time at the Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP to test how well OLEDs are tolerated by cells.
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Image: Green insect cells under seen through a microsope; Copyright: Helmholtz Zentrum München

Progress in vaccination against vespid venom

25/08/2016

Especially in late summer, apprehension about wasp stings increases amongst allergy sufferers. So-called hyposensibilisation therapy can help, but it is linked to a heavy burden on patients and health insurers. Researchers at the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University Munich have now presented a method in the journal "Allergy", which facilitates a personalised procedure.
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Image: girl in the MRI, physican besides; Copyright: Klinikum Dortmund/Dr. Lindel

MRI scan: Video projections help children overcome their fear

22/08/2016

A beautiful field of flowers, a trip to the beach or a visit to the zoo. Children can experience all of these at the Clinical Center Dortmund in a 270- degree projection on the wall. The Center created a space that is designed to help its little patients overcome their fear of MRI scans.
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Image: newsletter practice changes in kidney stone treatment; Copyright: UBA News

New guidelines in kidney stone treatment

15/08/2016

A new guideline for the surgical management of patients with kidney and/or ureteral stones has been released by the American Urologic Association.
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Image: Young asian women is coughing in the street; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Leung Cho Pan

Rapid bacterial infection test reduces antibiotic use

11/08/2016

Researchers from the Oxford University Clinical Research Unit in Vietnam have shown that using a rapid (5-minute) test can reduce antibiotic misuse for respiratory infections. Cutting the number of unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions is a key way to prevent the spread of antibiotic-resistant infections.
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Image: A pharmacist is talking to an elderly customer; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmeda

Lack of pharmacy access sends some patients back to the hospital

10/08/2016

Hospital readmissions, a 17-billion-dollar annual problem, are higher in rural, remote or smaller communities that sometimes have significantly less access to pharmacies, according to a study published today that was one of the first to examine this issue.
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Image: Woman pointing on a virtual EMR; Copyright:  panthermedia.net / pandpstock001

Allaying fears

29/07/2016

As waves of hospitals move from older methods of record keeping to new digital electronic health record (EHR) systems, many medical professionals express fears that implementing an EHR system in their hospital will have dire results, including more errors and higher patient mortality.
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Image: Graphic of footwear; Copyright:  Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT

Avoiding stumbles, from spacewalks to sidewalks

29/07/2016

Vibrating footwear could help astronauts and visually impaired earthlings skirt obstacles.
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Image: Zika Map; Copyright: University of Southampton

Study suggests 1.6 million childbearing women could be at risk of Zika virus infection

26/07/2016

Research by scientists in the US and UK has estimated that up to 1.65 million childbearing women in Central and South America could become infected by the Zika virus by the end of the first wave of the epidemic.
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Image: Foot with thick bandages; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Alice Day

Australian first study finds massive diabetic foot disease costs

25/07/2016

New research from QUT shows preventable hospitalisation from diabetic foot disease is costing Australia hundreds of millions of dollars each year.
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Image: A computer circuit board; Copyright: UC3M

Guidance System with 3D sounds for the visually impaired

25/07/2016

The visually impaired will be able to use a new system of sensorial guidance that uses 3D sounds. The system was developed by Geko NAVSAT, a company that receives assistance from the Business Incubator at the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) Science Park.
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Image: Enlarged neurons. The cell bodies are purple, whereas the axons are green; Copyright: UAB

Discovery may lead to a treatment to slow Parkinson's disease

22/07/2016

Using a robust model for Parkinson's disease, University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers and colleagues have discovered an interaction in neurons that contributes to Parkinson's disease, and they have shown that drugs now under development may block the process.
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Image: A man and a woman sitting at a table, looking into the camera. There are papers and a monitor on the table; Copyright: Universitat Jaume I de Castellón

Researchers discover genetic causes of higher melanoma risk in men

22/07/2016

A study led by researchers at Universitat Jaume I de Castellón has identified one of the genetic causes underlying the higher rate of melanoma in men. The results have been published in Biology of Sex Differences.
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Image: Microscopy image of a culture mouse neuron; Copyright: Carlos Sánchez-Huertas

The machinery that neurons use to form and maintain their neuronal extensions

22/07/2016

The study, led by IRB Barcelona and published in Nature Communications will help research into regenerative medicine and potentially also help understand neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s.
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Image: An upper half body, which is blue and transparent. The muscles of the arm are higlighted in red; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Eraxion

Protein found to bolster growth of damaged muscle tissue

21/07/2016

Johns Hopkins University biologists have found that a protein that plays a key role in the lives of stem cells can bolster the growth of damaged muscle tissue, a step that could potentially contribute to treatments for muscle degeneration caused by old age and diseases such as muscular dystrophy.
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Image: The four researchers in a lab (three standing, one sitting); Copyright: Rolf Müller/UKB-UKom

Fighting life-threatening bacteria without antibiotics

20/07/2016

Each year, about 170,000 people die of complications of hepatic cirrhosis in Europe. Frequent causes of the widespread disease include alcohol abuse, fatty liver hepatitis, and chronic viral hepatitis. Liver cirrhosis develops gradually over a period of years and decades.
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Image: The word

Prize for research into speeding up stroke diagnosis

20/07/2016

A mathematician at the University of Strathclyde has shared in a prestigious prize for research into methods for accelerating the diagnosis of strokes.
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Image: A graphic that shows the new invention; Copyright: Nano Lab, Tufts University

A thread that collects diagnostic data when sutured into tissue

19/07/2016

For the first time, researchers led by Tufts University engineers have integrated nano-scale sensors, electronics and microfluidics into threads - ranging from simple cotton to sophisticated synthetics - that can be sutured through multiple layers of tissue to gather diagnostic data wirelessly in real time, according to a paper published in Microsystems & Nanoengineering.
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Image: Four blood bags, filled with blood, on white ground; Copyright: panthermedia.net/vladem

New blood management guidelines

19/07/2016

Improving the processes of ordering, transporting, and storing blood can save millions of dollars and drastically reduce blood wastage, reported a research team from one academic medical center after implementing institutional initiatives to address blood management.
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Image: UBC researcher Keekyoung Kim and UBC student Zongjie Wang working in a lab ; Copyright: UBC Okanagan

Cell research could help with heart tissue transplants

18/07/2016

A new technique developed by a UBC researcher could make tissue regeneration cheaper and safer for health-care systems and their patients.
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Image: Hand holds a transparent pill organizer; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Artem Chereshniuk

Pill organizers could cause adverse effects among elderly

14/07/2016

Older people who switch to using pill organizers could experience adverse effects and even hospitalization - according to research from the University of East Anglia.
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Image: Nurse is dressing the injured arm of a man; Copyright: panthermedia.net/georgerudy

Conceptual model for acute, unscheduled care

11/07/2016

Researchers at the George Washington University (GW) created a conceptual model for episodes of acute, unscheduled care - care that can be delivered in a variety of settings from emergency departments to doctors' offices, from urgent care centers to telemedicine.
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Photo: Two people with recumbent bikes during a race; Copyright: ETH Zürich/Alessandro Della Bella

Cybathlon: A new type of competition for people with disabilities

01/07/2016

Technical means that lend superpowers to humans are quite normal in comics and movies. In reality, their purpose is much more mundane: They are supposed to help people with disabilities in everyday life. MEDICA MEDICINE + SPORTS CONFERENCE, that takes place at MEDICA in November, is dealing with this topic, too.
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Photo: Diagnostic test in a laboratory

Experts call for standard list of essential diagnostic tests

01/07/2016

Similar to long-established list of essential medicines, a standard list of essential diagnostic test could help improve capacity and quality of testing in developing nations.
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Photo: Children play soccer in a park

Hard work pays off: even sick people benefit from physical activity

01/07/2016

Children instinctively know this – exercising is fun, makes you happy and keeps you fit. This begs the question of when and why this innate love for movement dwindles in many of us as we get older. After all, diseases like type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure can be considerably controlled with sufficient exercise.
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Photo: ; Copyright: Wearable Technologies

MEDICA MEDICINE + SPORTS CONFERENCE 2016

01/07/2016

More than 30 companies will again show the latest healthcare wearables. The 4th MEDICA MEDICINE + SPORTS CONFERENCE has established as the hot spot for innovations in sports medicine.
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Photo: physicians at station

Gram-negative bacteria pose a major challenge for hospitals

01/06/2016

Every day, people are admitted to the hospital, discharged or they visit patients. This large number of people increases the risk of bacteria transmission. Preventative measures such as short-sleeved uniforms and copper surfaces can help by improving hospital hygiene but they cannot replace the legal requirements for hygiene measures.
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Photo: Hospital  bed

Textiles used in hospitals and medical offices – germs don’t stand a chance

01/06/2016

Some hospitals have long banned the status symbol of physicians – the white coat. Research has shown that especially the sleeves were contaminated with various types of bacteria. But it’s not just lab coats that can spread germs in healthcare settings. This field uses a variety of different textiles. Wouldn’t it, therefore, make sense to apply antimicrobial finishes?
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Photo: ceramic joints

Knee at your fingertips

22/04/2016

How can you print ceramics, what purpose do they have and how benefits medical technology? Answers provides Dr. Tassilo Moritz from Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems IKTS.
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Photo: two physicians working at a test set-up

Atherosclerosis: Getting to the root of the problem with a turbo gene

09/02/2016

Many people suffer from atherosclerosis, especially in developed countries. The buildup of fatty deposits inside the arterial blood vessels leads to strokes and heart attacks. Now, a new method is designed to get to the root of the problem, and with the help of nanoparticles inject new turbo replacement cells into the blood vessels which are intended to exert their curative effect.
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Photo: artificial heart valve

Artificial heart valve: "The structure is meant to be broken down again by the body at a later point."

08/01/2016

There are various artificial heart valves available for children, but they have one essential drawback: they need to be replaced because the children are still growing. The artificial valve, on the other hand, remains the same size – and subsequently becomes too small. This is why an artificial heart valve that grows over time would be ideal.
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Photo: Pregnancy test

Disaster medicine or disastrous medicine?

04/01/2016

Most Europeans think it was a long time ago, but the residents of West Africa clearly feel the consequences of the Ebola epidemic that broke out in December 2013 and still continues today. So far, approximately 11,300 people have died as a result of the outbreak; more than 28,000 contracted the disease.
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Photo: white implant lying in petri dish

Repairing the bile duct with bacterial nanocellulose

08/12/2015

The closure apparatus between the gallbladder and small intestine is frequently injured during gallbladder surgeries. So far, however, there has been no surgical option to bridge tissue defects. Now, a novel implant made of bacterial nanocellulose (BNC) could change this. Its nanofiber network makes it extremely robust so that it is able to take on a supporting function.
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Photo: Young man and older woman use a tablet together; Copyright: panthermedia.net/szefei

Telehealthcare: networking brings relief

04/12/2015

Nowadays, everyone has access to his stored data and is able to work with them on different devices – thanks to the cloud. By now, online data storage plays a role in medicine as well: patient data can be collected digitally and centrally, authorized personnel can access it to make the fastest and best patient care possible.
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Photo: Magnet draws zigzag lines

Magnetogenetics: how neural stem cells grow in a certain direction

01/12/2015

If you could stimulate brain cells to grow in a specific direction, you would probably be able to achieve a significant improvement in the health of patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease. This is why the MAGNEURON project focuses on this approach. The EU is funding the project with approximately 3.5 million Euros.
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Image: Esophageal Cancer

Esophageal cancer: increased patient safety thanks to the ”Da Vinci“ surgical system

09/11/2015

Interview with Professor Jürgen Weitz, Director of the Clinic and Polyclinic of Visceral, Thoracic, and Vascular Surgery, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus at the Technical University Dresden
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Photo: Smiling man - Sven Seifert

A new world: hybrid operating room workstation

02/11/2015

Performing surgery in a hybrid operating room is meant to be a relief for the staff and offer patients new options for treatment. What is actually so different about this hybrid operating room, what can you expect and what should you keep in mind during the planning process?
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Photo: laboratory staff evaluating DNA

Direct-To-Consumer Testing: the business with lifestyle tests

08/10/2015

The many possibilities the Internet offers also don’t shy away from laboratory medicine. The demand for biochemical or genetic tests continues to rise. Next to standard laboratory tests, a market developed in which the patient is the immediate recipient of clinical results. New distribution channels eliminate the physician as the responsible party.
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Fighting myomas with ultrasound

01/10/2015

A proper diagnosis is a part of great therapy. However, it can also be beneficial to be able to quickly respond to changes during a treatment. One example of this is the treatment of uterine myomas. Female patients at the University Hospital Bonn are treated using so-called high-intensity focused ultrasound, HIFU in short. Prof. Holger Strunk explains this procedure.
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Theranostics: Complex particles for tomorrow's medicine

01/10/2015

It is a portmanteau, a mixture of two words. This way it saves us time and trouble while speaking because the human speech apparatus is lazy. And it describes a mixture of procedures: the combination of two procedures that would normally be separate in medicine. We are talking about theranostics.
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Photo: Running doctor

Industrial therapists in hospitals: changing structures

22/09/2015

Hospitals only achieve a high level of patient safety if the workplaces of all their employees are optimally designed. Things can become life-threatening when doctors and nursing staff have not been properly trained. Dr. Carsten Ostendorp at the Center for Industrial and Organizational Psychology in Hospitals (ZAK), spoke about this topic with MEDICA.de.
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A wearable to draw a complete picture of the heart

01/09/2015

Smartphone apps and wearable sensors have the potential to help people make healthier lifestyle choices. Self-monitoring therefore is one of the core strategies for changing cardiovascular health behaviors. On the other side, patients benefit from sharing their data with doctors and electronic health record (EHR) systems.
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Small companions: How wearables change our lives

01/09/2015

They can be seen everywhere: at the wrists, in the ear, clipped to the belt. Wearables are small technical assistants who are built to collect and partially also to analyze data. Some of them collect measurable health data, others "only" count their user’s steps or measure the surrounding UV radiation. The fact is, however, that wearables are en vogue and are used for many different cases.
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Photo: huge data server

Big Data: breaking the curse of dimensionality

24/08/2015

The term big data is complex. On one hand, it describes the amount of data itself while characterizing the technology required to collect and analyze the data on the other. The fact is big data is essential in medicine. Data-supported models not only assist in promoting medical research, they also make it easier to reach treatment decisions.
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Radiopharmaceuticals: Individualized diagnostics and therapy

03/08/2015

Malignant tumors can be fought with X-rays – usually with radiation therapy from outside the body. Nuclear medicine physicians can also accomplish this inside the body with radioactive materials, called radiopharmaceuticals. They also offer big benefits for clinical diagnostics as long as a specific target can be assigned to them.
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Photo: Prof. Thea Koch

Tele-ICU care also benefits physicians

22/07/2015

Tele-ICU care with which the U.S. has already had excellent experiences is meant to also be implemented in Germany so facilities are able to provide their patients with optimal care. MEDICA-tradefair.com spoke with Prof. Thea Koch, President of the German Society for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine about this subject.
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Photo: People with covered faces

Data protection: Can medical research be anonymized?

08/07/2015

Electronic health records, telemedicine, cloud computing and big data: questions about data protection appear everywhere in digitized health care. Yet what do things look like far away from application at the foundations of medicine? Can patient data and personal rights in research be protected when several centers and numerous researchers participate in studies?
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ECG measurements: "Our chest strap moistens itself"

01/07/2015

When measuring myocardial activity, it is important for the skin to always stay moist under the electrodes of the ECG. Only then can data be consistently transferred. Athletes have an easier time with this: they are used to sweating. This is a lot harder for older patients.
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Transcatheter Pacing System: The world’s smallest cardiac pacemaker

01/07/2015

In the case of cardiac arrhythmia, the normal heart rate gets out of balance due to various reasons. In some cases, it is necessary to implant a cardiac pacemaker. Just like with any intervention, this type of surgery also involves risks. In the worst-case scenario, this can lead to abnormal wound healing or obliteration of the vascular system.
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Cancer Immunotherapy: Individual mutations as new target structures

01/06/2015

A tumor is as unique as the person who is affected by it. For a long time, it was assumed this would make treatment more difficult since cancer drugs are not able to be one hundred percent effective in targeting the affected cells. In this interview with MEDICA.de, Professor Ugur Sahin explains why it is precisely these individual mutations that make him hopeful for a new type of therapy.
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Lung cancer: A blood test evaluates the effectiveness of therapy

01/06/2015

Can liquid biopsies become the new trend in cancer diagnostics? The medical world has asked this question for quite some time. The first globally approved liquid biopsy-based test for lung cancer shows that this can work. Yet further findings and research are still required to establish this less invasive method in diagnostics.
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Tumor markers: State-of-the-art diagnostics for personalized medicine

01/06/2015

When cancer is diagnosed, the terms tumor markers or biomarkers keep popping up. They describe characteristics that are not found in healthy persons. The classic tumor markers can be easily detected in blood samples or other body fluids. Other analysis methods require more effort. Yet they all share one thing in common: biomarkers indicate a potential tumor.
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Early cancer detection: "Physicians and patients need a good database"

04/05/2015

Whether it is a mammogram, colonoscopy or a skin cancer screening – after a certain age, we are subject to various early cancer detection screenings. Yet many of us don’t know that these screening tests are also associated with risks. This is something what Dr. Sylvia Sänger from the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf discovered in a study.
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Statutory Skin Cancer Screening: "This is not just about mortality rates"

04/05/2015

Since the end of April 2015, the long-awaited evaluation report on the skin cancer screening programs offered by German health insurance providers is now finally available. We spoke with Dr. Ralph von Kiedrowski, Board Member of the German Dermatologist Association (German: Berufsverband Deutscher Dermatologen) on what the screening can accomplish and his take on the G-BA report.
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Photo: One green apple between many red ones

Rare Diseases: All information online at ZIPSE

08/04/2015

They are rare, often under-researched and it is difficult to learn about them – rare diseases. Patients, family members and even physicians frequently have a hard time finding qualitative information on diagnosis and treatment options or specialized care providers. Thanks to the Central Information Portal for Rare Diseases, ZIPSE, this should soon change.
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Physician and patient: A complicated relationship

01/04/2015

The doctor-patient relationship isn’t always easy. On the one hand is the physician, who is responsible for helping many patients. On the other hand is the patient, who visits the doctor in the hopes of his or her problem being treatable. Things always get difficult when one of them feels that they don’t see eye-to-eye. And this happens a lot.
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The patient's perspective is also important for physicians

01/04/2015

Communication is the key to success when it comes to the patient-physician relationship. Compared to the past however, this relationship has changed somewhat: although physicians are still the experts, thanks to the internet and popular science, patients now also know more about health and diseases. An "informed patient" is not a problem for physicians, but rather a source of better understanding.
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Photo: Knee operation

Cartilage Registry: "We generate fully independent data"

23/03/2015

Does a patient benefit from treatment or not? How many patients are being treated as a result of damaged cartilage in the knee joint? What intervention is performed most frequently? These and other questions are meant to be answered in the future with the help of a new Cartilage Registry, which was created by the German Society for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery.
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Photo: pink bird on top of the membrane

Gently administering drugs with a membrane containing active ingredients

09/02/2015

Injections are not popular with either children or adults. For years, researchers have therefore been looking for a way to administer drugs in a gentler manner. Swiss scientists now developed a membrane that releases active ingredients under ultraviolet light. It could revolutionize how drugs and vaccines are being administered.
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Photo: Child in hospital

Pediatric pathology: Specialized knowledge for the youngest

02/02/2015

When children are sick, their parents take them to a pediatrician. A pediatric pathologist is needed when pathology exams need to be conducted. This branch of pathology requires specialized knowledge. The Society for Pediatric and Fetal Pathologists is championing the transfer and preservation of this knowledge.
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Photo: Patient at the ICU

"We simply want to improve intensive care medicine"

22/01/2015

Something we learned from nuclear power plants: since 2010, peer reviews are being conducted in German intensive care units. These voluntary peer reviews are primarily intended to improve the quality of intensive care medicine. Ultimately, it is not just the patient, but also the hospital that benefits from this.
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Photo: Scene from a play

"Art and culture are well suited for all areas of healthcare"

08/01/2015

Theater, choir, photography – art and culture soothe the soul. Professor Erwin Wagner of the University of Hildesheim Foundation, who founded the "KulturStation" project together with the AMEOS Clinic, is sure of this. Patients and associates of the hospital’s psychiatric unit were involved in artistic activities. The goal was to improve well-being.
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Photo: Bacteria

Fecal microbiota transplantation: A stranger’s stool heals inflammatory bowel disease

05/01/2015

It sounds strange: During fecal microbiota transplantation, the stool of a healthy donor is transferred into the intestines of a diseased patient to restore his or her damaged gut flora. This is an entirely normal process in the animal kingdom. Now the stool transplant has established itself as the standard for treating Clostridium difficile.
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Photo: interaction between the proteins

IBD: When genetics and environment interact

05/01/2015

T-cells are the guardians of our immune system. When they show changes, it can lead to severe inflammatory responses in the body. It is believed that the T-cells in persons who are affected by inflammatory bowel disease don’t work properly. Two proteins that can be found on activated T-cells and that interact with each other are now being analyzed.
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Euthanasia – A Human Right?

01/12/2014

Several weeks ago on November 1, 2014, 29-year-old Brittany Maynard, who suffered from terminal brain cancer, took drugs to end her life surrounded by her family. This was preceded by months of despair and anguish, but also by love and a lust for life as the young woman describes in several videos she recorded to fight for the right to die with dignity.
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Making Your Own End-of-Life Decisions: “All options of palliative care, pain management and continued life need to have been explained to the patient“

01/12/2014

How does a physician handle a patient, who wants to die and what rights do I actually have as a patient? Legal practitioners do not automatically answer these and other questions. We talked about this subject with MD-PhD Ralf Jox from the Institute of Ethics, History and Theory of Medicine at the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Germany.
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“When patient monitoring becomes too intensive, it violates human dignity and human rights“

01/12/2014

Modern medical technology shortens and makes care processes easier, while it ensures the safety of patients at the same time. However, monitoring or electronic sensors for remote surveillance keep being accompanied by ethical violations. Patients feel like they are being watched and in the worst-case scenario, robbed of their freedom and autonomy.
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Photo: Gold piece surrounded by black ones

Genetics: “We try to simplify diagnosis for rare diseases“

10/11/2014

Sometimes your TV is actually right and diagnosing an illness is really a puzzle. This is the case with rare diseases for example, which only affect a small portion of the population. Physicians are then confronted with the problem of not having enough experience with a specific illness and its symptoms to be able to make a diagnosis.
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Photo: Dr. Anna-Maria Liphardt

Laboratory in Space: Hot on the Trails of Cartilage Degradation

01/10/2014

On November 10, 2014, astronaut Alexander Gerst will return to Earth from the International Space Station (ISS). He is not just anxiously expected by his family, but also by Dr. Anna-Maria Liphardt from the Institute of Biomechanics and Orthopedics at the German Sport University Cologne
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Photo: Nurse in the OR checks a list

Surgical safety checklists: patient safety to check off

08/09/2014

You find out after surgery that the left knee was treated instead of the right one. Although such mistakes rarely happen, they can have serious consequences – both for the patient and the image of the physician and the hospital.
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Pediatric anesthesia: "I would object to a specialty medical training"

01/09/2014

When very young children already need to be in the operating room, it’s not just the parents that are concerned. This type of situation is a special challenge for the entire operating team, because children are always very special patients - especially since they are not just simply small grown-ups!
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Multi-resistant bacteria want to conquer the world

01/08/2014

Bacteria lurk everywhere: on the skin, in the intestines and in every puddle. Most of them that are hanging out in the human body are good bacteria. But not all of them. Those pathogens that exhibit resistance and are thus very hard to combat are the most dangerous kind. Their spread threatens people all over the world.
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Photo: Overweight people from behind

Diabetes mellitus: dangerous consequences, good prevention options

22/07/2014

Diabetes is a lifestyle disease that could result in dangerous consequences for the individual patient and the entire society. However, you can successfully stop this disease with targeted prevention methods.
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Fat is the best medicine: "Adipose tissue contains many multipotent stem cells, approximately 500 times more than bone marrow"

01/07/2014

The not so popular “love handles“ could revolutionize medicine in the near future. In cooperation with the University of Rostock (Professor Hermann Seitz), the human med AG Company currently seeks to develop a device that is able to gently remove adipose tissue during surgery and subsequently isolate stem cells.
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Sports and cancer: no panacea, but a necessary aid

02/06/2014

When are sports healthy, how often should you engage in sports and what effect do sports have on the body – over the past few decades, there were always different answers to these questions. Many studies that were conducted in the past however confirm the assumption that sports and exercise always support health, even if someone is already sick.
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Photo: Patient with a walking aid in the hospital

Quality in health care: "It is about the welfare of treated patients"

22/05/2014

Measuring quality in health care is not easy. Controlling it doesn’t just provide challenges for the medical sector, but also for policy makers. This is why measuring and representation systems for quality in hospitals as well as improvement concepts are being developed at the IGES Institute.
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Medical apps: functionality and safety is key

02/05/2014

Successful communication is most important in medicine. The most modern channels have been utilized in this area for quite some time now. Medical apps need to meet several requirements at once. For their use to pay off, they need to be beneficial for prevention or therapy. And to ensure a safe application, they also need to be both technically and medically flawless.
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mHealth Alliance: "Mobile health has the potential to improve healthcare for millions"

02/05/2014

Whether in remote areas or in a large city – people everywhere need good healthcare. Thanks to mobile health, more and more people can get medical help, even in poor regions of the world.
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Mobile assistance systems: "The device automatically notifies if something is not right"

02/05/2014

Staying active and mobile when you are old – who doesn’t want that? People suffering from dementia can often only dream about that. The fear of not finding your way back home or not getting any help in an emergency severally restricts many affected people in the way they live their lives. Yet there are many people, who could still independently participate in life despite mild dementia.
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"The secrets of an astronaut's health and fitness"

24/03/2014

He is kind of a "Bones" McCoy, since he keeps astronauts fit: Dr. Simon Evetts leads the Medical Projects and Technology team within the Medical Support Office of the European Astronauts Centre in Cologne, Germany. MEDICA.de talked to him about sports in universe, space technology and the benefits for us earthlings.
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Seminars for physicians: "Physicians are obligated to continue their education for the safety of their patients"

04/03/2014

Continuing education is an integral part of the medical profession, because research continuously delivers new findings that sooner or later make their way into patient treatments. How does an event need to be organized to provide the highest level of benefit for the participants? MEDICA.de spoke with Eva Ningel, Managing Director for beta seminare bonn berlin GmbH (bsbb).
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Radiology and technology: "Numerous phantom studies have been conducted that prove the advantages of this new CT system"

03/02/2014

Radiologists usually do their work after oncologists when it comes to cancer treatment. Yet modern radiology also provides treatments at this point. MEDICA.de spoke with Professor Stefan Schönberg, Director of the Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine at the University Medical Center Mannheim, Germany, about the use of a new computer tomograph and its benefits for patients.
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Photo: Man and woman visit a physician

"Gender-specific adjustments in clinical diagnostics and therapy can be expected"

15/01/2014

In Western civilization, equality of women and men has been a topic for many years and is already being successfully implemented in many areas, even if many obstacles still need to be overcome – the introduction of quotas for women in boardrooms, just to mention one of them.
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"The Virus Manipulates the Host Cell on Different Levels"

08/01/2014

Heart diseases can be triggered by special viruses that affect the cardiac muscle. Preventive drugs could definitely be developed – if the virus does not mutate.
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Study approach: surgical trials mean more safety in the operating room

06/01/2014

Whether a surgical suture is better applied manually or with a surgical stapler can be determined through trial and error. Determining which method guarantees patient safety best should also not just be based on a surgeon’s experience. Controlled studies are the method of choice to assess both well-proven and new techniques in the operating room.
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