Image: Hand is holding a plastic frame with golden membranes inside; Copyright: DGIST

Brand-new cochlear implant technology born from frictional electricity


DGIST Professor Hongsoo Choi (Department of Robotics Engineering) and his research team developed the world's first artificial basilar membrane that mimics the cochlear function by application of the genetic principle of frictional electricity.
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Image: A 3D stick figure creates a mind map about

A new broom sweeps clean? The new EU Medical Device Regulation


The year 2016 brings about the new, eagerly anticipated Medical Device Regulation (MDR). The revision needs to now be implemented by all EU member states in the coming years after there have been ongoing deliberations and negotiations since October 2012.
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Image: a 3-D printed multimaterial shape-memory minigripper; Copyright: Photo courtesy of Qi (Kevin) Ge

3-D-printed structures "remember" their shapes


Engineers from MIT and Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) are using light to print three-dimensional structures that "remember" their original shapes.
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Image: Gloved hand holds a piece of white fleece; Copyright: Hohenstein Institute

Wound dressings made from bacterial alginate


Researchers have succeeded in mapping out for the first time a complete production and treatment process, from using biotechnology to produce bacterial alginate, right through to producing fibres and manufacturing textile materials.
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Photo: Hospital  bed

Textiles used in hospitals and medical offices – germs don’t stand a chance


Some hospitals have long banned the status symbol of physicians – the white coat. Research has shown that especially the sleeves were contaminated with various types of bacteria. But it’s not just lab coats that can spread germs in healthcare settings. This field uses a variety of different textiles. Wouldn’t it, therefore, make sense to apply antimicrobial finishes?
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Photo: Stent in human body

Safe or Not Safe? "The AB-DES has not gained market access in countries like Japan or the U.S."


Antibody-coated, drug-eluting stents (AB-DES) feature an exterior coated with immunosuppressant drugs and an interior that is coated with antibodies to accelerate the adhesion of endothelial cells. In theory, this makes it possible to shorten the duration of therapy with blood thinners, which can mean relief for patients from an already difficult situation.
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Photo: ceramic joints

Knee at your fingertips


How can you print ceramics, what purpose do they have and how benefits medical technology? Answers provides Dr. Tassilo Moritz from Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems IKTS.
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Photo: Printer head over a glass sheet

Melt electrospinning writing: polymer fibers for tissue engineering


Sometimes, soft tissue in our body needs to be replaced after surgery or an injury. But surgeons are not always able to take tissue from other body parts as a replacement. Then, they need to use implants. The production of soft implants that can constantly endure load and stress like our own tissue is a big challenge for research. Melt electrospinning writing can be a solution.
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Theranostics: Complex particles for tomorrow's medicine


It is a portmanteau, a mixture of two words. This way it saves us time and trouble while speaking because the human speech apparatus is lazy. And it describes a mixture of procedures: the combination of two procedures that would normally be separate in medicine. We are talking about theranostics.
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Photo: Stents

Stents: Braiding versus cutting


Braided stents are nothing new in medicine, but their manufacturing process is still time-consuming. This is why Professor Stefan Jockenhövel from the RWTH Aachen University and his team want to make machine production possible.
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Photo: pink bird on top of the membrane

Gently administering drugs with a membrane containing active ingredients


Injections are not popular with either children or adults. For years, researchers have therefore been looking for a way to administer drugs in a gentler manner. Swiss scientists now developed a membrane that releases active ingredients under ultraviolet light. It could revolutionize how drugs and vaccines are being administered.
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