Image: A scale; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Frank Peters

Lifetime weight gain linked to esophageal and stomach cancers

17/02/2017

People who are overweight in their twenties and become obese later in life may be three times more likely to develop cancer of either the oesophagus (food pipe) or upper stomach, according to a study published in the "British Journal of Cancer".
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Data mining tools for personalized cancer treatment

14/02/2017

In the laboratories of Institute of Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), drug testing is done ex vivo. That is, various leukemia drugs are tested with patient samples instead of the patients themselves. This enables the researchers to test different drug combinations efficiently and without burdening the patient.
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Image: Different kinds of nuts; Copyright: panthermedia.net/fotokris44

Hard shell - healthy kernel

10/02/2017

Roasted and salted, ground as a baking ingredient or fresh from the shell - for all those who enjoy eating nuts, there is good news from nutritionists at Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Germany). Their latest research shows that nuts can inhibit the growth of cancer cells.
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Image: Colored cells under the microscope; Copyright: Laboratoire Bourquin - UNIFR/UNIGE

Method for screening the most useful nanoparticles for medicine

10/02/2017

The use of nanoparticles - small, virus-sized elements developed under laboratory conditions - is increasingly widespread in the world of biomedicine. This rapidly-evolving technology offers hope for many medical applications, whether for diagnosis or therapies.
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UK: salt reduction strategies do not address health inequalities

07/02/2017

New research conducted by the University of Liverpool in partnership with the universities of Gdansk and Manchester shows that current salt reduction strategy in England has failed to reduce existing inequalities in salt consumption, cardiovascular disease, and gastric cancer burdens.
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Image: Older woman using a cell phone; Copyright: panthermedia.net/luna123

Cancer survivors find online and telephone communication beneficial

06/02/2017

Researchers from the School of Health Sciences at the University of Surrey have completed the first ever systematic review of cancer survivors’ experience of online and telephone telehealth interventions in cancer care, a new study in the Journal of Medical Internet Research reports.
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Image: A team of young people is standing together in a circle, putting their hands together; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Kzenon

Yes, we can! Yes, I can! – World Cancer Day, 02/04/2017

31/01/2017

At MEDICA-tradefair.com, we have already commemorated World Cancer Day quite often. But why? Because cancer is an omnipresent topic. Most certainly, sooner or later, directly or indirectly, each and every one of us will get in touch with it – when we develop cancer ourselves or a person close to us does.
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Diabetes or its rapid deterioration can be an early warning sign for pancreatic cancer

30/01/2017

Patients and their doctors should be aware that the onset of diabetes, or a rapid deterioration in existing diabetes that requires more aggressive treatment, could be a sign of early, hidden pancreatic cancer.
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Image: grahpic of a woman showing cervical cancer, ; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Sebastian Kaulitzki

Cervical cancer death rates higher among older and black women

24/01/2017

A woman's risk of dying of cervical cancer is higher than long believed, particularly among older and black women, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health-led research suggests.
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Image: Stylized Image of Prostate Cancer From a Man with a Brca2 Mutation; Copyright: Monash University

Aggressive prostate cancer secrets revealed in landmark study

11/01/2017

A landmark study, led by Monash University's Biomedicine Discovery Institute with the involvement of the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, has revealed the reason why men with a family history of prostate cancer who also carry the BRCA2 gene fault have a more aggressive form of prostate cancer.
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Image: Halved lemon from above, half filled with tablets;; Copyright: panthermedia.net / brozova

Why high-dose vitamin C kills cancer cells

11/01/2017

Vitamin C has a patchy history as a cancer therapy, but researchers at the University of Iowa believe that is because it has often been used in a way that guarantees failure.
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Image: Molecular model of piperlongumine; Copyright: UT Southwestern

Researchers uncover mechanism for cancer-killing properties of pepper plant

05/01/2017

UT Southwestern Medical Center scientists have uncovered the chemical process behind anti-cancer properties of a spicy Indian pepper plant called the long pepper, whose suspected medicinal properties date back thousands of years.
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Image: Bacteria in a culture dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Anna Puhan

Using 'fire to fight fire' to combat disease could make it worse

03/01/2017

A treatment billed as a potential breakthrough in the fight against disease, including cancer, could back-fire and make the disease fitter and more damaging, new research has found. Ground-breaking research has found that introducing 'friendlier' less-potent strains into a population of disease-causing microbes can lead to increased disease severity.
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Image: Three physicians during a meeting; Copyright: KiTZ/Philipp Benjamin

Children's Tumor Center: consolidated treatment under one roof

02/01/2017

Treatments for children need to be different from treatment for adults – this also applies in oncology. Having said that, children do not just need new and different treatment concepts that still necessitate research. They also require the support from their families, who need to be nearby during treatment.
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Image: A young girl is lying in the hospital bed, behind her a nurse is adjusting a monitor; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Monkeybusiness Images

Working with children with cancer – More than just a job

02/01/2017

Our topic title "pediatric (children’s) oncology" evoked strong emotional reactions from several mothers and fathers of our staff. "This hits too close to home for me, I couldn’t write about it", or "How do people manage to deal with this?". And we are only on the sidelines; physicians, caregivers and nurses at the hospital, hospice or families at home are the ones that have the real tough job.
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Image: A bowl filled with red chili peppers; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Nitrub

Spicy molecule inhibits growth of breast cancer cells

22/12/2016

Capsaicin, an active ingredient of pungent substances such as chilli or pepper, inhibits the growth of breast cancer cells. This was reported by a team headed by the Bochum-based scent researcher Prof. Hanns Hatt and Dr Lea Weber, following experiments in cultivated tumour cells.
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Image: A man is pulling an empty pocket out of his pants; Copyright: panthermedia.net/David Koscheck

Cancer costs leaving patients in debt

20/12/2016

Cancer patients are ending up in debt because they have to cover the costs of treatment as well as other care related expenses, researchers report.
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Image: Automated laboratory device is filling sampling tubes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/luchschen

Immunotherapy: identifying suitable tumor antigens by mass spectrometry

20/12/2016

New cancer therapies harness the immune system to fight tumors. One of the main principles behind these therapies is to find out precisely which molecules on cancer cells trigger an immune response. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry has for the first time identified suitable protein structures directly from patients' tumor cells.
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Photo: Microscope in a laboratory; Copyright: Ralf Mohr; Fraunhofer ITEM

Scientists discover new mechanisms of early metastatic spread in breast cancer

16/12/2016

Scientists of the Regensburg-based Project Group for Personalized Tumor Therapy (Fraunhofer ITEM/University of Regensburg) and colleagues from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai discovered new mechanisms of early metastatic spread in breast cancer. Results have been published in the latest issue of the renowned journal Nature.
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Image: A red heart behind a wall made of sugar cubes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Moise Marius Dorin

Heart damage caused by chemotherapy is worse in diabetics

13/12/2016

Heart damage caused by chemotherapy is worse in cancer patients who also have diabetes, according to a study. "Cardiotoxicity induced by chemotherapy with anthracyclines is being increasingly reported, mainly because a smaller proportion of patients now die from cancer," said lead author Dr Ana Catarina Gomes, a cardiologist in training at the Hospital Garcia de Orta in Almada, Portugal.
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Image: Graphic of tumorcells; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Vitanovski

Tumor cells are dependent on fat to start metastasis

08/12/2016

A study headed by Salvador Aznar Benitah, ICREA researcher at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona), and published today in Nature identifies metastasis-initiating cells through a specific marker, namely the protein CD36. This protein, which is found in the membranes of tumour cells, is responsible for taking up fatty acids.
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Image: Nuts in a bowl with a spoon; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Jiri Hera

A handful of nuts a day cuts the risk of a wide range of diseases

05/12/2016

A large analysis of current research shows that people who eat at least 20g of nuts a day have a lower risk of heart disease, cancer and other diseases.
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Image: Operation table with medical instruments; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Jörg Horstmann

A new probe may aid in complete removal of cancer tissue during surgery

02/12/2016

An optical fiber probe can distinguish cancer tissue and normal tissue at the margins of a tumor being excised, in real time, by detecting the difference in pH between the two types of tissue. This has the potential to help surgeons avoid removing too much healthy tissue during surgery and also avoid performing additional surgeries later to remove any cancer tissue left behind.
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Image: Graphic of a tumor cell; Copyright: panthermedia.net/eraxion

New ways to measure solid stress in tumors could lead to improved understanding, therapies

30/11/2016

Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators have developed new methods for mapping and measuring solid stress - the force exerted by solid and elastic components - within tumors, an accomplishment that may lead to improved understanding of those forces and their consequences and to novel treatment strategies.
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Photo: Old woman with a smartphone

Health Apps: "Mobile Applications for smartphones have strengths and weaknesses"

22/03/2016

Medical apps like diabetes or high blood pressure diaries are becoming increasingly popular with smartphone users. There are many available choices out there but they are not always clear. Added to this is the question of how the data collected by the apps can be sensibly incorporated into treatment.
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Graphic: The pancreas and the surrounding organs

Pancreatic cancer: diagnosis via signature analysis

08/03/2016

Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest forms of cancer because it is difficult to diagnose and only presents with symptoms in the later stages. In the future, a laboratory test developed at the Greifswald University Medicine could make an early detection of this type of cancer and consequently a faster and better treatment possible.
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Image: Esophageal Cancer

Esophageal cancer: increased patient safety thanks to the ”Da Vinci“ surgical system

09/11/2015

Interview with Professor Jürgen Weitz, Director of the Clinic and Polyclinic of Visceral, Thoracic, and Vascular Surgery, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus at the Technical University Dresden
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Fighting myomas with ultrasound

01/10/2015

A proper diagnosis is a part of great therapy. However, it can also be beneficial to be able to quickly respond to changes during a treatment. One example of this is the treatment of uterine myomas. Female patients at the University Hospital Bonn are treated using so-called high-intensity focused ultrasound, HIFU in short. Prof. Holger Strunk explains this procedure.
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From the periodic table of elements into medicine: silicon for theranostics

01/10/2015

Semiconductor nanoparticles for biomedical applications have been researched for some time now. Not only are they millionths of a millimeter in size, they also offer great potential for cancer diagnostics and therapy, so-called theranostics. They enter cells, are activated by ultrasonic radiation and destroy the cells using the generated vibration.
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Theranostics: Complex particles for tomorrow's medicine

01/10/2015

It is a portmanteau, a mixture of two words. This way it saves us time and trouble while speaking because the human speech apparatus is lazy. And it describes a mixture of procedures: the combination of two procedures that would normally be separate in medicine. We are talking about theranostics.
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Prostate cancer: Agent with theranostic potential

03/08/2015

Endoradiotherapy can be very unpleasant for cancer patients, since it does not only harm tumor cells, but also healthy ones. Sometimes, patients even need to stop therapy because of the side effects. Physicians and researchers are thus continuously searching for ways to transport radiopharmaceuticals directly and exclusively to their target.
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Photo: Image with red luminous bladder, next cystoscope

Making the invisible visible with fluorescence

22/06/2015

Bladder tumors have different growth characteristics. In most cases, they are limited to the inner wall of the bladder and thus well resectable. Unlike carcinoma in situ, which becomes muscle invasive after a certain amount of time. To be able to completely remove the tumor during resection, photodynamic diagnostics (PDD) can make sense.
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Cancer Immunotherapy: Individual mutations as new target structures

01/06/2015

A tumor is as unique as the person who is affected by it. For a long time, it was assumed this would make treatment more difficult since cancer drugs are not able to be one hundred percent effective in targeting the affected cells. In this interview with MEDICA.de, Professor Ugur Sahin explains why it is precisely these individual mutations that make him hopeful for a new type of therapy.
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Lung cancer: A blood test evaluates the effectiveness of therapy

01/06/2015

Can liquid biopsies become the new trend in cancer diagnostics? The medical world has asked this question for quite some time. The first globally approved liquid biopsy-based test for lung cancer shows that this can work. Yet further findings and research are still required to establish this less invasive method in diagnostics.
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Tumor markers: State-of-the-art diagnostics for personalized medicine

01/06/2015

When cancer is diagnosed, the terms tumor markers or biomarkers keep popping up. They describe characteristics that are not found in healthy persons. The classic tumor markers can be easily detected in blood samples or other body fluids. Other analysis methods require more effort. Yet they all share one thing in common: biomarkers indicate a potential tumor.
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Cancer prevention: Beneficial and ultimately personal

04/05/2015

There are many decisions to be made in an adult life; among them are cancer prevention screenings. They are voluntary and many people deliberate whether they should go or not and if they would actually want to know the results. Science, politics and health care professionals also ponder with each new preventive service whether it is beneficial and who should end up paying for it.
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Early cancer detection: "Physicians and patients need a good database"

04/05/2015

Whether it is a mammogram, colonoscopy or a skin cancer screening – after a certain age, we are subject to various early cancer detection screenings. Yet many of us don’t know that these screening tests are also associated with risks. This is something what Dr. Sylvia Sänger from the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf discovered in a study.
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Statutory Skin Cancer Screening: "This is not just about mortality rates"

04/05/2015

Since the end of April 2015, the long-awaited evaluation report on the skin cancer screening programs offered by German health insurance providers is now finally available. We spoke with Dr. Ralph von Kiedrowski, Board Member of the German Dermatologist Association (German: Berufsverband Deutscher Dermatologen) on what the screening can accomplish and his take on the G-BA report.
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Photo: Object slides

Tissue storage: "Our top biobanks are internationally leading the charge"

02/02/2015

Only projects with a solid foundation are successful in the long run. This is also true for science. Biobanks are the most important component of this foundation when it comes to fundamental biomedical research: Only high quality tissue samples that are stored there make conclusive research possible - for example in search of the causes of tumorigenesis.
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Xenon magnetic resonance imaging: making pathological changes in the body visible

03/11/2014

As an imaging procedure, magnetic resonance tomography has become essential in clinical practice, since it can easily make organs and tissue visible. However, until now abnormal cancer cells or small centers of inflammation remained almost invisible. Now cell biologists from Berlin, Germany, have succeeded in fixing this problem with xenon magnetic resonance imaging.
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KOHALA: digital student for cancer treatment

03/02/2014

Shortening a time-consuming procedure from four hours to five minutes and automate it at the same time sounds like a dream come true for employees in all fields and industry sectors. This dream could soon become a reality for radiologists. Software could take away the tedious processing of CT images, which is required before cancer radiation therapy.
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Radiology and technology: "Numerous phantom studies have been conducted that prove the advantages of this new CT system"

03/02/2014

Radiologists usually do their work after oncologists when it comes to cancer treatment. Yet modern radiology also provides treatments at this point. MEDICA.de spoke with Professor Stefan Schönberg, Director of the Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine at the University Medical Center Mannheim, Germany, about the use of a new computer tomograph and its benefits for patients.
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Surgery: "Our camera detects the tiniest remainder of a tumor"

03/02/2014

Differentiating tumor tissue from healthy tissue isn’t always easy for surgeons. Scattered cancer cells and early cancer are often hard to detect with the naked eye. A special camera now makes even the tiniest remainder of a tumor visible during surgery.
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Photo: Removal of a colon polyp with a snare

Endoscopy: "A small section of the colonic wall is completely removed"

05/01/2014

Eventually, all adults need to see a physician for colon cancer prevention. While the exam goes by quickly thanks to sedation, it sometimes leads to a follow-up procedure if a growth in the colon could not be removed with the endoscope and requires open surgery.
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