Image: Young boy eating cereals for breakfast; Copyright: Pics

New research delimits the possible causes of celiac disease


The amount of gluten could be a more important clue than breast-feeding or the timing of the introduction of gluten for continued research into the causes of celiac disease (gluten intolerance). This is one of the findings from several extensive studies of children with an increased genetic risk of celiac disease conducted by researchers at Lund University in Sweden.
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Image: Drawing of a rat and green tea and in the middle a heart. The green background is full of green leafs; Copyright: Kyoto University

Drinking green tea to prevent artery explosion


According to new research, green tea could prevent a deadly condition in the body's main artery. A Kyoto University team has found that abdominal aortic aneurysm - a condition in which the main artery becomes overstretched and bloated - developed less frequently in rats that drank green tea polyphenol, a major component of green tea.
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Olympic stomach upsets – leaky gut symdrome?


A number of competitors at the Rio Olympics have reported stomach problems. Team GB officials have denied that athletes have fallen victim to food poisoning at the Olympic athletes' village in Rio, despite a number complaining of upset stomachs.
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Personalized nutrition is better than a 'one size fits all' approach


People receiving personalised nutrition advice develop healthier eating habits including consuming less red meat and reducing their salt intake, a study has found. A website has also been shown to be effective at helping people make important changes to their eating patterns.
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Image: Raw steak on the barbeque; Copyright: Jürgens

Meat consumption contributing to global obesity


Should we be warning consumers about over-consumption of meat as well as sugar? That's the question being raised by a team of researchers from the University of Adelaide, who say meat in the modern diet offers surplus energy, and is contributing to the prevalence of global obesity.
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Photo: Devices and products patients need to treat their diabetes

Artificial pancreas: an (almost) automated diabetes treatment?


The treatment for diabetes is very time-consuming for patients: they need to regularly monitor blood sugar levels, take medication and inject insulin. Poor self-management may result in a dangerous lapse in blood glucose levels. Yet external factors can also contribute to diabetes being out of control. An artificial pancreas system could offer relief.
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Photo: Child gets pierced into the finger using a lancing device

Diabetes: comprehensive prevention, early "vaccination"?


A diagnosis of diabetes often catches new patients off guard - for instance if they end up in the emergency room suffering from metabolic decompensation. Children are often affected by this. Their immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas early on in their lives, thus causing type 1 diabetes.
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Multiple Sclerosis: does the colon affect the immune system?


Multiple sclerosis apparently can strike anyone - regardless of age, family history, lifestyle or gender. Yet why then does it not strike everyone? Genetic and environmental factors appear not to be the only reason whether it develops or not. The countless microorganisms that colonize our intestinal tract could also be involved in this.
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Photo: Small POC test kit for blood samples; Copyright: bate-web/Spelleken

Nutrition: finding intolerances in the blood


More and more people suffer from allergies and food intolerances. Laboratory diagnosis for these often takes long and can be inaccurate. Healthcare practitioners increasingly rely on point-of-care tests to avoid costly laboratory tests and quickly find solutions for their patients.
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Small companions: How wearables change our lives


They can be seen everywhere: at the wrists, in the ear, clipped to the belt. Wearables are small technical assistants who are built to collect and partially also to analyze data. Some of them collect measurable health data, others "only" count their user’s steps or measure the surrounding UV radiation. The fact is, however, that wearables are en vogue and are used for many different cases.
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Photo: Boss and employees

"Employees, who like to contribute their talents, stay healthy"


Dr. Walter Kromm, Master of Public Health, is not just a general practitioner, but also a health advisor for management professionals. During his many years of practical experience, he kept realizing how important employee health is for the health of an entire company.
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