Image: A hospital room with two children in their beds; Copyright: panthermedia.net/zurijeta

Increased risk of pneumococcal pneumonia with hospital admission

19/09/2016

A study shows that adults admitted to hospital during school holidays are 38 percent more likely to have pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) than those admitted during term time.
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Image: Image shows blue virus on black background; Copyright: Panthermedia.net/vichly

New model improves prediction of outbreaks of Ebola and Lassa fever

06/09/2016

Potential outbreaks of diseases such as Ebola and Lassa fever may be more accurately predicted thanks to a new mathematical model developed by researchers at the University of Cambridge. This could in turn help inform public health messages to prevent outbreaks spreading more widely.
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Image: Peroxiredoxin Function; Copyright: Graphic courtesy of Oregon State University

Protein could open door to new class of antibiotics

02/09/2016

Researchers have made the first-ever detailed, atomic-level images of a peroxiredoxin, which has revealed a peculiar characteristic of this protein and might form the foundation for a new approach to antibiotics.
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Image: blood samples in test tubes; Copyright: USMC/Wikimedia Commons

People with type O blood more likely to die of cholera

30/08/2016

People with blood type O often get more severely ill from cholera than people of other blood types. New research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis may explain why.
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Image: An x-ray picture of a lung showing signs of tuberculosis; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ Martin Fally

Number of tuberculosis cases in India is double current estimates

26/08/2016

The number of cases of tuberculosis (TB) in India may be up to two to three times higher than current estimates, suggests a new study.
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Image: A pregnant woman. In the center is an image of a mosquito and the word

Yale study identifies how Zika virus infects the placenta

22/08/2016

In a new study, Yale researchers demonstrate Zika virus infection of cells derived from human placentas. The research provides insight into how Zika virus may be transmitted from expectant mother to fetus, resulting in infection of the fetal brain. The study was published online in JCI Insight.
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Image: Bacteria are flowing to hospital's entrance; Copyright: Panthermedia.net/lightsource

New maths to predict dangerous hospital epidemics

18/08/2016

Mathematicians are now developing completely new statistical calculations on the world’s fastest computers in order to be able to predict how epidemics of dangerous hospital bacteria spread. Studying the entire genomes of bacteria has now thrown open entirely new possibilities for revealing their secrets. It is this genetic knowledge that scientists use to understand bacterial epidemics.
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Image: Young asian women is coughing in the street; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Leung Cho Pan

Rapid bacterial infection test reduces antibiotic use

11/08/2016

Researchers from the Oxford University Clinical Research Unit in Vietnam have shown that using a rapid (5-minute) test can reduce antibiotic misuse for respiratory infections. Cutting the number of unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions is a key way to prevent the spread of antibiotic-resistant infections.
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Protein in breast milk reduces infection risk in premature infants

26/07/2016

Researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine have found that a manufactured form of lactoferrin, a naturally occurring protein in breast milk, can help protect premature infants from a type of staph infection.
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Image: Zika Map; Copyright: University of Southampton

Study suggests 1.6 million childbearing women could be at risk of Zika virus infection

26/07/2016

Research by scientists in the US and UK has estimated that up to 1.65 million childbearing women in Central and South America could become infected by the Zika virus by the end of the first wave of the epidemic.
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Care in the Shock Room: MEDICA EDUCATION CONFERENCE Offers Internationally-Recognized Course Concept

21/07/2016

One of the many options for doctors from all disciplines is the opportunity to acquire the internationally-recognized Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS®) certificate.
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Graphic: This image shows the AHR-mediated

When suppressing immunity is a good thing

04/07/2016

A receptor, first known for its role in mediating the harmful effects of the environmental pollutant dioxin in our body, is now understood to play other important roles in modulating the innate immune response.
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Photo: Local laboratory technicians work with mobile microscopes.

Phone-based microscopes for rural areas

01/07/2016

Handheld, mobile phone-based microscopes can be used in developing countries after minimal training of community laboratory technicians to diagnose intestinal parasites quickly and accurately.
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Photo: A house in Africa with solar panels on the roof

Saved by the sun

30/06/2016

A new twist on the use of renewable energy is saving children's lives in Africa. The innovation - a solar powered oxygen delivery system - is providing concentrated oxygen in hospital for children suffering from severe pneumonia.
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Photo: physicians at station

Gram-negative bacteria pose a major challenge for hospitals

01/06/2016

Every day, people are admitted to the hospital, discharged or they visit patients. This large number of people increases the risk of bacteria transmission. Preventative measures such as short-sleeved uniforms and copper surfaces can help by improving hospital hygiene but they cannot replace the legal requirements for hygiene measures.
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Photo: Hospital  bed

Textiles used in hospitals and medical offices – germs don’t stand a chance

01/06/2016

Some hospitals have long banned the status symbol of physicians – the white coat. Research has shown that especially the sleeves were contaminated with various types of bacteria. But it’s not just lab coats that can spread germs in healthcare settings. This field uses a variety of different textiles. Wouldn’t it, therefore, make sense to apply antimicrobial finishes?
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Photo: Researcher is looking at a microfluidic LabDisc

Point-of-care-testing: from disc to diagnosis

22/02/2016

Easy solutions that deliver results quickly are a great asset in medicine: patients receive their diagnosis faster and physicians have more time to treat them. Such tools also work without sophisticated resources and trained personal. A device currently developed in a project funded by the European Commission could bring all of this to point-of-care-testing for infectious diseases.
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Graphic of the operation

Filling bone defects – replacement tissue with its own blood supply

01/02/2016

First grow tissue in the lab, then insert it into patients when they need it and you’re done! Unfortunately, things are not as easy as people hoped at the onset of “tissue engineering”. Although robust tissues for bone defects can be grown in a petri dish, for example, they unfortunately quickly die off again inside the body if there is no corresponding nutrient supply.
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Photo: Pregnancy test

Disaster medicine or disastrous medicine?

04/01/2016

Most Europeans think it was a long time ago, but the residents of West Africa clearly feel the consequences of the Ebola epidemic that broke out in December 2013 and still continues today. So far, approximately 11,300 people have died as a result of the outbreak; more than 28,000 contracted the disease.
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Photo: Ebola test

Ebola: detection strips instead of lab tests

04/01/2016

When infectious diseases such as Ebola break out, a rapid diagnosis is important because the early detection of a virus along with the right hygiene measures can prevent its continued spread. However, laboratories and skilled personnel are not available everywhere. Low-cost and portable detection strips can bring relief.
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Rapid Tests: valuable helpers for use in the field

04/01/2016

Infectious diseases are widespread in conflict areas. When basic medical care is lacking on location, people cannot be appropriately treated. Laboratory tests are limited in the field. Rapid diagnostic tests make it possible for medical personnel to quickly and accurately test patients for several infectious diseases, for instance for the presence of malaria or HIV infection.
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Hospitals: many small measures against infections and sepsis

01/08/2014

If neither the immune system nor antibiotics are able to control an infection, a sepsis can arise out of it - an infection that attacks several organs at the same time and causes the immune system to overreact. This is a life-threatening condition.
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Hygiene: "The sensor applies the principle of so-called photonic structures"

01/08/2014

Detecting infections quickly and reliably with the naked eye: This is what many doctors in hospitals and in the doctor's surgeries wish for. To make this dream come true, Prof. Holger Schönherr, a scientist from Siegen, is researching a sensor that should show an infection by a color change.
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Multi-resistant bacteria want to conquer the world

01/08/2014

Bacteria lurk everywhere: on the skin, in the intestines and in every puddle. Most of them that are hanging out in the human body are good bacteria. But not all of them. Those pathogens that exhibit resistance and are thus very hard to combat are the most dangerous kind. Their spread threatens people all over the world.
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"The immunosensory system goes beyond the actual immune cells"

22/01/2014

It guards the body but can become its enemy: the immune system defends us from intruding pathogens; it is also able to cause severe diseases if it falsely recognizes the body itself as a threat. Molecular receptors in the whole body enable the immune system to “sense” what happens within.
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"The Virus Manipulates the Host Cell on Different Levels"

08/01/2014

Heart diseases can be triggered by special viruses that affect the cardiac muscle. Preventive drugs could definitely be developed – if the virus does not mutate.
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