Image: Computer generated image of a head with an implant in the neck that is hit by ultrasound waves; Copyright: Fraunhofer IBMT

Basic structure of ultrasound power supply and communication


Unlike drugs, active implants such as electroceuticals act locally, have fewer side effects and function directly through electrical signals, much like the body itself. Fraunhofer researchers presenting a new technology platform that can power active implants wirelessly via ultrasound. The experts are targeting widespread diseases such as high blood pressure, diabetes and Parkinson's.
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Image: Anatomical model of a human foot; Copyright: Sonja de Sterke/QUT Marketing and Communications

Better diabetic foot disease care would save taxpayers billions


Australia could save billions of dollars in healthcare costs by investing in proven treatments for people with diabetic foot disease, according to QUT research.
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Image: Coloured tissue sample of the pancreas; Copyright: Helmholtz Zentrum München

How does friendly fire happen in the pancreas?


In type 1 diabetes, the body attacks its own insulin-producing cells. Scientists at Helmholtz Zentrum München, partner in the German Center for Diabetes Research, and their colleagues at Technical University of Munich have now reported in the journal PNAS about a mechanism used by the immune system to prepare for this attack.
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Image: Graphic of the micorna connection between pictures of Laurel and Hardy; Copyright: Petra Pollins

Study reveals a biological link between stress and obesity


For the first time - researchers revealed a connection between anxiety and metabolic disorders at the molecular level; the discovery opens new possibilities for detecting and treating both symptoms.
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Image: Elderly woman is exercising; Copyright: Trautmann

Multifaceted genetic impact of training


Endurance training changes the activity of thousands of genes and give rise to a multitude of altered DNA-copies, RNA, researchers from Karolinska Institutet report. The study, which also nuances the concept of muscle memory, is published in the journal PLOS Genetics.
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Image: Graphic of the pancreas and surrounding organs; Copyright:

Unique molecular atlas of pancreas produced


Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have managed to produce the first molecular map of the genes that are active in the various cells of the human pancreas. They have also revealed differences in genetic activity between people with type 2 diabetes and healthy controls.
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Image: A young woman working at a table, wearing a smartwatch; Copyright:

Gap in the market for wearables that monitor sedentary behavior


Sedentary behavior monitoring is under-represented in the wearable tech market, a new study has found. Wearable technology to monitor the time you spend being sedentary could encourage changes in behavior that helps improve health, research reveals.
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Image: Image shows map of modelled PM 2.5 concentration in the Augsburg area; Copyright: Helmholtz Zentrum München

Risk factor air pollution


Exposure to air pollution at the place of residence increases the risk of developing insulin resistance as a pre-diabetic state of type 2 diabetes.
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Sugar addiction: Discovery of a brain sugar switch


Researchers at Technical University of Munich discovered that our brain actively takes sugar from the blood. Prior to this, researchers around the world had assumed that this was a purely passive process.
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Photo: Children play soccer in a park

Hard work pays off: even sick people benefit from physical activity


Children instinctively know this – exercising is fun, makes you happy and keeps you fit. This begs the question of when and why this innate love for movement dwindles in many of us as we get older. After all, diseases like type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure can be considerably controlled with sufficient exercise.
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Photo: Men and women running

Individualized sports medicine: training by design


Exercise makes you healthy – oftentimes even when you are sick. That’s why doctors hardly ever recommend taking a break from it. Even patients who are about to receive a heart transplant can benefit from sports. As is so often the case, the dose makes the poison. We asked sports medicine physician Prof. Martin Halle, what people need to consider.
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Photo: Devices and products patients need to treat their diabetes

Artificial pancreas: an (almost) automated diabetes treatment?


The treatment for diabetes is very time-consuming for patients: they need to regularly monitor blood sugar levels, take medication and inject insulin. Poor self-management may result in a dangerous lapse in blood glucose levels. Yet external factors can also contribute to diabetes being out of control. An artificial pancreas system could offer relief.
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Photo: Child gets pierced into the finger using a lancing device

Diabetes: comprehensive prevention, early "vaccination"?


A diagnosis of diabetes often catches new patients off guard - for instance if they end up in the emergency room suffering from metabolic decompensation. Children are often affected by this. Their immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas early on in their lives, thus causing type 1 diabetes.
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Photo: Old woman with a smartphone

Health Apps: "Mobile Applications for smartphones have strengths and weaknesses"


Medical apps like diabetes or high blood pressure diaries are becoming increasingly popular with smartphone users. There are many available choices out there but they are not always clear. Added to this is the question of how the data collected by the apps can be sensibly incorporated into treatment.
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Graphic: The pancreas and the surrounding organs

Pancreatic cancer: diagnosis via signature analysis


Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest forms of cancer because it is difficult to diagnose and only presents with symptoms in the later stages. In the future, a laboratory test developed at the Greifswald University Medicine could make an early detection of this type of cancer and consequently a faster and better treatment possible.
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Photo: laboratory mouse eating something

Multiple Sclerosis: does the colon affect the immune system?


Multiple sclerosis apparently can strike anyone - regardless of age, family history, lifestyle or gender. Yet why then does it not strike everyone? Genetic and environmental factors appear not to be the only reason whether it develops or not. The countless microorganisms that colonize our intestinal tract could also be involved in this.
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Small companions: How wearables change our lives


They can be seen everywhere: at the wrists, in the ear, clipped to the belt. Wearables are small technical assistants who are built to collect and partially also to analyze data. Some of them collect measurable health data, others "only" count their user’s steps or measure the surrounding UV radiation. The fact is, however, that wearables are en vogue and are used for many different cases.
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MEDICA EDUCATION CONFERENCE: Preventing diabetes from affecting the kidneys


November 14, 2014 is World Diabetes Day – and MEDICA is also concerned with this metabolic disorder: several lectures at the MEDICA EDUCATION CONFERENCE are dedicated to the so-called “sugar disease” that affects 382 million people worldwide. The Conference addresses the damages caused by the disease, its prevention and therapy.
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Photo: Blue box at optical bench

Continuous glucose monitoring: "Our method is based on the principles of infrared photometry"


Patients in intensive care units do not just have to struggle with the consequences of a severe injury or disease – they are also subject to acute glucose fluctuations that compromise the healing success. These sometimes happen so quickly that they cannot be caught in time with existing discrete measurement methods.
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Diabetes mellitus: dangerous consequences, good prevention options


Diabetes is a lifestyle disease that could result in dangerous consequences for the individual patient and the entire society. However, you can successfully stop this disease with targeted prevention methods.
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Study on chronically ill patients: "Coaching can save money"


The German Technician Health Insurance (German: Techniker Krankenkasse) conducted a study on the Topic “Phone coaching helps seriously ill patients and saves money“. We spoke with Günter van Aalst about the interesting findings.
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