Image: Migrating pioneer neurons under the phase contrast microscope, selectively stained by a fluorescence dye; Copyright: TiHo

Novel test method to replace animal testing

17/08/2016

Testing the impact of chemo toxicity on the human development without having to resort to animal testing: To get closer to this goal, the University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation (TiHo) and the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) are developing a new in-situ test method to examine the hazardous potential of chemical substances.
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Image: Graphic shows a head with visible brain in the front and atom copmpounds and a genome in the background; Copyright: Panthermedia.net/tolokonov

Brain study confirms gene mutation link to psychiatric disorders

16/08/2016

Brain scans have revealed how a genetic mutation linked to major psychiatric disorders affects the structure, function and chemistry of the brain.
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Image: head of sugar cubes; Copyright: Panthermedia.net/lightsource

Sugar addiction: Discovery of a brain sugar switch

16/08/2016

Researchers at Technical University of Munich discovered that our brain actively takes sugar from the blood. Prior to this, researchers around the world had assumed that this was a purely passive process.
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Image: A copmputer monitor shows the brain activity of a monkey using a brain-machine interface.; Copyright: Shawn Rocco/Duke Health

Brain-machine interfaces: Paraplegics regain feelings and movements

15/08/2016

Eight people who have spent years paralyzed from spinal cord injuries have regained partial sensation and muscle control in their lower limbs after training with brain-controlled robotics.
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Image: two scans of brains; Copyright: Lisa Ronan

Brains of overweight people "ten years older" than lean counterparts at middle-age

04/08/2016

From middle-age, the brains of obese individuals display differences in white matter similar to those in lean individuals ten years their senior, according to new research led by the University of Cambridge. White matter is the tissue that connects areas of the brain and allows for information to be communicated between regions.
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Image: An image of a brain, with different coulors; Copyright: INS UMR1106 INSERM/AMU

A virtual brain helps decrypt epilepsy

01/08/2016

Researchers at CNRS, INSERM, Aix-Marseille University and AP-HM have just created a virtual brain that can reconstitute the brain of a person affected by epilepsy for the first time. From this work we understand better how the disease works and can also better prepare for surgery. These results are published in Neuroimage.
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Image: Enlarged neurons. The cell bodies are purple, whereas the axons are green; Copyright: UAB

Discovery may lead to a treatment to slow Parkinson's disease

22/07/2016

Using a robust model for Parkinson's disease, University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers and colleagues have discovered an interaction in neurons that contributes to Parkinson's disease, and they have shown that drugs now under development may block the process.
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Image: Closed eyes of a patient. Electrodes are attached above the eyebrows; Copyright: savir-center.com

Electrical Stimulation: Using Electrical Pulses to Combat Blindness

22/07/2016

Millions of people all over the world suffer from partial blindness – caused by glaucoma, a stroke or traumatic brain injury. For years, the loss of vision was deemed irreversible. But now a new treatment makes it possible to improve eyesight and vision.
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Image: Microscopy image of a culture mouse neuron; Copyright: Carlos Sánchez-Huertas

The machinery that neurons use to form and maintain their neuronal extensions

22/07/2016

The study, led by IRB Barcelona and published in Nature Communications will help research into regenerative medicine and potentially also help understand neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s.
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Image: Graphic of a neuron, that is connected with many other neurons via synapses. The synapses are glowing at several points; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ktsdesign

World Brain Day 2016 - The ageing brain

21/07/2016

The World Federation of Neurology (WFN) invites the people to observe the World Brain Day for the third time in 2016. This year’s motto is “The ageing brain”. The focus lies on prevention of and dealing with the neurological diseases stroke, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, since the risk to fall ill with them increases with age.
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Image: The word

Prize for research into speeding up stroke diagnosis

20/07/2016

A mathematician at the University of Strathclyde has shared in a prestigious prize for research into methods for accelerating the diagnosis of strokes.
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Image: Black and white microscopic picture of a spongy nanomaterial; Copyright: University of Chicago/Tian Lab

New biomaterial developed for injectable neuronal control

15/07/2016

Ideally, injectable or implantable medical devices should not only be small and electrically functional, they should be soft, like the body tissues with which they interact. Scientists from two UChicago labs set out to see if they could design a material with all three of those properties.
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Image: Drawing of a head with the brain next to irregular waves; Copyright: panthermedia.net/drnn

New technique could revolutionize surgical treatment of epilepsy

12/07/2016

Scientists at the University of Exeter have developed a pioneering new technique that could revolutionize the surgical treatment of epilepsy.
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Photo: Amplified neurons

Vagus nerve stimulation reduces rheumatoid arthritis symptoms

06/07/2016

Clinical trial data published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) demonstrates stimulating the vagus nerve with an implantable bioelectronic device significantly improved measures of disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
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Photo: Red skeletal myotubes seen through a microscope

Researchers use gelatin to grow stronger muscles

05/07/2016

USC researcher Megan L. McCain and colleagues have devised a way to develop bigger, stronger muscle fibers. But instead of popping up on the bicep of a bodybuilder, these muscles grow on a tiny scaffold or "chip" molded from a type of water-logged gel made from gelatin.
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Photo: Paramedic Brett Schneider sits in an ambulance talking with a doctor via a tablet

Electronic tablets speed stroke care during patient transport

04/07/2016

A clinical trial testing mobile videoconferencing as a means for physicians to diagnose stroke patients while they're being transported to the hospital has found that a tablet-based system produced diagnoses highly correlating with a bedside assessment -- a finding that could have important implications for the early treatment of stroke and for preventing the disability it causes.
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Photo: Image with blurry warm and cold colors

Technique captures the activity of an entire brain in a snapshot

31/05/2016

When it comes to measuring brain activity, scientists have tools that can take a precise look at a small slice of the brain (less than one cubic millimeter), or a blurred look at a larger area. Now, researchers at Rockefeller University have described a new technique that combines the best of both worlds - it captures a detailed snapshot of global activity in the mouse brain.
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Photo: Female physician and a girl at a radiation therapy treatment room

Children: Play-based preparation for radiation therapy

30/05/2016

New research from St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital shows support interventions by child life specialists decrease sedation use and costs associated with cranial radiation therapy.
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Photo: laboratory mouse eating something

Multiple Sclerosis: does the colon affect the immune system?

01/12/2015

Multiple sclerosis apparently can strike anyone - regardless of age, family history, lifestyle or gender. Yet why then does it not strike everyone? Genetic and environmental factors appear not to be the only reason whether it develops or not. The countless microorganisms that colonize our intestinal tract could also be involved in this.
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ECG measurements: "Our chest strap moistens itself"

01/07/2015

When measuring myocardial activity, it is important for the skin to always stay moist under the electrodes of the ECG. Only then can data be consistently transferred. Athletes have an easier time with this: they are used to sweating. This is a lot harder for older patients.
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Graphic: human sacrum

"Neuromonitoring during lesser pelvis surgery is still uncharted territory"

08/05/2015

The bowel is surrounded by a dense plexus of nervous tissue that presents problems for surgeons. On the one hand, it is difficult to distinguish from the surrounding tissue; while on the other hand, sometimes portions of it need to be removed when parts of the colon are removed. Yet injuring these nerves can result in permanent damage.
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Making Your Own End-of-Life Decisions: “All options of palliative care, pain management and continued life need to have been explained to the patient“

01/12/2014

How does a physician handle a patient, who wants to die and what rights do I actually have as a patient? Legal practitioners do not automatically answer these and other questions. We talked about this subject with MD-PhD Ralf Jox from the Institute of Ethics, History and Theory of Medicine at the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Germany.
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Persistent vegetative state: brain stimulation with laser beams

01/09/2014

The public only notices diseases when celebrities become patients: in the spring of 2014, Formula One driver Michael Schumacher fell into a coma for several months as the result of a head injury caused by a skiing accident. These types of accidents show how delicate the brain responds to injuries. Brain stimulation could possibly support the rehabilitation of vegetative patients.
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Diagnosing Parkinson's: the skin is revealing

01/07/2014

In patients with Parkinson's, neural cells in the brain die off that produce the neurotransmitter dopamine. Certain physical symptoms that can indicate the disease follow years later. But a reliable diagnosis can only be made through examination of the brain after the patient's death, and not during his lifetime.
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