Image: A schematic picture of business people. In the center of the picture two businessmen shake hands; Copyright: panthermedia.net/scusi

T5 Career Forum – Combating the Skills Shortage

22/09/2016

In cooperation with the T5 KarrierePortal, this year marks the first time the T5 Career Forum will take place at the MEDICA trade fair. Here, future specialists and managers meet prospective employers in a condensed setting.
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Image: Open surgery at the forearm of a patient; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Chanawit Sitthisombat

Hemodialysis: Creating the AV fistula using catheters

08/09/2016

For many patients, the start of hemodialysis marks the lifelong dependency on needing their blood purified. But before they can actually begin treatments, a blood vessel in the patient's arm needs to be enlarged to where it can move enough blood and withstand being connected to the dialysis machine several times per week.
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Image: surgery Copyright: Klinikum Weiden/private

Intraoperative imaging – added benefit or high-tech gadget?

01/09/2016

Monitoring individual results during surgery with an angiography system? This is already an option in approximately 200 hospitals in Germany. Thanks to intraoperative imaging, major medical procedures can be replaced by minimally invasive surgery because physicians are able to monitor the results immediately. This is gentler on patients and decreases the number of subsequent revision surgeries.
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Image: OR with modern equipment, large screens and lamps; Copyright: Erwin Keeve, Charité

OR of the future: technology benefits surgeons

01/09/2016

When it comes to the future of medicine, we often ponder how we would like to be treated. On the other hand, there is the issue of how physicians would like to treat their patients. The surgical procedures are determined by the technology that doctors are surrounded by. That’s why technology development also needs to be adapted to the needs of surgeons in the operating room of the future.
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Image: girl in the MRI, physican besides; Copyright: Klinikum Dortmund/Dr. Lindel

MRI scan: Video projections help children overcome their fear

22/08/2016

A beautiful field of flowers, a trip to the beach or a visit to the zoo. Children can experience all of these at the Clinical Center Dortmund in a 270- degree projection on the wall. The Center created a space that is designed to help its little patients overcome their fear of MRI scans.
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Image: User interface of a software; Copyright: Helmholtz Zentrum München

Cell under observation: "The software lets us study the development on video"

08/08/2016

What happens when stem cells differentiate? What molecular characteristics do they have? Questions that can now be easier answered with the help of a new open-source software. We spoke with Prof. Fabian Theis at the Helmholtz Center Munich, who participated in the software development.
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Image: Blue Stethoscope next to a blue glass globe on a blue keyboard; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Neirfys

Blue versus Green Hospital: Economical in all departments

01/08/2016

Hospitals seldom operate economically and sustainably - old building structures and the intricate logistics operations involving expensive patient care are costly. To get out of the red, hospitals need to become more efficient in all areas. One way to achieve this goal leads through the Blue Hospital Concept.
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Image: Many stacked coins, from which a small green plant is growing; Copyright: panthermedia.net/vaeenma

Hospital Logistics: Ecology vs. Economy

01/08/2016

Hospitals logistics is a very broad field and encompasses many areas – ranging from surgical planning to patient transport but also including categories such as laboratory and waste disposal. But how does this broad spectrum fare in terms of sustainability?
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Image: Closed eyes of a patient. Electrodes are attached above the eyebrows; Copyright: savir-center.com

Electrical Stimulation: Using Electrical Pulses to Combat Blindness

22/07/2016

Millions of people all over the world suffer from partial blindness – caused by glaucoma, a stroke or traumatic brain injury. For years, the loss of vision was deemed irreversible. But now a new treatment makes it possible to improve eyesight and vision.
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Image: Plugs at the back of a computer; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Paylessimages

Interoperability: secure network connections

08/07/2016

Computers do not just need a common language to communicate with each other. Their conversations also need to be secure when they transfer medical data for example. Yet there are still many different systems by various providers in the health care system that are not able to properly communicate with each other. The solution is called interoperability.
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Photo: Two people with recumbent bikes during a race; Copyright: ETH Zürich/Alessandro Della Bella

Cybathlon: A new type of competition for people with disabilities

01/07/2016

Technical means that lend superpowers to humans are quite normal in comics and movies. In reality, their purpose is much more mundane: They are supposed to help people with disabilities in everyday life. MEDICA MEDICINE + SPORTS CONFERENCE, that takes place at MEDICA in November, is dealing with this topic, too.
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Photo: Carpenter works with a bench saw; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Marko Volkmar

Prevention: Digital tools for the digital workplace

01/07/2016

Added stress or relief? The digitization of the workplace is both since we can be better and more often reached and - at least in some areas - also be gradually replaced by a machine. But digital tools are also able to support us by measuring our body’s basic functions and warning us if we endanger our health.
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Photo: Screenshot of the web portal WISS

Wearables: web portal WISS to foster communication in professional sports

01/07/2016

Wearables like smartwatches and fitness trackers have fast become a part of our lives. These technologies are also being considered for use in professional sports. Data is meant to be analyzed and training optimized with the help of these devices, the web portal WISS (Wearables in Professional Sports, German: Wearables im Spitzensport) was created.
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Photo: Men and women running

Individualized sports medicine: training by design

22/06/2016

Exercise makes you healthy – oftentimes even when you are sick. That’s why doctors hardly ever recommend taking a break from it. Even patients who are about to receive a heart transplant can benefit from sports. As is so often the case, the dose makes the poison. We asked sports medicine physician Prof. Martin Halle, what people need to consider.
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Graphic: Hand holds a smartphone, four pictures in the background with rescue situations

Emergency: app alerts first responders

08/06/2016

Just a few minutes can make the difference between life and death when a person loses consciousness or goes into sudden cardiac arrest. Unfortunately, emergency medical services cannot always be on location as fast as needed. To ensure immediate life-sustaining measures, the "mobile rescue" app was developed, which alerts emergency medical responders in the immediate vicinity of an emergency.
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Photo: Money, latex gloves and stethoscope; Copyright: panthermedia.net/photographyMK

Business Interviews

07/06/2016

What happens on the market for medical products - let it be important technologies, national and international business, news from companies. MEDICA-tradefair.com talks to experts about current developments in health economy.
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Photo: Judge's gavel and medical hammer are crossed; Copyright: panthermedia.net/gwolters

Interviews Concerning Health Politics

07/06/2016

Good health is human's most precious thing. Since that applies to everyone politics concerned with health turn into an interesting, sometimes explosive subject. MEDICA-tradefair.com speaks with managers, experts and politicians about news from health politics.
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Graphic: Man is drawing a lit light bulb; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Melpomene

Interviews Concerning Innovations

07/06/2016

Inventions, technologies, devices - something new always happens in the field of medical technology. Experts, researchers and inventors talk about prospects of new treatments and sometimes also their dangers - at MEDICA-tradefair.com
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Photo: Large metal device with a pink glowing window in the fron

Plasmasterilization: active ingredient cocktail to fight bacteria

01/06/2016

Until now, plasma, the fourth state of matter,was consideredfascinatingonly to astrophysicists and science fiction fans. But at this point, it also attracts the interest of medicine because plasma can have many uses in this field. In the future, plasma sterilization could become an important component of hospital hygiene-provided that the right device is being used.
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Photo: Hospital  bed

Textiles used in hospitals and medical offices – germs don’t stand a chance

01/06/2016

Some hospitals have long banned the status symbol of physicians – the white coat. Research has shown that especially the sleeves were contaminated with various types of bacteria. But it’s not just lab coats that can spread germs in healthcare settings. This field uses a variety of different textiles. Wouldn’t it, therefore, make sense to apply antimicrobial finishes?
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Photo: Tracks at a running field marked 1, 2 and 3; Copyright: panthermedia.net/nikoniano

3 questions to ...

31/05/2016

Quick and in brief: We talk to experts from the industry about trends and topics in medical technology - in 3 questions only.
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Photo: Devices and products patients need to treat their diabetes

Artificial pancreas: an (almost) automated diabetes treatment?

22/05/2016

The treatment for diabetes is very time-consuming for patients: they need to regularly monitor blood sugar levels, take medication and inject insulin. Poor self-management may result in a dangerous lapse in blood glucose levels. Yet external factors can also contribute to diabetes being out of control. An artificial pancreas system could offer relief.
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Photo: Doctor at laptop

New E-Health Act: "Patients have control over their data"

08/05/2016

The "Act on secure digital communication and applications in the health care system" (the e-Health Act in short) took effect on December 29 last year. By the end of 2018, hospitals and medical practices will be gradually introduced to the new features of the electronic health card and telemedicine.
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Photo: Three men pose during an award ceremony

Cardiac insufficiency: early diagnosis with ultrasound

02/05/2016

Heart failure or cardiac insufficiency presents an extra strain on patients because it severally limits everyday performance and deprives them of energy. Due to their intense need for movement, children are particularly strongly affected. However, the disease is frequently not detected until the physical performance is already declining. An early diagnosis could prevent this.
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Photo: Stent in human body

Safe or Not Safe? "The AB-DES has not gained market access in countries like Japan or the U.S."

01/05/2016

Antibody-coated, drug-eluting stents (AB-DES) feature an exterior coated with immunosuppressant drugs and an interior that is coated with antibodies to accelerate the adhesion of endothelial cells. In theory, this makes it possible to shorten the duration of therapy with blood thinners, which can mean relief for patients from an already difficult situation.
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Photo: ceramic joints

Knee at your fingertips

22/04/2016

How can you print ceramics, what purpose do they have and how benefits medical technology? Answers provides Dr. Tassilo Moritz from Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems IKTS.
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Photo: Child gets pierced into the finger using a lancing device

Diabetes: comprehensive prevention, early "vaccination"?

08/04/2016

A diagnosis of diabetes often catches new patients off guard - for instance if they end up in the emergency room suffering from metabolic decompensation. Children are often affected by this. Their immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas early on in their lives, thus causing type 1 diabetes.
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Grahpic: Conference

Continuing medical education: "You need to utilize various sources"

01/04/2016

What characterizes great continuing education courses and how can they be kept current? MEDICA-tradefair.com asked Professor Reinhard Griebenow, among other things, Chairman of the ÄkNo "Continuing Education Committee of the North Rhine Academy of Continuing Education".
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Photo: DNA section

Human Genetics: "Physicians should be able to counsel patients on the process"

01/04/2016

Human genetics is the study of the genetic makeup of human beings. DNA, chromosomes, and genes are extensively analyzed by medical specialists. Physicians of Germany need to have a qualification in genetic counseling to successfully advise patients.
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Photo: Old woman with a smartphone

Health Apps: "Mobile Applications for smartphones have strengths and weaknesses"

22/03/2016

Medical apps like diabetes or high blood pressure diaries are becoming increasingly popular with smartphone users. There are many available choices out there but they are not always clear. Added to this is the question of how the data collected by the apps can be sensibly incorporated into treatment.
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Graphic: The pancreas and the surrounding organs

Pancreatic cancer: diagnosis via signature analysis

08/03/2016

Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest forms of cancer because it is difficult to diagnose and only presents with symptoms in the later stages. In the future, a laboratory test developed at the Greifswald University Medicine could make an early detection of this type of cancer and consequently a faster and better treatment possible.
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Photo: Three-dimensional model of the right ventricle

Ultrasound: four dimensions for pediatric cardiac diagnostics

01/03/2016

Fortunately, only a handful of newborns are affected by them, though this determines if not the rest of their lives then, at least, the first few years of affected children: congenital heart defects. After the necessary surgeries, the small patients repeatedly need to return for checkups. Until now, these were conducted using MRI scans. 4D ultrasound can be an alternative.
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Photo: Researcher is looking at a microfluidic LabDisc

Point-of-care-testing: from disc to diagnosis

22/02/2016

Easy solutions that deliver results quickly are a great asset in medicine: patients receive their diagnosis faster and physicians have more time to treat them. Such tools also work without sophisticated resources and trained personal. A device currently developed in a project funded by the European Commission could bring all of this to point-of-care-testing for infectious diseases.
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Photo: two physicians working at a test set-up

Atherosclerosis: Getting to the root of the problem with a turbo gene

09/02/2016

Many people suffer from atherosclerosis, especially in developed countries. The buildup of fatty deposits inside the arterial blood vessels leads to strokes and heart attacks. Now, a new method is designed to get to the root of the problem, and with the help of nanoparticles inject new turbo replacement cells into the blood vessels which are intended to exert their curative effect.
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Graphic of the operation

Filling bone defects – replacement tissue with its own blood supply

01/02/2016

First grow tissue in the lab, then insert it into patients when they need it and you’re done! Unfortunately, things are not as easy as people hoped at the onset of “tissue engineering”. Although robust tissues for bone defects can be grown in a petri dish, for example, they unfortunately quickly die off again inside the body if there is no corresponding nutrient supply.
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Photo: Printer head over a glass sheet

Melt electrospinning writing: polymer fibers for tissue engineering

01/02/2016

Sometimes, soft tissue in our body needs to be replaced after surgery or an injury. But surgeons are not always able to take tissue from other body parts as a replacement. Then, they need to use implants. The production of soft implants that can constantly endure load and stress like our own tissue is a big challenge for research. Melt electrospinning writing can be a solution.
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Photo: Knee implant

Customized Implants cover bones optimally

22/01/2016

It may fits, but somewhere it still tweaks. Although a suit off the rack serves its purpose, it is still far from being an ideal solution. With a custom made heart it is different. It is similar with implants. Often patients complain about the fact that those implants feel strange. 3D printing is on the best way to change this. Here, the implants are adapted to the carrier.
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Photo: artificial heart valve

Artificial heart valve: "The structure is meant to be broken down again by the body at a later point."

08/01/2016

There are various artificial heart valves available for children, but they have one essential drawback: they need to be replaced because the children are still growing. The artificial valve, on the other hand, remains the same size – and subsequently becomes too small. This is why an artificial heart valve that grows over time would be ideal.
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Photo: Ebola test

Ebola: detection strips instead of lab tests

04/01/2016

When infectious diseases such as Ebola break out, a rapid diagnosis is important because the early detection of a virus along with the right hygiene measures can prevent its continued spread. However, laboratories and skilled personnel are not available everywhere. Low-cost and portable detection strips can bring relief.
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Photo: Man in suit is multitasking

Occupational medicine 4.0: health in a globalized economy

15/12/2015

Digitization changes the working world - we all know that. While agriculture, industry and skilled trade had a nine-to-five working day in the past, networking and continuing flow of information sometimes render the nine-to-five job obsolete. The multimedia-based job involves its very own health risks.
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Photo: white implant lying in petri dish

Repairing the bile duct with bacterial nanocellulose

08/12/2015

The closure apparatus between the gallbladder and small intestine is frequently injured during gallbladder surgeries. So far, however, there has been no surgical option to bridge tissue defects. Now, a novel implant made of bacterial nanocellulose (BNC) could change this. Its nanofiber network makes it extremely robust so that it is able to take on a supporting function.
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Photo: Young man and older woman use a tablet together; Copyright: panthermedia.net/szefei

Telehealthcare: networking brings relief

04/12/2015

Nowadays, everyone has access to his stored data and is able to work with them on different devices – thanks to the cloud. By now, online data storage plays a role in medicine as well: patient data can be collected digitally and centrally, authorized personnel can access it to make the fastest and best patient care possible.
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Photo: Magnet draws zigzag lines

Magnetogenetics: how neural stem cells grow in a certain direction

01/12/2015

If you could stimulate brain cells to grow in a specific direction, you would probably be able to achieve a significant improvement in the health of patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease. This is why the MAGNEURON project focuses on this approach. The EU is funding the project with approximately 3.5 million Euros.
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Photo: laboratory mouse eating something

Multiple Sclerosis: does the colon affect the immune system?

01/12/2015

Multiple sclerosis apparently can strike anyone - regardless of age, family history, lifestyle or gender. Yet why then does it not strike everyone? Genetic and environmental factors appear not to be the only reason whether it develops or not. The countless microorganisms that colonize our intestinal tract could also be involved in this.
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Photo: Small POC test kit for blood samples; Copyright: bate-web/Spelleken

Nutrition: finding intolerances in the blood

27/11/2015

More and more people suffer from allergies and food intolerances. Laboratory diagnosis for these often takes long and can be inaccurate. Healthcare practitioners increasingly rely on point-of-care tests to avoid costly laboratory tests and quickly find solutions for their patients.
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Photo: Secretary Svenja Schulze talks with students

Building bridges between technology and marketing

23/11/2015

Marketing has become an indispensable tool. Who nowadays wants to establish a product on the market has to recognize and implement the interests and needs of the customer. Prof. Uwe Kleinkes leads the study program "Technical Management and Marketing" at the Hamm-Lippstadt University. Here students learn, among other things, to develop ideas, to communicate them and to convince the customer.
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Image: Esophageal Cancer

Esophageal cancer: increased patient safety thanks to the ”Da Vinci“ surgical system

09/11/2015

Interview with Professor Jürgen Weitz, Director of the Clinic and Polyclinic of Visceral, Thoracic, and Vascular Surgery, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus at the Technical University Dresden
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Photo: Smiling man - Sven Seifert

A new world: hybrid operating room workstation

02/11/2015

Performing surgery in a hybrid operating room is meant to be a relief for the staff and offer patients new options for treatment. What is actually so different about this hybrid operating room, what can you expect and what should you keep in mind during the planning process?
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Photo: stethoscope lying on a health-insurance card

Health economics: A counterbalance to economic policy?

02/11/2015

Health economics is always expanding and is, therefore, one of the main pillars of the overall Germany economy. This results in a variety of economic, social and technical challenges that need to be overcome. Oftentimes however, the focus here is on sales and profit over the benefits of patients.
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Photo: Surgeon uses command devices for a robot

Robotics: surgery with feeling

02/11/2015

Minimally invasive surgeries are gentler on the patient but have one distinct disadvantage for the surgeon: he is not able to interact directly with the operating field. Sometimes he misses impressions that are very important to the success of the intervention. The MiroSurge robot for surgical applications which transmits feedback to the surgeon can help.
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Photo: Older woman walks with a rollator

Geriatrics: walking better with smartphones

22/10/2015

Many end-users already have had a smartphone that counts steps and apps that help in disease prevention for a long time. But in professional medical use environments like hospitals and physicians' offices these little helpers are just arriving - or not even there yet. Still, these gadgets can make assessments easier and more precise. For example in geriatrics.
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Photo: laboratory staff evaluating DNA

Direct-To-Consumer Testing: the business with lifestyle tests

08/10/2015

The many possibilities the Internet offers also don’t shy away from laboratory medicine. The demand for biochemical or genetic tests continues to rise. Next to standard laboratory tests, a market developed in which the patient is the immediate recipient of clinical results. New distribution channels eliminate the physician as the responsible party.
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Fighting myomas with ultrasound

01/10/2015

A proper diagnosis is a part of great therapy. However, it can also be beneficial to be able to quickly respond to changes during a treatment. One example of this is the treatment of uterine myomas. Female patients at the University Hospital Bonn are treated using so-called high-intensity focused ultrasound, HIFU in short. Prof. Holger Strunk explains this procedure.
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From the periodic table of elements into medicine: silicon for theranostics

01/10/2015

Semiconductor nanoparticles for biomedical applications have been researched for some time now. Not only are they millionths of a millimeter in size, they also offer great potential for cancer diagnostics and therapy, so-called theranostics. They enter cells, are activated by ultrasonic radiation and destroy the cells using the generated vibration.
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Graphic: Bridge connecting EU and Russia; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Alexander Kharchenko

Is the Russia crisis also a crisis for medical technology?

01/10/2015

The Ukrainian political turmoil has been keeping the world in suspense since 2013. It has also caused growing tensions between Russia on the one hand and the U.S. and EU on the other hand. Both sides try to pressure each other with sanctions against individuals, international financial transactions and whole industry branches.
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Photo: Running doctor

Industrial therapists in hospitals: changing structures

22/09/2015

Hospitals only achieve a high level of patient safety if the workplaces of all their employees are optimally designed. Things can become life-threatening when doctors and nursing staff have not been properly trained. Dr. Carsten Ostendorp at the Center for Industrial and Organizational Psychology in Hospitals (ZAK), spoke about this topic with MEDICA.de.
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Photo: Older man and physical therapist during exercise

Adaptify: Flexible games to support physiotherapy and rehabilitation

08/09/2015

Personalized approaches in medicine are very popular. Treatment with customized therapies is intended to achieve better results and be less stressful on the patients. This could soon also be the case for physiotherapy and rehabilitation since every person is not just different - he also moves differently.
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A wearable to draw a complete picture of the heart

01/09/2015

Smartphone apps and wearable sensors have the potential to help people make healthier lifestyle choices. Self-monitoring therefore is one of the core strategies for changing cardiovascular health behaviors. On the other side, patients benefit from sharing their data with doctors and electronic health record (EHR) systems.
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Wearables and apps: insecure connections, careless users

01/09/2015

They are exciting for enthusiasts of the "quantified self" movement and extremely useful for athletes: wearables that measure and store numerous body parameters and enable long-term data analysis. Yet, for their use in medicine and rehabilitation, manufacturer and user both need to ask themselves how safe the devices actually are.
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Photo: huge data server

Big Data: breaking the curse of dimensionality

24/08/2015

The term big data is complex. On one hand, it describes the amount of data itself while characterizing the technology required to collect and analyze the data on the other. The fact is big data is essential in medicine. Data-supported models not only assist in promoting medical research, they also make it easier to reach treatment decisions.
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Photo: Empty patient's room

Krankenhaus Rating Report: Not every hospital needs to be maintained

10/08/2015

This year’s German Krankenhaus Rating Report concludes: the probability of insolvency for German hospitals continues to increase. More than ever, the demographic change demands a more efficient health care system. This also includes the closing of several hospitals, particularly in rural areas. The scheduled Hospital Structures Act is soon said to make this decision easier.
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Fast and low radiation exposure: The newest generation gamma camera

03/08/2015

Nuclear medicine physicians use so-called gamma cameras for myocardial perfusion scintigraphy. The devices record radioactive substances that are injected into the patient and show changes in the heart muscle (myocardium). Now a new gamma camera is able to record images faster and by using much less radiation.
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Prostate cancer: Agent with theranostic potential

03/08/2015

Endoradiotherapy can be very unpleasant for cancer patients, since it does not only harm tumor cells, but also healthy ones. Sometimes, patients even need to stop therapy because of the side effects. Physicians and researchers are thus continuously searching for ways to transport radiopharmaceuticals directly and exclusively to their target.
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Photo: Prof. Thea Koch

Tele-ICU care also benefits physicians

22/07/2015

Tele-ICU care with which the U.S. has already had excellent experiences is meant to also be implemented in Germany so facilities are able to provide their patients with optimal care. MEDICA-tradefair.com spoke with Prof. Thea Koch, President of the German Society for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine about this subject.
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Photo: People with covered faces

Data protection: Can medical research be anonymized?

08/07/2015

Electronic health records, telemedicine, cloud computing and big data: questions about data protection appear everywhere in digitized health care. Yet what do things look like far away from application at the foundations of medicine? Can patient data and personal rights in research be protected when several centers and numerous researchers participate in studies?
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ECG measurements: "Our chest strap moistens itself"

01/07/2015

When measuring myocardial activity, it is important for the skin to always stay moist under the electrodes of the ECG. Only then can data be consistently transferred. Athletes have an easier time with this: they are used to sweating. This is a lot harder for older patients.
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Wanted: rapid test to prevent deep vein thrombosis

01/07/2015

Deep vein thrombosis is not just a risk factor for frequent flyers but also for wearers of cardiovascular implants and newly operated patients. Blood thinners prevent these dangerous blood clots from forming, but they need to be carefully adjusted and do not work the same way in every patient. A detailed analysis of platelets (thrombocytes) could prevent complications in the future.
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Photo: Image with red luminous bladder, next cystoscope

Making the invisible visible with fluorescence

22/06/2015

Bladder tumors have different growth characteristics. In most cases, they are limited to the inner wall of the bladder and thus well resectable. Unlike carcinoma in situ, which becomes muscle invasive after a certain amount of time. To be able to completely remove the tumor during resection, photodynamic diagnostics (PDD) can make sense.
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Photo: Mini organ chip

Mini synthetic organism: When the heart beats on a chip

08/06/2015

Replicating the human organism in a mini format – researchers at the Fraunhofer IWS braved this challenge. They developed a compact system where different physical processes can be imitated on a chip. It is also possible to copy cardiac and pulmonary functions.
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Cancer Immunotherapy: Individual mutations as new target structures

01/06/2015

A tumor is as unique as the person who is affected by it. For a long time, it was assumed this would make treatment more difficult since cancer drugs are not able to be one hundred percent effective in targeting the affected cells. In this interview with MEDICA.de, Professor Ugur Sahin explains why it is precisely these individual mutations that make him hopeful for a new type of therapy.
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Lung cancer: A blood test evaluates the effectiveness of therapy

01/06/2015

Can liquid biopsies become the new trend in cancer diagnostics? The medical world has asked this question for quite some time. The first globally approved liquid biopsy-based test for lung cancer shows that this can work. Yet further findings and research are still required to establish this less invasive method in diagnostics.
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Photo: Stents

Stents: Braiding versus cutting

22/05/2015

Braided stents are nothing new in medicine, but their manufacturing process is still time-consuming. This is why Professor Stefan Jockenhövel from the RWTH Aachen University and his team want to make machine production possible.
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Graphic: human sacrum

"Neuromonitoring during lesser pelvis surgery is still uncharted territory"

08/05/2015

The bowel is surrounded by a dense plexus of nervous tissue that presents problems for surgeons. On the one hand, it is difficult to distinguish from the surrounding tissue; while on the other hand, sometimes portions of it need to be removed when parts of the colon are removed. Yet injuring these nerves can result in permanent damage.
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Early cancer detection: "Physicians and patients need a good database"

04/05/2015

Whether it is a mammogram, colonoscopy or a skin cancer screening – after a certain age, we are subject to various early cancer detection screenings. Yet many of us don’t know that these screening tests are also associated with risks. This is something what Dr. Sylvia Sänger from the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf discovered in a study.
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Photo: Breast implants

Medical Devices Directive: Inspected and still not safe

22/04/2015

The Medical Devices Directive defines what constitutes a medical device. At the same time, it inspects and monitors. However, scandals in the medical technology industry keep causing uncertainty. They rekindled debate over the safety and transparency of medical devices and also triggered changes on an international level. As a result, new laws are needed more than ever.
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Photo: One green apple between many red ones

Rare Diseases: All information online at ZIPSE

08/04/2015

They are rare, often under-researched and it is difficult to learn about them – rare diseases. Patients, family members and even physicians frequently have a hard time finding qualitative information on diagnosis and treatment options or specialized care providers. Thanks to the Central Information Portal for Rare Diseases, ZIPSE, this should soon change.
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The patient's perspective is also important for physicians

01/04/2015

Communication is the key to success when it comes to the patient-physician relationship. Compared to the past however, this relationship has changed somewhat: although physicians are still the experts, thanks to the internet and popular science, patients now also know more about health and diseases. An "informed patient" is not a problem for physicians, but rather a source of better understanding.
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Photo: Knee operation

Cartilage Registry: "We generate fully independent data"

23/03/2015

Does a patient benefit from treatment or not? How many patients are being treated as a result of damaged cartilage in the knee joint? What intervention is performed most frequently? These and other questions are meant to be answered in the future with the help of a new Cartilage Registry, which was created by the German Society for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery.
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Photo: Silicon model of the lung in a bluely lit water tank

Lungs: "Liquid ventilation is still not sufficiently researched"

09/03/2015

All swimmers know the unpleasant feeling when you breathe in at the wrong time and then have water enter into your windpipe. At best, it immediately triggers the cough reflex, which is intended to keep the water away from the airways and prevent suffocation. However, liquid in the lungs can also save people - especially if it allows them to breathe again.
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Communication: How does the neighbor actually do it?

02/03/2015

In Europe, or rather: at least between Germany and the Netherlands, the answer to this question often is not more than a subject for jokes. A current research project about strategic communication in hospitals now wants to show that and how neighbors actually are able to learn from each other when they look to the other side of the fence.
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Crisis Management: Keeping the big picture in mind

02/03/2015

How should a hospital best respond to an emergency and which types of crises should it be prepared for? We spoke with Professor Ronald Glasberg at the SRH Hochschule Berlin on this subject.
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Photo: Ensminger and Gummert holding a 3D heart replica

Aortic valve replacement: Precise preoperative surgical preparation thanks to a silicone heart

23/02/2015

An 80-year-old female patient needs a new aortic valve replacement. Since the old one is severally calcified, the leaflets no longer open properly. Due to various factors, the patient is considered inoperable. Nevertheless, to make surgery possible for her, specialists at the Heart and Diabetes Center NRW in Germany have prepared the intervention based on an exact 3D heart replica.
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Photo: pink bird on top of the membrane

Gently administering drugs with a membrane containing active ingredients

09/02/2015

Injections are not popular with either children or adults. For years, researchers have therefore been looking for a way to administer drugs in a gentler manner. Swiss scientists now developed a membrane that releases active ingredients under ultraviolet light. It could revolutionize how drugs and vaccines are being administered.
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Photo: Child in hospital

Pediatric pathology: Specialized knowledge for the youngest

02/02/2015

When children are sick, their parents take them to a pediatrician. A pediatric pathologist is needed when pathology exams need to be conducted. This branch of pathology requires specialized knowledge. The Society for Pediatric and Fetal Pathologists is championing the transfer and preservation of this knowledge.
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Photo: Object slides

Tissue storage: "Our top biobanks are internationally leading the charge"

02/02/2015

Only projects with a solid foundation are successful in the long run. This is also true for science. Biobanks are the most important component of this foundation when it comes to fundamental biomedical research: Only high quality tissue samples that are stored there make conclusive research possible - for example in search of the causes of tumorigenesis.
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Photo: Patient at the ICU

"We simply want to improve intensive care medicine"

22/01/2015

Something we learned from nuclear power plants: since 2010, peer reviews are being conducted in German intensive care units. These voluntary peer reviews are primarily intended to improve the quality of intensive care medicine. Ultimately, it is not just the patient, but also the hospital that benefits from this.
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Photo: Scene from a play

"Art and culture are well suited for all areas of healthcare"

08/01/2015

Theater, choir, photography – art and culture soothe the soul. Professor Erwin Wagner of the University of Hildesheim Foundation, who founded the "KulturStation" project together with the AMEOS Clinic, is sure of this. Patients and associates of the hospital’s psychiatric unit were involved in artistic activities. The goal was to improve well-being.
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Photo: device for standardized wounds

ARTcut: Standardized injury of skin models for wound healing research

08/12/2014

Comparative research models are indispensable in wound healing research to evaluate new treatments of chronic wounds. Consequently, studies need to exhibit equivalent basic prerequisites and be conducted on similar wounds. This is why a team of researchers is working on an automated process to place standardized wounds in skin models.
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Making Your Own End-of-Life Decisions: “All options of palliative care, pain management and continued life need to have been explained to the patient“

01/12/2014

How does a physician handle a patient, who wants to die and what rights do I actually have as a patient? Legal practitioners do not automatically answer these and other questions. We talked about this subject with MD-PhD Ralf Jox from the Institute of Ethics, History and Theory of Medicine at the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Germany.
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“When patient monitoring becomes too intensive, it violates human dignity and human rights“

01/12/2014

Modern medical technology shortens and makes care processes easier, while it ensures the safety of patients at the same time. However, monitoring or electronic sensors for remote surveillance keep being accompanied by ethical violations. Patients feel like they are being watched and in the worst-case scenario, robbed of their freedom and autonomy.
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Grafic: A lot of different people as comic book characters

Population study: "We want to track the study participants over many years"

24/11/2014

How do diseases of civilization develop and can they be prevented when you know triggering factors? A new National Cohort should deliver answers in the coming years. The Leipzig Research Center for Civilization Diseases is involved in this study. We spoke with Dr. Kerstin Wirkner, who is going to co-supervise the study in Leipzig.
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Photo: Gold piece surrounded by black ones

Genetics: “We try to simplify diagnosis for rare diseases“

10/11/2014

Sometimes your TV is actually right and diagnosing an illness is really a puzzle. This is the case with rare diseases for example, which only affect a small portion of the population. Physicians are then confronted with the problem of not having enough experience with a specific illness and its symptoms to be able to make a diagnosis.
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Xenon magnetic resonance imaging: making pathological changes in the body visible

03/11/2014

As an imaging procedure, magnetic resonance tomography has become essential in clinical practice, since it can easily make organs and tissue visible. However, until now abnormal cancer cells or small centers of inflammation remained almost invisible. Now cell biologists from Berlin, Germany, have succeeded in fixing this problem with xenon magnetic resonance imaging.
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Photo: Blue box at optical bench

Continuous glucose monitoring: "Our method is based on the principles of infrared photometry"

22/10/2014

Patients in intensive care units do not just have to struggle with the consequences of a severe injury or disease – they are also subject to acute glucose fluctuations that compromise the healing success. These sometimes happen so quickly that they cannot be caught in time with existing discrete measurement methods.
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Photo: Application of the NanoKnife therapy

Prostate cancer: gentle removal with irreversible electroporation

08/10/2014

The NanoKnife® therapy practiced at the Prostate Center in Offenbach am Main removes prostate tumors in a gentle manner im comparison to prostatectomy or radiation therapy. In this interview with MEDICA.de, Professor Michael K. Stehling explains the advantages of the focal therapy.
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Photo: Dr. Anna-Maria Liphardt

Laboratory in Space: Hot on the Trails of Cartilage Degradation

01/10/2014

On November 10, 2014, astronaut Alexander Gerst will return to Earth from the International Space Station (ISS). He is not just anxiously expected by his family, but also by Dr. Anna-Maria Liphardt from the Institute of Biomechanics and Orthopedics at the German Sport University Cologne
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Photo: Spinal disc stress simulator

Spinal disc herniation: causal research with the simulator

01/10/2014

Herniated discs can have very different effects: some cause no discomfort and are only discovered by accident; others can cause paralysis or cause patients to be in great pain. For the most part, these problems develop suddenly after an awkward movement – at least that is what patients report.
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Photo: Nanodiamond

Nanodiamonds: "Our goal is not to be able to diagnose a specific disease, but to offer medicine a universal tool"

22/09/2014

They are not just “a girl's best friend“, but are also important helpers in medicine: diamonds. Yet the latter are so tiny that they are not visible to the naked eye. Dr. Patrick Happel at the Ruhr University Bochum in Germany studies so-called nanodiamonds. Someday soon, they are supposed to help in significantly improving medical imaging.
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Photo: Nurse in the OR checks a list

Surgical safety checklists: patient safety to check off

08/09/2014

You find out after surgery that the left knee was treated instead of the right one. Although such mistakes rarely happen, they can have serious consequences – both for the patient and the image of the physician and the hospital.
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Pediatric anesthesia: "I would object to a specialty medical training"

01/09/2014

When very young children already need to be in the operating room, it’s not just the parents that are concerned. This type of situation is a special challenge for the entire operating team, because children are always very special patients - especially since they are not just simply small grown-ups!
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The intensive care unit of the future - speedier recovery through feel good architecture

01/09/2014

The rooms in German intensive care units are cold and dreary. Hectic movements determine the patient’s everyday life along with noisy surveillance systems. Artificial light often also promotes a disturbed circadian rhythm. Sleeping pills are meant to solve this problem, but they also increase the risk of delirium at the same time.
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Photo: People in the waiting room of a doctor's office

Vaccines: activatable depot to replace multiple injections

22/08/2014

Besides antibiotics, vaccines may be the most important development in medicine: they protect us from diseases by “introducing” our immune system to pathogens. This way, a small injection saves us from severe and potentially mortal courses of disease.
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Photo: a hand holds a sign for magnesium

Absorbable magnesium scaffold: "The patches need to follow the movement of the cardiac muscle"

08/08/2014

A magnesium implant will soon be available to help patients, who exhibit damage in the high-pressure area of the heart. The implant protects a tissue matrix where new cells that replace the affected tissue are meant to grow. The implant itself is supposed to completely dissolve after several months. MEDICA.de spoke with D. Eng. Thomas Hassel about this exciting project.
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Hospitals: many small measures against infections and sepsis

01/08/2014

If neither the immune system nor antibiotics are able to control an infection, a sepsis can arise out of it - an infection that attacks several organs at the same time and causes the immune system to overreact. This is a life-threatening condition.
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Hygiene: "The sensor applies the principle of so-called photonic structures"

01/08/2014

Detecting infections quickly and reliably with the naked eye: This is what many doctors in hospitals and in the doctor's surgeries wish for. To make this dream come true, Prof. Holger Schönherr, a scientist from Siegen, is researching a sensor that should show an infection by a color change.
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Photo: Overweight people from behind

Diabetes mellitus: dangerous consequences, good prevention options

22/07/2014

Diabetes is a lifestyle disease that could result in dangerous consequences for the individual patient and the entire society. However, you can successfully stop this disease with targeted prevention methods.
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Photo: Modern OR at the Charité

OR technology: developing more flexibility and usability

08/07/2014

Gentle, safe, precise, fast – surgical interventions need to meet many demands: laws and regulations concerning safety, the desire for the best possible health outcome, economic requirements of hospitals and ever-changing technology make up today’s framework for surgery. As a consequence, operating theaters and the way they are equipped change, too.
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Diagnosing Parkinson's: the skin is revealing

01/07/2014

In patients with Parkinson's, neural cells in the brain die off that produce the neurotransmitter dopamine. Certain physical symptoms that can indicate the disease follow years later. But a reliable diagnosis can only be made through examination of the brain after the patient's death, and not during his lifetime.
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Photo: Course at MEDICA EDUCATION CONFERENCE 2013

Focused Content for an International Expert Audience

23/06/2014

The MEDICA EDUCATION CONFERENCE (MEC) debuted at MEDICA 2013 and replaced the long-time MEDICA Congress. With its new program, the Conference increasingly addresses an international expert audience. The goal is to unlock the practical benefit from the latest procedures in their application in clinical practice for physicians and patients.
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Photo: Middle-ages woman speaks at the phone

Study on chronically ill patients: "Coaching can save money"

10/06/2014

The German Technician Health Insurance (German: Techniker Krankenkasse) conducted a study on the Topic “Phone coaching helps seriously ill patients and saves money“. We spoke with Günter van Aalst about the interesting findings.
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Football: "We want to globally determine deaths for the first time"

02/06/2014

Sudden deaths of football players make headlines time after time: competitive athletes who are the idols of many people die just when they are on the playing field and in the limelight. Congenital heart defects often cause their death. Sports physicians and FIFA now plan to ascertain data that can help improve preventive examinations in competitive football.
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Vascular health in athletes

02/06/2014

"Sports are good for your health", as the saying goes. Regular exercise promotes the health of our blood vessels and prevents vascular diseases. However, many years of competitive sports can also have negative effects on vascular health and increase the risk of myocardial infarction. Prof. Martin Halle of the Technical University Munich explains at MEDICA.de what athletes need to pay attention to.
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Photo: Patient with a walking aid in the hospital

Quality in health care: "It is about the welfare of treated patients"

22/05/2014

Measuring quality in health care is not easy. Controlling it doesn’t just provide challenges for the medical sector, but also for policy makers. This is why measuring and representation systems for quality in hospitals as well as improvement concepts are being developed at the IGES Institute.
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Photo: Laptop and stethoscope

"The most important aspect in a service is always information"

08/05/2014

Medicine is no occult science anymore – books and magazines, documentaries and the internet help everyone to understand the human body and its diseases. Quality is paramount in this respect, since misinformation can mislead patients. The Health Media Award offers guidance also for lay people: it honors useful and effective information services.
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Mobile assistance systems: "The device automatically notifies if something is not right"

02/05/2014

Staying active and mobile when you are old – who doesn’t want that? People suffering from dementia can often only dream about that. The fear of not finding your way back home or not getting any help in an emergency severally restricts many affected people in the way they live their lives. Yet there are many people, who could still independently participate in life despite mild dementia.
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Graphic: Space station

"Studies involving microgravity suggest stem cells will grow faster in space"

22/04/2014

The International Space Station ISS is not only the largest artificial object in space. It is also a laboratory for physicists, chemists, biologists and physicians and orbits earth at 28.000 kilometers per hour at an altitude of 400 kilometers. Thanks to this location, the ISS could one day make an important contribution to regenerative medicine.
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Photo: Boss and employees

"Employees, who like to contribute their talents, stay healthy"

08/04/2014

Dr. Walter Kromm, Master of Public Health, is not just a general practitioner, but also a health advisor for management professionals. During his many years of practical experience, he kept realizing how important employee health is for the health of an entire company.
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RESCUER: "Crowds should take an active part in ensuring their own safety during major events"

01/04/2014

Thousands of people push through a tight tunnel: 21 people died while several hundred people were injured this way during the Love Parade 2010 disaster in Duisburg, Germany. Today we know that such disasters could be prevented, if communication between event participants and rescue workers would be better.
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Training: "Participants do not have to experience every mistake they make at the simulator with the patient first"

01/04/2014

In an emergency, every flick of the wrist has to be correct – the right treatment is time-critical and usually vital. Mistakes can be fatal, so emergency physicians and paramedics need to be seasoned and experienced. But they will not always know certain problems from their daily work. Using patient simulators, they are able to train for rare situations and learn possible solutions.
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"The secrets of an astronaut's health and fitness"

24/03/2014

He is kind of a "Bones" McCoy, since he keeps astronauts fit: Dr. Simon Evetts leads the Medical Projects and Technology team within the Medical Support Office of the European Astronauts Centre in Cologne, Germany. MEDICA.de talked to him about sports in universe, space technology and the benefits for us earthlings.
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Photo: Physician talks to a girl

"Pediatric conditions often require pediatric-specific engineering"

10/03/2014

Children are not just small adults and they cannot be treated as such. Physicians have recognized this but manufacturers of medical devices have a hard time here: the market for pediatric medical devices is very small and researchers have difficulties to turn their ideas into commercially successful products.
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Seminars for physicians: "Physicians are obligated to continue their education for the safety of their patients"

04/03/2014

Continuing education is an integral part of the medical profession, because research continuously delivers new findings that sooner or later make their way into patient treatments. How does an event need to be organized to provide the highest level of benefit for the participants? MEDICA.de spoke with Eva Ningel, Managing Director for beta seminare bonn berlin GmbH (bsbb).
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Sonography: "Unfortunately, hospitals are not being required to train well"

04/03/2014

Prenatal care, cancer check-up, vascular examinations – sonography is versatile, provides reliable imaging to physicians and does not tax patients with radiation. It is comprehensively available, from doctor’s office to university medical center. A sound continuing education of sonography users is essential for good diagnostics, also since different devices have different strong points.
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Photo: Researcher in the lab

"An MRI device the size of two to three shoeboxes could soon sit on your desk"

24/02/2014

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a well-established procedure in clinical diagnostics. It creates a signal with millions of nuclear spins, which in turn is converted into images. Very large magnets are being used to align the nuclear spins. Researchers at the University Medical Center Freiburg study a new method that can do without expensive magnets.
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"We don’t know why certain pharmaceuticals bind especially well while others bind barely at all"

10/02/2014

Prof. Joachim Heberle from the Free University of Berlin wants to make the smallest protein structures visible under the microscope. He wants to accomplish this with an infrared microscope, originating in the field of physics. He told MEDICA.de which technology is behind all this and what he also wants to examine with it in the future.
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Surgery: "Our camera detects the tiniest remainder of a tumor"

03/02/2014

Differentiating tumor tissue from healthy tissue isn’t always easy for surgeons. Scattered cancer cells and early cancer are often hard to detect with the naked eye. A special camera now makes even the tiniest remainder of a tumor visible during surgery.
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"The immunosensory system goes beyond the actual immune cells"

22/01/2014

It guards the body but can become its enemy: the immune system defends us from intruding pathogens; it is also able to cause severe diseases if it falsely recognizes the body itself as a threat. Molecular receptors in the whole body enable the immune system to “sense” what happens within.
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Photo: Man and woman visit a physician

"Gender-specific adjustments in clinical diagnostics and therapy can be expected"

15/01/2014

In Western civilization, equality of women and men has been a topic for many years and is already being successfully implemented in many areas, even if many obstacles still need to be overcome – the introduction of quotas for women in boardrooms, just to mention one of them.
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"The Virus Manipulates the Host Cell on Different Levels"

08/01/2014

Heart diseases can be triggered by special viruses that affect the cardiac muscle. Preventive drugs could definitely be developed – if the virus does not mutate.
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Clinical trials: "Registry-embedded clinical trials are the way of the future"

06/01/2014

Even medical risk products are not always tested as thoroughly as would be necessary – be it because of criminal energy, lack of know-how or financial reasons. A revision of clinical trial procedures could not only fix loop holes and methodological flaws. Products and methods could also be brought into general medical care more quickly under new rules.
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Safety in the operating room: "Switzerland is on the cutting edge"

06/01/2014

In the operating room, it is especially important for the used devices to be safe and tolerable to the human body. Switzerland also shares this point of view. MEDICA.de spoke with Dr. Christoph Röder from the University of Bern about approval procedures and regulations that are being pursued in Swiss operating rooms.
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Photo: Removal of a colon polyp with a snare

Endoscopy: "A small section of the colonic wall is completely removed"

05/01/2014

Eventually, all adults need to see a physician for colon cancer prevention. While the exam goes by quickly thanks to sedation, it sometimes leads to a follow-up procedure if a growth in the colon could not be removed with the endoscope and requires open surgery.
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Older Interviews

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